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Operations Management homework help

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THE COUNCIL OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES OF JAMAICA

BACHELOR DEGREE COURSEWORK

SEMESTER II – JANUARY 2022

PROGRAMME:
BACHELOR IN BUSINESS STUDIES

COURSE NAME:

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

CODE:

MGMT3612

YEAR GROUP:

2

Due Date :

April 21,2022

COURSEWORK TYPE:
FINAL PROJECT – GROUP 20%

INSTRUCTION: You are required to read the assigned
scenario
and create a detailed report (plan) of your findings.


SCENARIO

According to the PMBOK 5th edition, they define a project as a 
“temporary endeavour undertaken to create a unique product, service or result
”. It also takes into account the project scope which focuses only the work that must be done to successfully complete the project on time and within budget. In order to achieve this, a 
Scope Management Plan
 must be developed.

The purpose of the Scope Management Plan is to ensure that the project is composed of all the work required, and only the work required, to successfully complete the project. It is the blueprint for how the project scope will be defined, developed, monitored, controlled and verified. 

The Scope Management Plan documents the scope management approach and roles and responsibilities pertaining to project scope. It further defines those who will be responsible for managing project scope and serves as a guide for actually managing and controlling the project scope. Project Scope Management consists of the processes detailed below.

· Plan Scope Management  

· Collection Requirements

· Scope Definition 

· Work Breakdown Structure  

· Scope Verification / Validation 

· Scope Control

As such you are required to create a

Scope Management Plan

for a

Project

of your choice. This project may be one that your business/ organization will embark on, or it may be an external project of interest. Provide details on how the project scope will be defined, developed, monitored, controlled and verified. This must also include the Inputs, Outputs & Tools and Techniques to complete the project.


(35 marks)

In-addition;

a. Identify and list the essential activities for the completion of the project
.

b. Create a WBS for each activity and the total anticipated cost of the project.

c. Prepare a project master schedule/table showing activities, preceding activities and expected duration of each activity.

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS ONLY AN EXAMPLE

Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)

Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) divides the project tasks and activities in the form of work packages and sub-packages. It breaks down the project phase to come up with the project activities till the last level possible. The scope of the project becomes clear with the aid of the WBS. It is designed using the project requirements and it makes it easier to estimate the project schedule and costs.

 

WBS 

Task Name 

1 

N & E Construction Limited 

1.1 

   Initiation Phase 

1.1.1 

·      Meeting with the clients to discuss the determined date and details  

 

1.1.2 

       budget summary  

1.1.3 

· Determination of the construction team and resources to be allotted  

 

1.1.4 

· Listing of the location for building the house and mapping  

 

1.1.5 

      Milestone 1: Initiation Plan  

1.2 

   Planning Phase 

1.2.1 

· Estimation of the project schedule and the detailed budget  

 

1.2.2 

· Distribution of the budget to the sections of the home and sharing with the potential house owners 

 

1.2.3 

· Identification and analysis of the risks – Technical, Environmental, External  

 

1.2.4 

· Communication and reporting structure for the team 

 

 

·       Selection and finalization of house location(Luiz Lampa et al., 2017) 

 

1.2.5

· Procurement of the necessary equipment and resources 

 

1.2.6

· Beginning working on housing construction 

 

1.3

      Milestone 2: Project Plan  

1.3.1

   Event Execution & Monitoring  

1.3.2 

Foundation  

· Dig out the Layout  

· Lay block and steel 

· Run water Lines and electrical pipes 

· Pour Concrete 

1.3.3

Layout Structure  

· Lay Structure Blocks 

· Tie Steel and pour concrete  

 

1.4

· Build Roof 

 

 1.5

Plaster Walls  

· Install Windows and doors 

· Run electric Wiring  

· Clean Up 

 

 

 

 1.6

   Paint 

· Interior and Exterior Walls 

· Install cabinets and bathroom appliances 

· Install Furniture  

 

1.6.1

      Milestone 3: Constructing the House 

1.6.2

   Closure Phase 

1.6.3 

      Feedback from the clients 

1.6.4 

      Performance evaluation and discussion  

1.6.5 

      Development of a Closure Report  

1.6.5 

      Milestone 4: Closure Report  

Total Anticipated Costs

The project of organization and management of the home building will involve numerous costs. There will be multiple resources involved in the project and the cost of the resources will be involved. It will also include the cost of tools and material, organizing costs, vendor costs, and cost of handling the equipment as well as labor cost.

The cost break-up and the total costs that will be associated with the project has been illustrated in the table below.

WBS 

Task Name 

Costs 

1 

N & E Construction Limited 

$97,280.00 

1.1 

   Initiation Phase 

$11,750.00 

1.1.1 

·      Meeting with the clients to discuss the determined date and details  

 

$4,150.00 

1.1.2 

· budget summary  

$1,200.00 

1.1.3 

· Determination of the construction team and resources to be allotted  

 

$2,500.00 

1.1.4 

· Listing of the location for building the house and mapping  

 

$3,900.00 

1.1.5 

      Milestone 1: Initiation Plan  

$0.00 

1.2 

   Planning Phase 

$15,530.00 

1.2.1 

· Estimation of the project schedule and the detailed budget  

 

$2,900.00 

1.2.2 

· Distribution of the budget to the sections of the home and sharing with the potential house owners 

 

$1,500.00 

1.2.3 

· Identification and analysis of the risks – Technical, Environmental, External  

 

$3,000 

1.2.4 

· Communication and reporting structure for the team 

 

$1,240.00 

 

·       Selection and finalization of house location(Luiz Lampa et al., 2017) 

 

$500.00 

1.2.5

· Procurement of the necessary equipment and resources 

 

$1,300.00 

1.2.6

· Beginning working on housing construction 

 

$5,090.00 

1.3

      Milestone 2: Project Plan  

$0.00 

1.3.1

   Event Execution & Monitoring  

 

1.3.2 

Foundation  

· Dig out the Layout  

· Lay block and steel 

· Run water Lines and electrical pipes 

· Pour Concrete 

$16,750.00 

1.3.3

7. Layout Structure  

· Lay Structure Blocks 

· Tie Steel and pour concrete  

 

$6,000.00 

1.4

· Build Roof 

 

$25,000.00 

 1.5

   Paint 

· Interior and Exterior Walls 

· Install cabinets and bathroom appliances 

· Install Furniture  

 

$7,000 

 1.6

      Milestone 3: Constructing the House 

$0.00 

1.6.1

   Closure Phase 

$4,250.00 

1.6.2

      Feedback from the clients 

$1,200.00 

1.6.3 

      Performance evaluation and discussion  

$2,050.00 

1.6.4 

      Development of a Closure Report  

$1,000.00 

1.6.5 

      Milestone 4: Closure Report  

$0.00 

Project Activities, Duration, and Preceding Activities

The master schedule of the project has been designed using bottom-up estimation as the estimation technique.

