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careers in psych

Careers in Public Health

Alan D. Rowan, DrPH, CPH

Public Health Program

College of Social Science and Public Policy

Florida State University

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What is the Definition of Public Health?

  • Science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health and efficiency through organized community effort (Winslow, 1920)
  • Fulfilling society’s interest in assuring conditions in which people can be healthy (Institute of Medicine, 1988)
  • Health People in Healthy Communities
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABMSfiozfjg

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“Health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well being and not merely the absence of disease… that permits people to lead socially and economically productive lives” (WHO, 1978)

What are the activities in which Public Health professionals engage?

  • Public Health
  • Prevents epidemics & spread of disease
  • Protects against environmental health hazards
  • Prevents injuries
  • Promotes & encourages healthy behaviors
  • Responds to disasters & assists in recovery
  • Assures quality & accessibility of health services
  • Manage health organizations (hospitals, nursing homes, health dept.)
  • Research

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What types of organizations or businesses employ Public Health professionals?

  • Military
  • Federal, State, Local Governments
  • International Health Organizations (WHO, PAHO, NGO…)
  • Hospitals
  • Nursing Homes
  • Pharmaceutical Companies
  • Consultants
  • Industry (particularly Industrial Hygiene)
  • Disaster/Bioterrorism/Emergency Response

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How much graduate training is needed to become a Public Health professional?

  • Masters of Public Health (MPH)
  • Core Areas: Health Behavioral Sciences, Epidemiology, Environmental Health Sciences, Biostatistics, Health Policy & Management.
  • Primarily course work with a 200 hour internship.
  • Funding is available

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Are certifications or additional training needed to become a Public Health professional?

  • There are certifications and requisite CEUs for the various areas of the field. Some examples are CPH, RS and various specific discipline requirements (RN, MD, engineers…)

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How good are employment opportunities for
Public Health professionals?

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What salaries do Public Health professionals earn?

There are many different fields within public health, but the salary ranges are what you can expect after you graduate with an MPH and have worked about one year. (APSH 2013 Survey Results)

  • Health services administration: $38,400-$162,000
  • Biostatistics: $33,500-$64,000
  • Epidemiology: $45,300-$136,235
  • Health education: $33,000-$86,400
  • Clinical research worker: $38,000-$51,500
  • Environmental health: $44,500-$143,600
  • International health: $32,000-$84,000
  • Public health practice: $42,300-$102,000

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How flexible are working conditions for Public Health professionals?

  • Many public health professionals work part time.
  • Many work from home or outlying health agencies (e.g. Monroe County)
  • Dress dependent on job: field work vs. policy person.

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What skills and experiences should Undergrads Acquire if they are interested in Public Health?

  • MPH come from all backgrounds.
  • The guidelines for admission to the program are:
  • GPA > 3.0 or better
  • Score at or near the 50th percentile on the GRE (150 on each of the verbal and quantitative), and a 4 or greater on the analytical portion of the GRE. Also accepted are the equivalent results on the MCAT, LSAT, or GMAT.

Helpful experiences:

  • Visit or volunteer at local health department.
  • Experiences that allow you to earn strong letters of recommendation from professors

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What is the most rewarding aspect of being a Public Health professional?

  • Improving the health of large numbers of people.
  • Making lives better
  • Reducing infant mortality
  • Increasing life span
  • Improving quality of life for citizens

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What is the biggest drawback of being a
Public Health professional?

  • Public health is often a governmental responsibility. There can be political considerations and budget cuts.

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Website recommendations for students interested in Public Health

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careers in psych

Careers in Genetic Counseling

Katie Farmer, MS, CGC

Certified Genetic Counselor

Tallahassee Memorial Hospital

katie.farmer@tmh.org

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Definition of Genetic Counseling

Genetic counseling is the process of helping people understand and adapt to the medical, psychological and familial implications of genetic contributions to disease. This process integrates:

Interpretation of family and medical histories to assess the chance of disease occurrence or recurrence.

Education about inheritance, testing, management, prevention, resources and research.

Counseling to promote informed choices and adaptation to the risk or condition.

National Society of Genetic Counselors

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Activities in which Genetic Counselors Engage

Provide information and support to families who have members with birth defects or genetic disorders and to families who may be at risk for a variety of inherited conditions.

Identify families at risk, investigate the problem present, interpret information about the disorder, analyze inheritance patterns and risks of recurrence and review available options with the family.

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Activities in which Genetic Counselors Engage

Genetic counselors practice in the following areas of specialty:

Prenatal

Pediatric

Cancer Genetics

Adult

Laboratory

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Activities in which Genetic Counselors Engage

Prenatal Example:

Ms. Roberts is a 28 year old woman. She is 17 weeks pregnant and this is her first pregnancy. She has a routine blood test at her OB’s office. She is told that it screens for Down syndrome and some other conditions. A week after the test ,she receives a call from the nurse saying she came back “screen positive” for trisomy 18. The nurse tells her the chance her baby has trisomy 18 is 1 in 100. She is referred to a genetic counselor.

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Activities in which Genetic Counselors Engage

Role of a Prenatal GC

Review results of screening test

Obtain pregnancy and family history

Explain the cause and features of trisomy 18

Discuss further testing options

Facilitate decision making

Follow-up with further testing results

Use counseling skills to help patient cope with test results

Locate support resources for patient

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Activities in which Genetic Counselors Engage

Pediatric GC Example:

Emily is a 2 year old girl who was born with profound hearing loss. She is the only individual in her family with hearing loss. She was recently evaluated by an ENT to consider cochlear implants. The ENT recommended that she have a Genetics evaluation to understand the cause of her hearing loss.

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Activities in which Genetic Counselors Engage

Role of a Pediatric GC

Work closely with a medical geneticist

Review medical records

Obtain pregnancy, medical and family history

Discuss known causes of hearing loss

Discuss testing options

Coordinate testing

Counsel regarding test results and recurrence risk

Provide written information

Identify appropriate community resources

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Activities in which Genetic Counselors Engage

Cancer GC Example:

Mary is a 48 year old woman who is referred to a genetic counselor because her sister was recently diagnosed with ovarian cancer at age 52. Her father and paternal grandmother were also diagnosed with breast cancer at ages 58 and 45 respectively. Mary tells you her sister has a mutation in the BRCA2 gene.

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Activities in which Genetic Counselors Engage

Role of a Cancer GC

Obtain medical records and relative’s test results as appropriate

Obtain family and medical history

Pedigree analysis

Discuss features and genetics of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (BRCA)

Discuss risks and benefits of genetic testing

Review cancer risks and options for risk reduction

Arrange for testing if desired and follow-up counseling

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Organizations or Businesses that Employ Genetic Counselors

Majority of genetic counselors

work at:

University medical centers

Private or public hospitals

Some genetic counselors:

Work in laboratories

Coordinate research studies

Are employed by the state

Work in private industry

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Graduate Training Needed to become a Genetic Counselor

Master’s degree in Genetic Counseling

2 year degree programs

Graduate coursework

Clinical Rotations

Thesis/Capstone Project

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Graduate Training Needed to become a Genetic Counselor

www.abgc.net

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Certifications or Additional Training Needed to become a Genetic Counselor

Certification from the American Board of Genetic Counseling

Sit for board exam usually within a year of graduation

Must maintain appropriate amount of continuing education units (CEUs) every 5 years to keep certification (otherwise you take the exam again)

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Employment Opportunities for Genetic Counselors

NSGC 2012 Professional Status Survey

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Salaries Genetic Counselors Earn

NSGC 2012 Professional Status Survey

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Flexibility in Working Conditions for Genetic Counselors

Most jobs are full time, but part time positions are available

Many industry jobs (working with laboratories) allow for working remotely

Some level of travel is required with many of these positions

Professional attire is required

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Skills & Experiences Undergrads Should Acquire if Interested in Genetic Counseling

Each program has its own requirements

Check multiple program web sites for more information (www.abgc.net)

Prerequisite coursework typically includes:

One year of general biology

One year of general chemistry

One semester of biochemistry

One semester of genetics

One semester of statistics

In general, successful applicants have a minimum GPA of 3.0

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Skills & Experiences Undergrads Should Acquire if Interested in Genetic Counseling

– Volunteer experience

Crisis counseling hotlines and Planned Parenthood

Experience working with individuals with special needs

– Shadow a genetic counselor

NSGC – Find a counselor (www.nsgc.org)

– GRE

GRE scores at and above 70th percentile range are considered competitive

Some programs require GRE specialty exams as well

– Three letters of recommendation

– Personal statement

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Most Rewarding Aspect of being a Genetic Counselor