The table below includes the names of the tasks, their duration, predecessors, and successors.

WBS 

Task Name 

Duration

Predecessors

Successors

1 

N & E Construction Limited 

1.1 

   Initiation Phase 

4 weeks





1.1.1 

·      Meeting with the clients to discuss the determined date and details  

 

1 week

A

1.1.2 

       budget summary  

1 week

A

B

1.1.3 

· Determination of the construction team and resources to be allotted  

 

1 week

A

C

1.1.4 

· Listing of the location for building the house and mapping  

 

1 week

B

D

1.1.5 

      Milestone 1: Initiation Plan  

0 weeks

1.2 

   Planning Phase 

12 weeks





1.2.1 

· Estimation of the project schedule and the detailed budget  

 

1 week

C

E

1.2.2 

· Distribution of the budget to the sections of the home and sharing with the potential house owners 

 

2 weeks

D

F

1.2.3 

· Identification and analysis of the risks – Technical, Environmental, External  

 

1 week

D

G

1.2.4 

· Communication and reporting structure for the team 

 

1 week

C

H

 

·       Selection and finalization of house location(Luiz Lampa et al., 2017) 

 

2 weeks

E

I

1.2.5

· Procurement of the necessary equipment and resources 

 

3 weeks

F

J

1.2.6

· Beginning working on housing construction 

 

2 weeks

H

K

1.3

      Milestone 2: Project Plan  

0 weeks

1.3.1

   Event Execution & Monitoring  

9 weeks





1.3.2 

Foundation  

· Dig out the Layout  

· Lay block and steel 

· Run water Lines and electrical pipes 

· Pour Concrete 

4 weeks

H

L

1.3.3

Layout Structure  

· Lay Structure Blocks 

· Tie Steel and pour concrete  

 

5 weeks

L

M

1.4

· Build Roof 

 

2 weeks

M

N

 1.5

Plaster Walls  

· Install Windows and doors 

· Run electric Wiring  

· Clean Up 

 

 

 

6 weeks

N

O

 1.6

   Paint 

· Interior and Exterior Walls 

· Install cabinets and bathroom appliances 

· Install Furniture  

 

7 weeks

O

P

1.6.1

      Milestone 3: Constructing the House 

0 weeks

1.6.2

   Closure Phase 

3 weeks





1.6.3 

      Feedback from the clients 

1 weeks

P

Q

1.6.4 

      Performance evaluation and discussion  

1 weeks

P

R

1.6.5 

      Development of a Closure Report  

1 weeks

R

S

1.6.6

      Milestone 4: Closure Report  

0 weeks


Guidelines for project

:

The project must be word-processed on white letter size paper neatly fastened, properly titled and formatted with the appropriate sub heading:

Font type
– Times New Roman

Font size
– 12

Line Spacing
– 2

Margins
– top and bottom 1 inch, right and left size 1 inch

Organization
– Format, Grammar, referencing etc.

(10 marks)

Page 7 of 9

Operations Management homework help

Highlight the key takeaways of the handout for your readers. (Your response should be 3–4 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the webtext, Washington Post article, or summary of the Journal of Clinical Oncology study, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

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IAdd citation

Type your response here.

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Operations Management homework help

2.1 Selected functional area #1: Marketing Management & DM

In 2020, the global craft beer market size was up to $95.23 billion (Craft Beer Market). With the spread of COVID-19 from 2020, there is no doubt that craft beer industry was affected negatively. The research shows that the craft beer market is expected to grow in the following years as negative impact of COVID 19 becomes less and less. The projected growth will be $210.78 in billion in 2028 (Craft Beer Market, 2022). What’s more, it is very possible that the market demand is going to be higher than pre-pandemic level.

In Maine, craft beer industry experienced slow development under the impact of COVID-19 pandemic. Many businesses lost the ability to bring visitors in, which caused a hit to the development. What’s worse, brewers also faced supply chain challenges, staffing shortages, and increasing costs (Crowell, Chris, 2022). In 2015, only 9.5% of all beer were sold in Maine. In 2020, the percentage increased to 14 (Crowell, Chris, 2022). Breweries business owners believe that there is room space for this industry to grow in Maine, especially in the following five years. Portland, Maine is the craft beer capital. There are over 70 breweries. Portland has been considered as a beer lover’s paradise. To show the love for beer, Portland people even organize beer festivals, beer event week, and beer holiday festival to celebrate the special moment.

It is very necessary to target at the correct customers to develop the new system of Brew Pub. We plan to target at people who meet the legal drinking age in Portland, Maine. In this target segment, no matter you are male or female, no matter you are young or old, no matter you earn much or little, you can buy a beer, taste it, and enjoy it. According to research from an analytical firm, Portland ranks No. 1 with the most breweries per 50,000 people in the United States (Lusignan, Kate, 2019). Not only local people, but also visitors are attracted to Portland for beer. With customers’ love and passion on beer, the Brew Pub can be set in any restaurants as it is a restaurant-brewery. The feature of Brew Pub is that customers can either buy beer to-go or drink at restaurant. Also, restaurants can distribute beer to off-site accounts. As long as there are customers in restaurants and bar, the sales of beer can be highly expected. We have a prediction that summer would be a season when the sales amount would reach the peak. For daily sales, we predict that sales at night and weekend would be a great scene.

The competition is from two perspectives. Firstly, the competitors we are facing are local breweries, such as microbrewery, taproom brewery, and other traditional breweries. Although many breweries were hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, there are still increasing numbers of breweries in Maine. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, there were 154 breweries. By January 2022, there has been 160 breweries (Crowell, Chris, 2022). It shows that the competition is fierce and severe. Many people have accustomed to the traditional breweries. It may take some time to attract customers’ attention to the brand-new system and build interest in the new system. Secondly, there will be competition from existing Brew Pub service. For example, Gritty McDuff’s Brew Pub, Liquid Riot Bottling Company, Brickyard Hollow are some of the restaurants with Brew Pub systems in Portland Maine. Some customers may have already had their own favorite Brew Pubs. We need some more efforts to get their attention and encourage their purchase. As a new entrant in the business industry, reducing costs to set low price will be a good method to attract customers. Additionally, the taste of beer will be a good and innovative selling point to attract customers’ attention. In other words, we can use innovative beer taste to encourage more and more customers to come and try and make a purchase.