Opportunity to work with patients/families

Provide information and support to help individuals adapt to what can be difficult situations

Exciting field that is always progressing/evolving

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Biggest Drawback of being a Genetic Counselor

Must be mindful of burnout

Navigating health insurance system for patients is not always easy

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Website Recommendations for students interested in Genetic Counseling

American Board of Genetic Counseling

www.abgc.net

Accredits genetic counseling training programs and administers certification for genetic counselors

Has links to all training program websites

National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC)

www.nsgc.org

Professional Society

Has information on how to find a GC near you

Has information about genetic counseling as a career

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careers in psych

Careers in Educational Leadership & Policy Studies

Dr. Robert “Bob” Schwartz

Chair, Educational Leadership & Policy Studies

Professor of Higher Education

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Definition of Careers in Educational Leadership & Policy Studies

This field focuses on improving education, which is one of the most important influences on people’s health, wealth, as well as psychological and social functioning. Professionals may focus on improving early education, secondary education, college, or a combination of these. Work might occur on the local, state, national, or international level.

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Activities in which Educational Leaders & Policy Makers Engage

main examples:

principals and superintendents

faculty / academic researchers

research analysts, program evaluators, and policy makers (think West Wing)

student affairs professionals (Career Center, Union, Residence Life, Dean of Students, Center for Leadership & Social Change, etc.)

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Analysts, Program Evaluators, and Policy Makers: Activities

manage and analyze data (standardized test scores, school performance, large data sets on students, teachers, and schools)

Evaluation of educational programs

Policy changes, analytic support for policy makers, development of laws re education (many emerge from policy analysis)

President Obama’s proposal for free community college tuition program

Florida State University System performance funding

developmental / remedial education policy change in FL

development of Common Core, etc.

think macro-level impacts on the local, state, national, or international levels

P-16 (pre-K through college/university)

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Student Affairs Professionals: Activities

Post-secondary – college/university only (two and four year)

one-on-one advising

Advising First, Student Success Coaching, career counseling, etc.

program development

Outdoor Pursuits, LeaderShape, Orientation, etc.

administrative support for student support departments

Dean of Students, Residence Life / Housing, Campus Recreation, etc.

think micro-level impacts on the individual, program, departmental, and higher education institutional level

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Organizations that Employ Educational Leaders, Policy Makers, Higher Ed staffing

analysts, evaluators and policy makers

district, state or national governing bodies (e.g. school boards and legislature)

research think tanks, non-profit organizations and evaluation firms

US and abroad

student affairs professionals

colleges and universities

sometimes businesses with adult education / training initiatives

US and abroad

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Graduate Training Needed to Become an Educational Leader or Policy Maker

analysts, evaluators and policy makers

Usually master’s degree in Education Policy and Evaluation or International and Comparative Education, doctoral preferred for higher levels of responsibility and leading an office or agency

student affairs professionals

master’s degree in Higher Education

work experience in higher education

doctoral degree in Higher Education

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Certifications or Additional Training Needed to Become an Educational Leader or Policy Maker

None required- may seek out extra training in statistics, data analysis, and so on.

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Employment Opportunities for Educational Leaders or Policy Makers

legislative analysts – federal and state government

program evaluators and data analysts in the U.S. Department of Education, state education departments, local school districts

research analysts and program evaluators for research and evaluation firms

consultants and principals of evaluation firms (PhD)

research associates (MS) and Research scientists/principal investigators (PhD) in think tanks, non-profit organizations, research firms, and regional educational labs

advisors/success coaches in college or university departments

residence hall directors (MS) at colleges or universities

student activities coordinators (MS) in the FSU Union

Greek Life advisors (MS)

Orientation program coordinators (MS)

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Salaries for Educational Leaders, Policy Makers, Higher Ed administrators

analysts, evaluators and policy makers

$35,000-$150,000+ / year- ranging from early master’s degree holders to doctoral level with experience and head of agency, think tank, etc.

student affairs professionals

$30,000( with room and board) -$140,000+_ –per year ranging from early master’s degree holders to doctoral levels with experience 10 or more years

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Flexibility in Working Conditions for Educational Leaders, Policy Makers, Higher Ed

generally 8 am – 5 pm jobs, with lots of flexibility (no clocking in or out) but depends on positions and responsibilities

there are fast-paced times (reports are due, school is beginning) and slower times (summer or winter breaks)

almost everyone works through the summer, but it feels lighter because American students tend to be on break

generally supportive cultures

attention to race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, ability, etc. issues for our students = attention to the same issues for faculty/staff working conditions

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Skills & Experiences Undergrads Should Acquire if Interested in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

critical thinking, analytical reading, (for some) strong quantitative analysis skills

Experience in and tolerance for working with others; team player

leadership experiences, e.g. involvement with student organizations, groups, or interest areas with demonstrated service

international experiences / familiarity with international educational issues if you want to work abroad

Capacity for “thinking on your feet”, creativity, problem solving

Commitment to ethical standards, work on behalf of others

GRE scores- minimums: 149 Verbal, 147 Quantitative, and 3.5 Writing

GPA (undergrad)- prefer 3.0 on 4pt scale, esp. for last 60 hours (major)

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Most Rewarding Aspect of Educational Leader, Policy Maker, Higher Ed Professional

broad, highly relevant impacts

education is considered one of the most important influences in people’s lives (personally and for their well-being which can also impact future generations)

strong education systems improve communities and economies

educational leaders and policy makers are the experts who actually create change

compared to many educational fields, good pay and manageable hours

Influences on local, state, or federal policies

Higher ed professionals work with college students and can influence their lives and direction through advising, support, mentoring

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Biggest Drawback of being an Educational Leader and Policy Maker

Some people may not understand exactly what you do

everyone has an opinion on what’s wrong in education

there is rarely a “right” or “perfect” solution to the problems

limited resources ($$) means we can’t do everything, money can be tight

Biggest Drawback of being a

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Website Recommendations for Students Interested in Educational Leadership or Policy Studies

University Council for Educational Administrators – http
://
www.ucea.org

Association for Education Finance and Policy – aefpweb.org 

Comparative and International Education Society – http://cies2015.org/

Student affairs/Higher ed professionals

NASPA (Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education http
://
www.naspa.org/careers/undergraduate/careers-in-student-affairs-month

ACPA College Student
Educators
International-www.myacpa.org/

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careers in psych

Careers in Communication Disorders

SHANNON HALL-MILLS, PH.D., CCC-SLP

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION SCIENCE AND DISORDERS

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology

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What is the Definition of a Communication Disorder?

  • An impairment in the ability to receive, send, process, and comprehend concepts or verbal, nonverbal and graphic symbol systems.
  • May be evident in the processes of hearing, language, and/or speech.
  • May range in severity from mild to profound.
  • May be developmental or acquired.
  • May occur as one or multiple communication disorders in individual people.
  • May result in a primary disability or it may be secondary to other disabilities.

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Who works with people with Communication Disorders?

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What are the activities in which SLPs and AUDs engage?

  • professionals in the area of human communication sciences and disorders who:
  • evaluate
  • treat
  • conduct research
  • advocate
  • work with infants, children, adolescents, adults and older generations in schools, hospitals or other healthcare settings, businesses, in private practice, universities, research laboratories, and government agencies

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What are the activities in which SLPs engage?

Areas of practice

Articulation

Fluency

Voice & resonance

Language

Hearing

Swallowing

Cognitive aspects of communication

Social aspects of communication

Alternate communication modalities

Activities

  • Screening
  • Evaluation
  • Therapy Services
  • Consultation
  • Public awareness & prevention

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What are the activities in which AUDs engage?

Areas of practice

Hearing Disorders

Balance Disorders

Activities

  • Screening & Evaluation
  • Hearing aid fitting
  • Cochlear implant mapping
  • Consultation
  • Public awareness & prevention

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What are the activities in which SLPs & AUDs engage?

In addition to providing diagnostic and therapy services, they may:

  • train future professionals in colleges and universities
  • manage agencies, clinics, or private practices
  • engage in research to enhance knowledge about human communication
  • develop new methods and assess effectiveness of treatment approaches
  • serve as expert witnesses in court

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What types of organizations or businesses employ SLP and AUD professionals?

Healthcare settings

Hospitals (general and specialty hospitals), skilled nursing facilities, outpatient rehabilitation facilities

Private practices

Education settings

Schools, universities, early childhood centers

Businesses & Research centers

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How much graduate training is needed to become an SLP or AUD professional?