References:

Craft Beer Market Size, Share & COVID-19 Impact Analysis. (2022). Fortune Business Insight. Retrieved from https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/industry-reports/craft-beer-market-100736

Crowell, Chris. (2022). Pandemic slowed Maine’s beer industry, but recovery is brewing, study shows. Retrieved from https://www.craftbrewingbusiness.com/news/pandemic-slowed-maines-beer-industry-but-recovery-is-brewing-study-shows/

Lusignan, Kate. (2019). Portland claims top spot for beer, based on population. Retrieved from https://www.pressherald.com/2019/06/04/portland-claims-top-spot-for-beer-based-on-population/

2.2 Selected Functional area #2 : Financial Management and DM

SWOT Analysis 

We are in a very profitable market in a fast expanding economy. We regard our strengths as being our ability to adapt swiftly to market demands and to supply quality brew in a rising industry. Furthermore, we aspire to become a well-respected and well-known organization in our relevant field through aggressive marketing and quality management. Our core staff have extensive understanding and expertise of the local manufacturing market, which will aid in market penetration. However, we recognize our weaknesses as a medium-sized firm with limited expertise, as well as the prospect of new competition targeting our area. The following are summaries of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and dangers.

Strengths

1.Market segmentation and execution techniques that are strategic in nature.

2. Diversified market segments: maintaining independence from a single market.

3.Combination of directorial abilities. With extensive expertise in product and commercial know-how, the directors seek to collaborate on the development of corporate strategy and long-term ambitions.

4.Creation and maintenance of a robust capital foundation

5.An aggressive and targeted marketing effort with well-defined goals and methods.

Weaknesses

1.We don’t have a good reputation in contrast to our competition.

2.Introducing new organizational procedures and individuals who have never worked together before is a challenge to the corporation.

3.A small financial basis in comparison to the industry’s key players.

4.A lack of distinct distribution channels.

5.The Internet’s establishment will present technological obstacles.

Opportunities

1.Niche specific: appreciation for high-quality beer, enjoyment, and refreshment (and integration therein).

2.The new generation of individuals and families places a far higher value on appealing packaging (image conscious).

3.The current administration and specialized agencies, such as the Botswana Export Development and Investment Authority, are pushing for the export of locally created goods.

4.Internet marketing and sales are still in their infancy.

5.A growing number of international enterprises, particularly from South Africa, are interested in entering the sector.

Threats

1.The current market expansion may result in market saturation due to competition. This rivalry might arise from a number of different causes, including:

2.Established mass-market enterprises that are developing new lines and vertically integrating in order to have complete control over supply and products supplied in their particular marketplaces.

3.New marketing methods and tactics employed by well-known items and businesses.

4.Pre-existing competition

5.Other start-up businesses spawned by strong economic growth around the country.

6.Unacceptable price hikes by overseas suppliers are possible.

3.1. Selected functional area #1: Marketing Management & DM

The Data from Globe Newswire, the global craft beer market size stood at 95.23 billion dollar in 2020 and is expected to reach 102.59 billion in 2021. The global craft beer market size will reach 210.78 billion dollar in 2028 by 10.83% growth each year. There are reasons to explain why the market of craft beer is growing up so fast because rising demand from different segments of customers. Right now, the demands about lifestyles and socializing trends are growing up fast. It is common sense to get relax by drinking in the pubs and house. Also, the incorporation of CBD reduce the taste of bitter and attract more people to try beer.

Right now, Maine has 160 breweries, it is greater than pre-pandemic which are 154 breweries. There are not only open breweries on hot locations, but also on new locations. It shows local investors have confidence about economic. Overall, 92% of brewers are predicting their sales would grow over the next five years. In 2015, local beer were sold by Maine breweries are 9.4% compare to whole beer market. In 2020, the number was increased to 14% and it is keep increasing.

For our new breweries, we can use internet to advertise our breweries. First, we can use google advertisement to attract visitors which are first time come to Maine. We can also write some article with picture in google and TripAdvisor about top 10 breweries in Maine. Lots of visitors will do destination raiders before set off. Also we can become first charity brewery in Poland, Maine. We can use “donate 5% of all proceeds” as our slogan. We will also set our breweries as a pet welcome breweries to attract family with pets.

In SWOT analysis, our strength is we are more popular in young age customer, by using internet advertisement, we can attract more new customers than other breweries. Our weaknesses are we are new breweries, we have lots of disadvantages compare to old breweries. Also, because we are new, our customer loyalty will be relatively poor, and our customer service is still in the running period. Our opportunities are whole draft beer marketing is growing up, and Poland will have more and more customers. So the marketing cake is bigger, everyone can get more than before. Our threats are covid-19, we don’t know when it will finish or will it get severe. We made predictions about draft marketing are based on right now epidemic.

In What if analysis, we made hypothesis if pandemic will consist until end of 2023, we still have confidence about our booster shoot policy and we decide to develop online sales draft beers in order to help us to overcome pandemic.

Reference

Fortune Business Insights, Craft Beer Market to Hit USD 210.78 Billion by 2028; Evolving Lifestyle and Changing Lifestyle to Boost Market Growth: Fortune Business Insights™ 2022 From https://www.citationmachine.net/apa/cite-a-website/search?q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.globenewswire.com%2Fnews-release%2F2022%2F01%2F05%2F2361534%2F0%2Fen%2FCraft-Beer-Market-to-Hit-USD-210-78-Billion-by-2028-Evolving-Lifestyle-and-Changing-Lifestyle-to-Boost-Market-Growth-Fortune-Business-Insights.html%23%3A~%3Atext%3DFortune%2520Business%2520Insights%25E2%2584%25A2%2520mentions%2CUSD%2520102.59%2520billion%2520in%25202021.

Terry Stackhouse, Maine brewers tap into ‘cause marketing,’ research questions effectiveness 2021 From https://www.wmtw.com/article/maine-brewers-tap-into-cause-marketing-research-questions-effectiveness/36947818

Chris Crowell, Pandemic slowed Maine’s beer industry, but recovery is brewing, study shows 2022 From https://www.craftbrewingbusiness.com/news/pandemic-slowed-maines-beer-industry-but-recovery-is-brewing-study-shows/

Application of Decision Support tools

3.2 Functional area: Financial Management

Break-Even and What-If Analysis

We extensively used the break-even and what-if analysis tools to understand what will be the impacts of the changes we will make. Our main purpose was to reduce the total cost for this project through reducing the fixed costs like employee salaries, rent, utilities, supplies and other costs. With our variable costs adjusted, we changed our employee salaries with reference to the current average salaries. Besides this, the average office rent per square feet in Portland is $33.1. With the project requiring 200 additional square feet, we estimated the actual rent for the whole year to be $79,440. Keeping the other costs constant, our break-even for this project would be approximately five and half months.

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From our analysis, our total fixed costs were $435,744, which we considered too high as a group. We were curious to know what will happen if we increased or decreased the total fixed costs. If we were to decrease our fixed costs to 4250,000, our break-even point would be approximately 3 months with revenue to $296,694.

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However, if we were to increase our fixed costs to $600,000, our break-even point will be seven and half months with revenue of $712,066.