  • SLP: Minimum degree needed for licensure is the MS or MA
  • Typically a 2-year graduate program with academic courses and clinical practicum experiences
  • Some programs also require research experience within the curriculum
  • AUD: Minimum degree needed for licensure is the AUD (audiology doctorate)
  • Typically a 3-year graduate program with academic courses and practicum experiences
  • Both degree programs at the graduate level include a competency-based curriculum (i.e., fewer traditional tests; performance evaluated based on emerging clinical practice skills).
  • Funding options exist for both types of programs and are competitive.

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Are certifications or additional training needed to become an SLP or AUD professional?

  • Must complete a Clinical Fellowship Year after completion of their master’s degree. The CFY is paid and supervised employment at the entry level.
  • National credentials come from the American Speech Language and Hearing Association (Certificate of Clinical Competence= ASHA C’s).
  • States also have their own licensure laws and accept the ASHA credentials.

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How good are employment opportunities for
SLP and AUD professionals?

  • Jobs are plentiful and available in all sectors (healthcare, schools, businesses) and in most locations geographically within the US.
  • Jobs abroad are growing in number.
  • Several other countries recognize the ASHA credentials.
  • Market trends show continue growth for both fields.

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What salaries do SLP and AUD professionals earn?

  • Salaries depend in part on educational background, experience, work setting, and geographical location.
  • Median salary:
  • $70,000 for clinical service providers
  • $70,000 for university faculty
  • $90,000 for administrators, supervisors, or directors
  • For 2005–2011, SLPs in skilled nursing facilities had a higher median salary than those in other health care settings. (Salaries were higher by 9%–30%.)
  • employee benefits (e.g., insurance, leave, and professional development) are competitive

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How flexible are working conditions for SLP and AUD professionals?

  • Part time, Full time, and As needed (PRN) positions
  • Temporary or long term contracts
  • Telepractice is a growing service delivery option
  • Working conditions are favorable and comfortable
  • Attire in healthcare settings is usually scrubs. Other settings are business casual attire.

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What skills and experiences should Undergrads Acquire if they are interested in SLP or AUD?

  • Programs have different criteria levels for GPA, GRE scores, applicant letters of intent, letters of recommendation, work samples, research or volunteer experience, prior observation hours.

Consideration for admission to the FSU graduate program in SLP requires as a minimum:

Bachelors degree in Communication Disorders or completion of specific prerequisite courses.

Upper division undergrad GPA of at least 3.0 (*average admitted GPA is closer to 3.8)

Verbal and Quantitative GRE scores of at least 150. Writing score 4.

Letter of intent and 3 recommendation letters (>2 academic letters)

  • Competitive applications show strong academic AND clinical promise.

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What is the most rewarding aspect of being an SLP or AUD professional?

  • Working with people
  • Working with people who need you
  • Improving the human condition: quality of life
  • Seeing a child develop a new ability to communicate better or an adult learn to compensate for or regain lost communication skills.

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What is the biggest drawback of being a
SLP or AUD professional?

  • Children or adults with communication disorders face life challenges that can be difficult to overcome.
  • Family and social supports are important for clients and not everyone has the same support system.
  • Many clinicians express concerns about paperwork and documentation demands (in all settings).

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Additional information

FSU Speech and Hearing Clinic provides:

  • Speech-language services (all ages):

Evaluations

Therapy

  • Audiology services:

Evaluations

Hearing Aid Fitting

*Cochlear Mapping

  • Research:

Across the lifespan

  • Future Services:

Veterans Clinic (TBI)

Integrated Preschool

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Website recommendations for students interested in Communication Disorders

  • Video about our professions:
  • http://www.asha.org/students/professions/overview/slp.htm
  • For more information about careers, public information about speech, language, and hearing skills, or to search for an accredited program or professional near you:
  • American Speech Language and Hearing Association (ASHA): http://www.asha.org
  • National Student Speech Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA)

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careers in psych

Careers in Dog Training

Stephanie Bell, BA, CPDT-KSA

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What is the Definition of Dog Training?

  • The application of behavior analysis to modify the behavior of a dog.

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What are the activities in which
Dog Trainers engage?