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To reduce the fixed cost, we had to significantly reduce employee salaries. We agreed to hire one full time salespersons, one part time office assistant, and reduced executive salaries to a quarter. Besides this, we reduced the utility, supplies and other costs. We struck a deal with our distributions so that we can cost-share the transport fees, reducing our transportation fee by half. Since our office area was small, we reduced the heat, light, and phone costs from $7,000 to $4,000. We also reduced the insurance fee from $7,000 to $5,000. On rent, we negotiated with the landlord and we managed to secure no payment increase for the next two years. Finally, we reduced our debt to $25,000 from $40,000. With all this in mind, we managed to reduce the fixed costs to $301,494. Our break-even point also reduced to approximately 4 months with revenue of $358,139.

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Operations Management homework help

8

Using Analytic Techniques to Add Meaning to Data

Devan Pouncy

Capella University

Professor: Alex Amegashie

FPX5008

April 13, 2022

General Motors Stock Analysis

Introduction

General Motors Company is a multinational automotive manufacturing organization headquartered in Detroit, Michigan. The company operates in the industry of automotive and it is traded as a GM S&P 100 component. It was founded by Charles Stewart, William C. Durant, and Frederic L. Smith in 1908 in Flint, Michigan, United States. As of 2020, the company had employed over 155000 employees, and its revenue stood at $122.5 billion (Yahoo finance, 2022). The company has four core automobile brands, including Buick, Cadillac, GMC, and Chevrolet. Along with its partners, the company designs manufactures and markets trucks, cars, and automobile parts across the globe. It also offers services related to automotive financing through its General Motors Financial Company which is among its subsidiaries. It sells trucks and cars to daily rental car entities, commercial fleet end-users, governments, and leasing organizations directly or through its dealers’ network (Reuters, 2022). Currently, the company operates in North America, the Middle East, South America, Asia Pacific, and Africa. It is ranked at position 22 on the Fortune 500 of the largest corporations in the United States by revenue. It operates in more than eight countries. During its earlier period after its establishment, it led the world market in the automaker industry for over 77 consecutive years until Toyota overtook it in 2008 (Klier and Rubeistain, 2022). The company’s vision is to reduce crashes, emissions, congestions to zero level (General Motors, 2022). One of the common competitive advantages of the company is the cost leadership strategy that it employs in its marketing strategy. The approach helps the company to offer attractive low costs and corresponding low prices of its vehicles. It operates in one of the competitive automobiles industries, with major players such as Ford Motor, Tesla Motors, Honda, and Chrysler offering it competitive pressures.

Graphical Representations of Data

Scatter plot of the highest stock price

               To create a scatter plot for the highest stock price, you select the whole column labeled High. Then, select the column labeled time. After selecting, click the Scatter on the insert tab chart command button. Select the subtype of Chart without any lines. Confirm the chart data with the organization values as presented in its stock data.

Scatter plot of the lowest stock price

Similar to the first graph, select the whole column labeled Low. Then, select the column labeled time. Click the Scatter on the insert tab chart command button. Select the subtype of Chart without any lines. Confirm the chart data with the organization values as presented in its stock data.

Histogram of the adjusted daily closing stock price

To create the histogram for the adjusted closing price, find the minimum value of the set of data from the column labeled adjusted closing price using the formula Excel’s MIN() function. Likewise, find the maximum value of the set of data using the formula Excel’s MAX() function. The, obtain the different between the maximum and minimum values as range. Open the data analysis dialog box through data tab followed by analysis commands group. From the data analysis dialog box, select the option with Histogram. The histogram dialog box will appear where you input the range obtained from the difference between the maximum value and the minimum value.

Histogram of the stock trading volume

Similarly, to create a histogram for stock trading volume, find the minimum value of the set of data from the column labeled volume using the formula Excel’s MIN() function. Likewise, find the maximum value of the set of data using the formula Excel’s MAX() function. The, obtain the different between the maximum and minimum values as range. Open the data analysis dialog box through data tab followed by analysis commands group. From the data analysis dialog box, select the option with Histogram. The histogram dialog box will appear where you input the range obtained from the difference between the maximum value and the minimum value.

Descriptive Statistics

Calculating the Mean, Median and Mode

To calculate the mean for the first graph, click on an empty cell followed by the formula AVERAGE (C2:C255). Press enter on the keyboard to display the result mean, 55.39923 for the column labeled High. Based on Medium, you select a cell where the median result will be displaced. In the selected cell, you type the formula =MEDIAN (C2:C255), which in our case was 56.755 for the column labeled High. On the other hand, to calculate the mode, you take the data into a single column for each set. For instance, one can type the data into F1 to F20 if they have one data set. In the cell that should display the mode result, type the formula MODE (F1: F20) to obtain the mode. Based on our case, the model was 57.74 for the column labeled High. Also, for the standard deviation, you calculate the mean, and for each value, you calculate the distance to the mean result. You then square the distance of each number and then find the total of the values. The answer is then divided by the number of data points. The square root is calculated to obtain the standard deviation for the obtained value. The short form in excel is by using the formula STDEV.P function, which will execute all the steps at once. The steps are followed when calculating the mean, median, mode, and standard deviation for the scatter plot of the lowest stock price, histogram of the adjusted daily closing stock price, and histogram of the stock trading volume graphs.

Summary

               A high stock price means that the company’s P/E ratio is higher, thereby making it harder for the shareholder to purchase its shares. A high stock price indicates when its stock price is at its highest level. Based on the graph, the company retained its high stock price at an average of 55.00 throughout the 52 weeks (Stock Analysis, 2022). The value never went higher or lower, thus making it easier for shareholders to identify their fate after purchasing its stock. On the other side, the company’s lowest price indicated the lowest point when it sold its stocks cheapest to the shareholders. It retained its lowest price at an average of 53.80 throughout the 52 weeks.

               The adjusted closing price amended the company stock’s closing price, which reflected the value of stock after accounting for any actions by the organization. It showed the raw price, which could be used as the cash value of the last transaction price before the market’s closure. Based on the graph, the closing price of General Motors was higher during the earliest of 2021, and it became lower as days were moving towards 2022. On the other hand, A standard deviation (or σ) measures how dispersed the data is in relation to the mean. Low standard deviation means data are clustered around the mean, and high standard deviation indicates data are more spread out. The company’s volatility of its stocks was highly conspicuous in the beginning of 2021. It earned $2.25 a share in the 2021 first quarter in comparison to 2022 first quarter (Macroaxis, 2022). The company had a volatility of 2.65 and is 2.52 times more volatile than DOW. Twenty two of all equities and portfolios are less risky than GM.  

               A price by volume, the histogram chart shows the company’s volume of shares traded over a given frame of time. The price by volume was listed on the Y-axis of the histogram, while the frequency was listed on Y-axis. Based on the graph, it is evident that most volumes throughout 2021 to 2022 were at the frequency of 7. This indicates that the point that reflects the volume of 16.9 million served as the key areas that supported and offered resistance to the company towards the end of the period.    

               In conclusion, the stock of General Motors is up to eight percent year-to-date. Although it is better than having none, the company’s stock is underperforming compared to the twenty percent gains by the S&P 500. Based on the analysis above, it is evident that a consensus target price beyond the market of $47 will reflect a 30 percent upside along with a four percent dividend. These make the organization look more compelling in purchasing its stock today. One major pro for General Motors stock is the company’s fresh new deal with the United Autoworkers, the massive union that, for many carmakers, can spell gloom or doom should a strike arise. Putting 48,000 workers back to work under a four-year deal cannot be bad for GM shareholders, who need peace of mind after a month of nervous worrying about production problems. 

References

General Motors. (2022). About US. Retrieved from;

https://www.gm.com/company/about-us

Klier, T., & Rubenstein, J. (2020). Overview of the US Automobile Industry. In New Frontiers of the Automobile Industry (pp. 41-66). Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Macroaxis. (2022). GM Stock Volatility. Retrieved from;

https://www.macroaxis.com/volatility/GM/General-Motors

Reuters. (2022). General Motors Company. Retrieved from;

https://www.reuters.com/companies/GM.N

Scott, P. (2022). General Motors’ other franchise system: Creating an effective distribution model for Frigidaire. Business History64(1), 183-200.

Stock Analysis. (2022). General Motors Co. (NYSE:GM). Retrieved from;

https://www.stock-analysis-on.net/NYSE/Company/General-Motors-Co/DCF/CAPM

Yahoo finance. (2022). General Motors Company (GM). Retrieved from;

https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/GM/history?p=GM

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Histogram

Count

< = 43 < = 48 < = 53 < = 58 < = 63 < = 68 < = 73 < = 78 < = 83 < = 88 > 88 14 21 50 81 78 10 0 0 0 0 0

Closing price

Frequency

Histogram

Count

< = 8400000 < = 8900000 < = 9400000 < = 9900000 < = 10400000 < = 10900000 < = 11400000 < = 11900000 < = 12400000 < = 12900000 > 12900000 1 1 4 3 5 8 8 11 12 8 11

Volume

Frequency

Operations Management homework help

Shrimp Shack

Final Project

Nickals Hermann

Veronica Lamb

Brandi Manning

Livny Rodriguez

Kacie Weaver

Florida State College at Jacksonville

Introduction to Management Information Systems

ISM4011

May 1, 2022

Problem Definition

Handwritten tickets causing multiple errors, incorrect orders, and incorrect charges.

Shrimp Shack facing challenges by using handwritten tickets for customer orders. The challenges that are being faced are multiple errors are taking place, incorrect orders are being received and customers are receiving incorrect charges. This is causing Shrimp Shack to not be sufficient with their order. Customers are receiving the wrong orders that they place and ultimately are unhappy as a result. Shrimp Shack is losing revenue by handwriting tickets. If a customer places an order and it is incorrect, the order will have to be re-made the correct way that the customer order it.

Shrimp Shack recently did an analysis to determine how much revenue they were losing by using a handwritten ticket system. After the completion of the analysis, it was determined that Shrimp Shack is losing an average of $3,000 per month.

Shrimp Shack customers are not happy with their experience they are having. Customers are leaving negative google reviews. Most of the reviews state how long it took to receive their orders, they are receiving the incorrect order and how incompetent the staff is by using handwritten tickets for orders. Customers have also expressed how long it takes to get through to a live person when calling to place to go orders and pick up orders. One customer stated in a review “It took over 15 minutes to get through to a live person. The phone line was either busy, or no one was picking up the phone”.

Business Solution Proposal

Shrimp Shack is encountering issues with handwritten ticket systems as to-go, and pickup orders are getting mixed up with in-house orders. Developing a personalized mobile app for Shrimp Shack would solve the incorrect order mix-up and provide the company with added benefits to enhance customers’ ordering experience and boost engagement.

Mobile apps have various options that can be implemented, from reservations, pickup, and to-go orders and making detailed dining preferences. Most diners use mobile apps to view menus and pricing quickly, look for coupons or deals, and order food to-go (Three Reasons Why Restaurants Should Offer a Mobile App, 2021).

In-app ordering increases customer flexibility and makes ordering easier. Customers do not have to compete with orders that are placed over the phone, reducing wait times and improving efficiency within the order system of the restaurant.

Shrimp Shacks mobile platform will allow users to sign in or continue as guests for quick ordering. The menu is easily accessible, and specials and coupons are centered at the top of the app for easy accessibility. When an order is placed, TO-GO is visible at the top of the ticket and is routed to printers located in the kitchen. Kitchen staff can prepare orders without disrupting front-of-house staff and servers. The orders can be placed in the designated to-go area for customer pick up.

Customers will provide payment information when placing orders online, and they will enter their bank or credit card information, and the mobile app will process with the existing merchant provider. Once the order is placed, the customer is provided with a receipt of the transaction and pickup time.

Shrimp Shack’s mobile app will supply the front-of-house and kitchen staff with printed tickets in the correct designated locations within the kitchen stations. This will reduce errors encountered with handwritten tickets and to-go order mix-ups. The business also recommends an in-house point-of-sales system to reduce further handwritten ticket errors.

References

Three Reasons Why Restaurants Should Offer a Mobile App. (2021, December 17). Hospitality Technology. https://hospitalitytech.com/three-reasons-why-restaurants-should-offer-mobile-app

Operations Management homework help

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Ministry of Education

Saudi Electronic University

image2.png

المملكة العربية السعودية

وزارة التعليم

الجامعة السعودية الإلكترونية

College of Administrative and Financial Sciences

Assignment 3

Business Ethics and Organization Social Responsibility (MGT 422)

Due Date: 30/04/2022 @ 23:59

Course Name:

Student’s Name:

Course Code: MGT

Student’s ID Number:

Semester: Second

CRN:

Academic Year:2021-22-2nd

For Instructor’s Use only

Instructor’s Name:

Students’ Grade:

Marks Obtained/Out of 10

Level of Marks: High/Middle/Low

General Instructions – PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY

· The Assignment must be submitted on Blackboard (WORD format only) via allocated folder.

· Assignments submitted through email will not be accepted.

· Students are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

· Students must mention question number clearly in their answer.

· Late submission will NOT be accepted.

· Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from students or other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks. No exceptions.

· All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism).

· Submissions without this cover page will NOT be accepted.


Learning Outcomes:

No

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

CLO-4

Illustrate the role of social responsibility in the functional areas and strategic processes of business and a comprehensive framework for analysing and resolving ethical issues and dilemmas in an organization.