  • Competition for Sport – working with dog fanciers or hobbyists to achieve set goals—agility, confirmation, obedience, herding, scent work, field trials, etc.
  • Behavior Modification – working with pet owners to achieve goals which are often unclear or fluid. Commonly addressing problem behaviors with a dog who has “baggage” in the form of behaviors that are “bad,” i.e., people- aggression, dog-aggression, chewing, barking, food stealing, resource guarding, etc.

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What are the activities in which
Dog Trainers engage?

  • Specialized “Task” Training – training a dog as part of a program that requires specific tasks. The dog is often selected and raised specifically to perform this task – service dogs, narcotics dogs, military dogs, protection dogs, etc.

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What types of organizations or businesses employ
Dog Trainers?

Many trainers are self-employed but some trainers work for businesses including:

  • Dog Daycares
  • Retail Stores
  • Veterinary Hospitals
  • Government Agencies
  • Non-Profits or Animal Welfare Groups

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How much graduate training is needed to become a
Dog Trainer

  • There is no formal education needed to be a dog trainer.
  • Professional dog trainers will often recommend obtaining certification through an independent organization that provides an education on behaviorism and applied behavior analysis.
  • Depending on the certification you chose, your level of education will vary. Veterinary Behaviorists need to attend vet school and so forth. For some certifications, a Masters in ABA or a DVM with a behavioral specialty is needed.

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Are certifications or special training needed to
become a Dog Trainer?

CPDT-KA – Certified Professional Dog Trainer; Professional Dog Trainers

ACAAB – Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist; Animal Behavior Society

CAAB – Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist; Animal Behavior Society

CABC – Certified Animal Behavior Consultant; International Assoc. of Animal Behavior Consultants

CDBC – Certified Dog Behavior Consultant ; International Assoc. of Animal Behavior Consultants

CCAB – Certified Clinical Behavior Consultant; International Assoc. for Study of Animal Behavior

DACVB – Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists;
American College of Veterinary Behaviorists

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How good are employment opportunities for
Dog Trainers?

  • For self-employed trainers, employment opportunities are largely self-determined. The more you work to promote yourself, the more business you will have. The quality of your work determines your ability to retain clients.
  • Most dog trainers work as part of the service industry. Areas of the country with a dense middle-class provide better employment opportunities for most trainers.

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What salaries do Dog Trainers earn?

  • Salaries vary according to area of the country, education level and skill level.
  • A salary range of $25/hour – $150/hour would be reasonable for the South-East.
  • Annual salary: locally ~$10,000-$50,000/year

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How flexible are working conditions for
Dog Trainers?

  • Working Conditions are Flexible for Self-Employed Trainers:

Can choose to work part-time or full-time

Although cannot do most work remotely, trainer may have online presence that can provide extra income

Casual dress is common

Scheduling is flexible, although should be able to work evenings and weekends

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What skills and experiences should Undergrads
acquire if they are interested in Dog Training?

Must like working with people

Must like working with animals

Must have excellent understanding of operant & classical conditioning

Must be comfortable with public speaking

Must be willing to learn from others, especially your clients and their dogs

Must be able to “train-test-train” and modify your protocol as needed

Must be willing to work within the parameters of the individual client’s capability

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What skills and experiences should Undergrads
acquire if they are interested in Dog Training?

Recommended Courses:

Conditioning & Learning with Laboratory (EXP3422C)

Applied Behavior Analysis (EAB 3703)

Courses in Animal Behavior

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What is the most rewarding aspect of being a
Dog Trainer?

Some “Pros” include:

  • Flexible schedule
  • Little to no startup costs
  • Few business expenses

But the most rewarding thing is being able to help a person communicate effectively with their dog and see how grateful they both are; in some cases, the trainer is saving that dog’s life.

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What is the biggest drawback of being a
Dog Trainer?

  • Salary (locally ~$10,000-$50,000/year)
  • No standardization or regulation
  • No education required; most trainers are “self-educated”
  • The feeling that failing your client may lead to the death of an animal

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Website recommendations for students
interested in Dog Training

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Book recommendations for students
interested in Dog Training

  • The Culture Clash by Jean Donaldson
  • Don’t Shoot the Dog by Karen Pryor
  • On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals
    by Turid Rugaas
  • Excel-Erated Learning by Pamela Reid

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careers in psych

Careers in Public
Administration

Public Administration

Ralph S. Brower, Ph.D.