CLO-6

Write coherent project about a case study or actual research about ethics.

Critical Thinking

Students could select two companies from
the Global 100
and compare how various companies approach the subject of social responsibility. Students could investigate 2 companies and prepare a report.

The Global 100 is a group based in Canada that rates companies globally on a sustainability index:
http://www.global100.org/



https://www.corporateknights.com/rankings/global-100-rankings/2022-global-100-rankings/100-most-sustainable-corporations-of-2022

Pointers for student’s reference-


Report must include-

*Introduction (250 words-2 Marks)

*Identify its key stakeholders (350 words-3 Marks)

*Critically analyse its CSR report (500 words- 4 Marks)

*Conclusion (150 words- 1 Mark)

Basic requirement for the Assignment

· Title is compulsory

· Peer reviewed journals and References should be used to support your submission

Note for students: Only covering these pointers for the essay will not guarantee awarding of full marks, please do your research well and include other content too. These pointers are just to guide you.


Instructions for preparing the Assignment:

· All students are encouraged to use their own words.

· Use Saudi Electronic University academic writing standards and APA style guidelines.

· Use proper referencing (APA style) to reference, other styles will not be accepted.

· Support your submission with course material concepts, principles, and theories from the textbook and at least two scholarly, peer-reviewed journal articles unless the assignment calls for more.

· It is strongly encouraged that you submit all assignments into the safe assignment Originality Check prior to submitting it to your instructor for grading and review the grading rubric to understand how you will be graded for this assignment.

image1.png

Operations Management homework help

9

Research Paper

Student’s Name

Institutional Affiliation

Course

Date

Literature Review for Caseworkers and Victims of Domestic Violence

Article: Intimate Partner Violence Survivors’ Unmet Social Service Needs by Ditcher and Rhodes

Abuse against a person’s partner is a prevalent kind of violence against women that is perpetrated by a husband or a personal male accomplice. Numerous women who leave an abusive relationship suffer a deterioration in their quality of life, ending up in neediness, reliant on government assistance, or being penniless. Ditcher and Rhodes (2011) estimate that more than one in four women may encounter physical or sexual assault, or stalking, at the hands of an intimate partner throughout their lives. Victimization of intimate partner violence (IPV) may result in a range of short- and long-term physical, financial, and emotional issues, and victims may have a range of associated social support requirements (Ditcher & Rhodes, 2011).

Close accomplice viciousness (IPV) is a well-known kind of violence against women that is committed by a husband or a private male accomplice. It is a legitimate general medical condition associated with positive physical, regenerative, and mental health outcomes. The global aspects of IPV are concerning, with between 15%–71% of females reporting experience IPV over their lives (Postmus, Plummer, & Stylianou, 2016). Different sorts of abuse often coexist within the same relationship; nonetheless, disclosed measures are contingent upon the terminology used, the manner in which inquiries are posed, the amount of security during meetings, and the populace’s sex norms (Nwabuzor Ogbonnaya & Kohl, 2018). IPV is often characterized as an instance of coercive behaviors in a relationship in which one partner employs methods of intensity and control over the other partner over time. Despite the abundance of literature on various forms of maltreatment, few have focused on financial maltreatment, with scholars emphasizing the need of include monetary maltreatment as a kind of IPV, given the concept of business injury, financial control, and monetary abuse.

Along with the consequences of immediate harm, research have shown that a history of IPV victimization is related with short- and long-term physical and mental health issues, as well as financial and social difficulties. IPV may result in respiratory and gastrointestinal system difficulties, as well as a variety of gynecological and chronic illnesses (Ditcher & Rhodes, 2011). Another research by Nwabuzor Ogbonnaya and Kohl (2018) looked at work sabotage among African American female victims of violent conduct at home who were residing in abusive behavior at home safe homes. The investigation discovered that perpetrators effectively interfered with unfortunate victims’ ability to support themselves by obliterating their automobiles, physically injuring or limiting them, failing to provide child care, stealing their vehicle keys and cash, and refusing to provide transportation to work. Showalter (2016) review of the writing found many examples of work-related harm, such as keeping people awake all night before job interviews, crushing clothes, inflicting visible facial wounds, immobilizing the car, trying to take the children from child care, not showing up for child care or transportation, and pestering the victim at work.

Miller defines psychological maltreatment as “remarks or actions intended to undermine the victim’s sense of important value and self-esteem.” This often involves taunting, affronts, ridicule, and public humiliation. Mental abuse includes tactics used by the perpetrator to impair the victim’s ability to reason and think, as well as creating the impression that the victim is losing his or her mind (Arslan, 2016). Child care professionals come into contact with clients who have a history of IPV, and studies indicate that this is a common occurrence in child welfare, with up to 70% co-occurrence (Mennicke et.al, 2018). Infected children have behavioral and emotional issues as a consequence of IPV. Numerous studies have shown how seeing domestic violence may be detrimental to children (An & Choi, 2019). As a result, Eccovia, a software startup, attempts to assist health and human care providers by managing cases and data. Case workers gather data to assist experts in taking action to protect children living in violent conditions.

Hester (2011) argues that levels of support and forms of empowerment for women in domestic violence situations has not developed in parallel with child protection work, and, as such, the two currently fail to mutually reinforce one another. Indeed, statutory agencies invariably overlook the complex relationship between the safety of the mother and that of the child (Kelly, 1994). Instead, there is an emergent culture of mother-blaming, in which social workers have viewed domestic violence situations as a child protection issue (Humphreys,

1999). Social workers have tended to focus on the mother’s deficiencies and failures, which, inadvertently, serve to obfuscate the male violence that generated them (Lapierre, 2008).

Radford and Hester (2006, p.9) challenge what they view as the ‘denigration of mothering’ within child protection agencies

Research has routinely demonstrated how witnessing domestic violence can be harmful to children (Holt et al., 2011). Consequently, legislation and guidance in the UK has been updated so as to aid professionals in taking action to support children living within ‘climates of violence’ (Bentovim et al., 2009, p14).

Hester (2011) contends that since levels of assistance and types of empowerment for women experiencing domestic abuse did not emerge along with child protection work, the two now do not reinforce one another. Indeed, statutory authorities generally neglect the intricate link between the mother’s safety and the child’s (An & Choi, 2019). Rather than that, a culture of mother-blaming has developed, with social workers seeing domestic violence situations as a child safety concern. Social workers have a tendency to concentrate only on the mother’s shortcomings and failings, which serves to hide the male aggression that resulted in them. Joshi, Thomas and Sorenson, (2012) speak out against what they perceive to be a ‘denigration of mothering’ inside child protective services. Through the Eccovia, it is possible to argue that a more integrated strategy to women empowerment and child protection is required in domestic abuse scenarios.

There is a lot of violence against women at home, which includes beatings and rapes, as well as other types of abuse (Stöckl et al., 2014). The average abuse 30–60 percent of women around the world is documented. Domestic violence is common among Central Asian women in Kyrgyzstan, but little is known about how abused women think, feel, and act in this country (Joshi & Childress, 2017; National Statistical Committee and UNICEF, 2014). UNDP (2019) says that family violence is a result of male-dominated social systems that make women feel like second-class citizens. Societal structures can make it hard for a woman to choose between culture and her safety. Women can choose not to have children or to make other choices that will not have big social, physical, or psychological effects. However, some of these women may do this in order to keep the peace in their home, but not for their own good.

References

An, S., & Choi, G. Y. (2019). Is TANF truly accessible and helpful? Victims’ experiences with domestic violence screening under the family violence option. Affilia34(4), 461-480.

Arslan, G. (2016). Psychological maltreatment, emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents: The mediating role of resilience and self-esteem. Child abuse & neglect52, 200-209.

Dichter, M. E., & Rhodes, K. V. (2011). Intimate partner violence survivors’ unmet social service needs. Journal of Social Service Research37(5), 481-489.

Hester, M. (2011). The three planet model: Towards an understanding of contradictions in approaches to women and children’s safety in contexts of domestic violence. British journal of social work41(5), 837-853.

Joshi, M., Thomas, K. A & Sorenson, S. B. (2012). “I didn’t know I could turncolors”: Journal of Women and Social Work. 24(3), 244-256.

Mennicke, A., Langenderfer-Magruder, L., & MacConnie, L. (2019). “It’s tricky…”: Intimate partner violence service providers’ perspectives of assessments and referrals by child welfare workers. Journal of family violence34(1), 47-54.

Nwabuzor Ogbonnaya, I., & Kohl, P. L. (2018). Profiles of child-welfare-involved caregivers identified by caseworkers as having a domestic violence problem: Then and now. Journal of interpersonal violence33(18), 2802-2825.

Postmus, J. L., Plummer, S. B., & Stylianou, A. M. (2016). Measuring economic abuse in the lives of survivors: Revising the Scale of Economic Abuse. Violence against women22(6), 692-703.

Showalter, K. (2016). Women’s employment and domestic violence: A review of the literature. Aggression and violent behavior31, 37-47.

Stöckl, H., Devries, K., Rotstein, A., Abrahams, N., Campbell, J., Watts, C., & Moreno, C. G. (2014). The global prevalence of intimate partner homicide: a systematic review. The Lancet, 382(9895), 859-865.

UNDP. (2019). Changing Minds about domestic Violence. UNDP Georgia: United Nations Development Programme.

Operations Management homework help

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Ministry of Education

Saudi Electronic University

A picture containing text, outdoor, sign  Description automatically generated

المملكة العربية السعودية

وزارة التعليم

الجامعة السعودية الإلكترونية

College of Administrative and Financial Sciences

Assignment 3

Quality Management (MGT 424)

Due Date: 04/30/2022 @ 23:59

Course Name:

Student’s Name:

Course Code: MGT424

Student’s ID Number:

Semester: Second

CRN:

Academic Year:2021-22-2nd

For Instructor’s Use only

Instructor’s Name:

Students’ Grade:

Marks Obtained/Out of 10

Level of Marks: High/Middle/Low

General Instructions – PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY

· The Assignment must be submitted on Blackboard (WORD format only) via allocated folder.

· Assignments submitted through email will not be accepted.

· Students are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

· Students must mention question number clearly in their answer.

· Late submission will NOT be accepted.

· Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from students or other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks. No exceptions.

· All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism).

· Submissions without this cover page will NOT be accepted.

3rd Assignment

Instructions to search the case study:

1. Via your student services page, log in to the Saudi Digital Library.

2. After your login with your student ID, search for the following article:

QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN PRODUCTION ENTERPRISE. CASE STUDY.

By KONIECZNA, Monika1

ISSN number: 1641-3466


Learning Outcomes:

1. Recognize the importance of quality management theory, principles, and practices applied in businesses on national and international levels. (CLO1)

2. Use quality improvement tools and practices for continuous improvement to achieve the organizational change and transformation. (CLO3)

Quality Improvement in Production Enterprise Case Study

This paper examines the different meaning of quality and its relation to the companies` continuous development efforts. In this article, the six-sigma tool as one of the common quality approach was discussed and presented intensively through a case study application in a book printing company.

Read the case study thoughtfully and answer the following questions:

1- Discuss the different quality term as presented by the author. Which one of these terms is more practical from your point of view? ( 250 – 300 words – 3.5 points)

2- Describe the printing company` production process current state. Which one of the current issues listed is more critical and why? ( 250– 300 words – 3.5 points )

3- Do you think the proposed actions for improvements are efficient? Explain. ( 200– 300 words – 3 points )


Answers

1. Answer-

2. Answer-

3. Answer-

4. Answer-

5. Answer-

Operations Management homework help

For this assignment, you will apply decision-making to the process of international human resource management as you determine which of the four final applicants to hire into a global executive position.  

You are a member of the management committee of a MNE that conducts business in 23 countries. While your company’s headquarters is located in the Netherlands, your regional offices are located fairly evenly throughout the four hemispheres. Primary markets have been in the European Union and North America; the strongest emerging market is the Pacific Rim. Company executives would like to develop what they see as a powerful potential market in the Middle East. Sales in all areas except the Pacific Rim have shown slow growth over the past two years.

At present, your company is seeking to restructure and revitalize its worldwide marketing efforts. To accomplish this, you have determined that you need to hire a key marketing person to introduce fresh ideas and a new perspective. There is no one currently in your company who is qualified to do this, and so you have decided to look outside. 

The job title is “Vice President for Global Marketing”; an annual salary of $250,000-$300,000, plus elaborate benefits, an unlimited expense account, a car, and the use of the corporate jet. The person you hire will be based at the company’s headquarters in the Netherlands and will travel frequently.

A lengthy search has turned up four people with good potential. It is now up to you to decide whom to hire. Although all the applicants have expressed a sincere interest in the position, it is possible that they may change their minds once the job is offered. Therefore, you must rank them in order of preference so that if your first choice declines the position, you can go on to the second, and so on.

First, read the biographies of each applicant. As you are doing this, rank each of them from 1 to 4, with 1 being your first choice, and explain your reasons for their ranking. 

For your essay this week, respond to the following questions using the decisions you have made with your rankings. 

1. The first section of your paper should be an overview of your rankings and reasons for your decisions.

2. Did your decision include any culturally based biases you may have—for example, feelings, personality traits, or politics in your rankings?

3. Did you make any observations that you feel would have been fully acceptable in your own culture, but were not accepted in other cultures? If so, explain.