Askew School of Public Administration
and Policy

Florida State University

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Definition for Public
Administration


Public administration is concerned with the management of public programs. Public administrators work at all levels of government, both at home and abroad; other public administrators manage nonprofit organizations, associations, and interest groups of all kinds.

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Activities in which public
administrators engage:

  • Local Government Administration
  • Leadership and Strategic Management
  • Human Resource Management
  • Public Financial Management
  • Civic and Nonprofit Leadership
  • Policy Analysis and Evaluation
  • Emergency Management and Homeland Security
  • International Development

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Organizations that employ
public administrators

  • Federal, state, and local government agencies
  • International governmental organizations, such as the United Nations, World Bank, and NATO
  • Local and national nonprofit organizations, such as the Red Cross, Boys and Girls Clubs, and Second Harvest Food Bank
  • International nongovernmental organizations, such as World Vision, Save the Children, and Amnesty International
  • Professional associations, such as labor unions, Florida Optometric Association, and Florida Health Care Association

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Graduate training needed to become
a public administrator

  • Master of Public Administration: approximately 42-45 credit hours; or
  • Master of Public Policy: approximately
    33-39 credit hours; or
  • Ph.D. in Public Administration – but only for academic, technical, or consulting positions: approximately 45-48 credit hours beyond the masters

*

Certifications or additional
training

  • Additional certificates or training are not required, however, additional certificates may help job placement in some fields;
  • For example, the Askew School offers certificates in:

Financial Management (18 credit hours)

Human Resource Management (18 credit hours)

Health Services Administration (15 credit hours)

General Public Administration (18 credit hours)

Emergency Management (15 credit hours)

Civic and Nonprofit Leadership (18 credit hours)

*

Employment opportunities
for public administrators

  • Students with backgrounds in psychology
    have especially important roles to play as:

Human resource managers;

Human service counselors, such as for youth
services, community mental health, criminal
justice, disabilities, and substance abuse;

Specialists in disaster-related stress and
trauma for emergency management.

Demand in recent years for entry-level
professionals:

Human service nonprofits: continuous demand

Local governments: continuous demand

State agencies (Florida): decreasing demand

Federal agencies: high demand in many fields

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Salaries public
administrators earn

  • Government agencies:

Starting: $30-35K

Top Executives: $100-250K

  • Nonprofit managers:

Starting: $25-35K

Top Executives: $100-$700K

  • Association managers

Starting: $35K

Top Executives: $100-$700K

  • University professors (Ph.D. required): $50-$180K

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Flexibility in work conditions
for public administrators

  • Some jobs offer shift options
  • Maternity/paternity leave in most government jobs
  • Discretion in clothing, so long as it’s professional
  • Some flexible hours permitted in some workplaces
  • Work from home (telecommuting) arrangements possible in some jobs
  • Some choices for job relocation to other communities

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Skills and experiences undergrads should have if interested in public administration

  • Most programs of study have no prerequisite course requirements, although courses in government and research methods are helpful;
  • To be competitive for better graduate programs in public administration you will need:

Minimum 3.0 upper division GPA (some programs higher, a few lower);

GRE scores (scores vary by program; Askew School requires a test score, but no minimum);

Community service, campus organizations and leadership are desirable but not required;

Three (3) letters of recommendation from professionals and professors who know you.

  • Admission requirements vary across programs.

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Most rewarding aspects of
being a public administrator

Making a difference in citizens’ lives

Making a difference for your community

Psychologically fulfilling

Creating public trust in government and civil society

Interacting with people whose ideas and values are different than your own

Confronting challenging problems and learning new things

Helping create and implement new public policies

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Biggest drawbacks of being
a public administrator

Your work is always in the public eye (transparency)

Some public problems don’t have practical solutions

Having to deal sometimes with unpleasant people

Can’t always control the “face” or the timing of problems you have to deal with

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Additional information about
being a public administrator

Many graduate programs offer joint degrees or other special programs; examples from the Askew School:

MPA/JD – with College of Law

MPA/MSC – with College of Criminology and Criminal Justice

MPA/MSP – with Department of Urban and Regional Planning

MPA/MSW – with College of Social Work

Five year combined BA/BS and MPA

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Website recommendations for those
interested in public administration


The Askew School of Public Administration and Policy: http://askew.fsu.edu


Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs and Administration:
http://www.naspaa.org
/

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