4. What implications do you believe any of the applicant’s cultural differences would have in business dealings? In what countries or cultures? 

5. What expatriate adjustments for the candidate need to be considered? How will the company handle these? 

6. Explain the decision-making process you used to make your decisions. 

Park L.

Park L. is currently senior vice president for marketing at a major South Korean high-technology firm. You have been told by the head of your Seoul office that his reputation as an expert in international marketing is outstanding. The market share of his company’s products has consistently increased since he joined the company just over 15 years ago. His company’s market share is now well ahead of that of competing producers in the Pacific Rim.

Park graduated from the University of Seoul and has worked his way up through the ranks. He does not have a graduate degree. In addition to his native tongue, Park is able to carry on a reasonably fluent conversation in English and has minimal working knowledge of German and French.

Saya K.

Saya K. is a woman living in Malaysia. She began her teaching career while finishing her DBA (Doctorate in Business Administration) at the Harvard Business School and published her first book on international marketing ten months after graduation. Her doctoral dissertation was based on the international marketing of pharmaceuticals, but she has also done research and published on other areas of international marketing.

Two months after the publication of her book, Saya went to work in the international marketing department of a Fortune 500 company, where she stayed for the next ten years. She returned to teaching when Maura University offered her a full professorship with tenure, and she has been there since that time. In addition, she has an active consulting practice throughout Southeast Asia. In addition to fluency in Malay, English, and Japanese, Saya speaks and writes German and Spanish and can converse in Mandarin.

Peter V.

Peter had worked in a key position in the international marketing division of a US Fortune 100 company until the company pulled out of his country South Africa eight months ago. Peter has a long list of accomplishments and is widely recognized as outstanding in his field. 

Peter has a Ph.D. in computer science from a leading South African university and an MBA from Purdue’s Krannert School of Business. Peter speaks and reads English, Dutch, Afrikaans, and Swahili and can converse in German.

Joe P.

Joe is currently job hunting. His former job as head of marketing for a single-product, high-technology firm—highly specialized workstations for sophisticated artificial intelligence applications—ended when the company was bought out by Texas Instruments. 

Joe has both his undergraduate and MBA degrees from Stanford University. In addition, he was a Rhodes Scholar and won a Fulbright scholarship, which he used to support himself while he undertook a two-year research project on the marketing of high-technology equipment to Third World countries. In addition to his native English, Joe has a minimal command of French—which he admits he hasn’t used since his college days.

Your well-written paper should meet the following requirements:

· Be 6-8 pages in length, which does not include the title page, abstract, or required reference page, which is never a part of the content minimum requirements.

Operations Management homework help

This section of your handout will appear as a subsection of the Benefits section you drafted on the previous page.

To connect information about this study to the overview of benefits you already drafted, use information from the study summary to explain how mastectomies can be an early treatment option to prevent breast cancer in those who are found to have a higher risk based on genetic testing results. (Your response should be 4–5 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the summary, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

B
IAdd citation

Type your response here.

Describe the study and how data was collected for it. (Your response should be 2–3 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the summary, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

B
IAdd citation

Type your response here.

Summarize the results of the study and the conclusions made by the researchers. (Your response should be 2–3 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the summary, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

B
IAdd citation

Type your response here.

Identify a limitation of this study found by the researchers. (Your response should be 2–3 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the summary, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

B
IAdd citation

Type your response here.

Operations Management homework help

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Ministry of Education

Saudi Electronic University

A picture containing text, outdoor, sign  Description automatically generated

المملكة العربية السعودية

وزارة التعليم

الجامعة السعودية الإلكترونية

College of Administrative and Financial Sciences

Assignment-3

MGT402 – Entrepreneurship and Small Business

Deadline: 30/04/2022 @ 23:59


Course Name: Entrepreneurship and Small Business


Student’s Name:

Course Code: – MGT 402

Student’s ID Number:

Semester: II

CRN:

Academic Year: 1443/1444 H

For Instructor’s Use only

Instructor’s Name:

Students’ Grade: Marks Obtained/Out of

Level of Marks: High/Middle/Low

Instructions – PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY

· The Assignment must be submitted on Blackboard (WORD format only) via allocated folder.

· Assignments submitted through email will not be accepted.

· Students are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

· Students must mention question number clearly in their answer.

· Read carefully Grading Rubric below for specific criteria: 0-5 Marks

· Late submission will NOT be accepted.

· Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from students or other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks. No exceptions.

· All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism).

· Submissions without this cover page will NOT be accepted.

Entrepreneurship and Small Business

ASSIGNMENT -3

Submission Date by students: Before the end of Week- 13th

Place of Submission: Students Grade Centre

Weight: 10 Marks

Learning Outcome:

1. Demonstrate strong analytical skills and tools to formulate an effective Bootstrap Marketing Plan on which a small business can build a competitive edge in the marketplace.

2. Illustrate the ability to think independently and systematically on developing a viable business model

3. Outline the solid understanding of the potential of entrepreneur in today’s competitive business world.

Assignment Workload:

This assignment is an individual assignment.


Developing an E-Commerce Business Plan

The purpose of the assignment is to provide you the experience of creating a unique E-Commerce solution.  You are forming an e-Commerce company to take advantage of the opportunities in the e-marketplace and will author a Business Plan for that venture.

Your choice of firm may include any industry, business, or service. Your report can involve the sale of products or services. This report provides extreme latitude for creativity and demonstration of your mastery of course objectives, in addition to relevant topics studied through secondary available source through published reports, journals and magazine’s.

Guidelines: Your Business Plan should follow this basic outline, plus include any content unique to your choice of product or service. Your plan should demonstrate your understanding of concepts of e-commerce covered by course readings, lectures, and peer reviewed journals. Your business plan should discuss all strategies needed for the creation of an e-commerce site.

I.   Executive Summary (1 Mark) (100-200 Words)
II.  Business Description (2 Marks) (250-300 Words)
     a. Products / Services Offered
     b. Mission Statement
     c. Industry
     d. Business Goals and Objectives
     e. Business Models – Revenue and Payment Models
III. Marketing (2 Marks) (250-300 Words)
     a. Market Analysis / Market Forecast
     b. Target Markets
     c. Marketing Strategy
IV. Competitor Analysis (2 Marks) (250-300 Words)
     a. Competition
     b. Strengths and Weaknesses
     c. Competitive Advantage
V.  Conclusion (2 Marks) (250-300 Words)
VI. References (1 Marks)

Operations Management homework help

1. Getting to Know the Organization

Overview

Use the public company and department that you chose in Week 1 (Tesla). You will continue to use that company and department for each of the four assignments in this course. In this assignment, you will become familiar with the goals and statements of your chosen company, identify your chosen department, and analyze the internal factors that have an impact on the company’s success.

Research the company on its own website, via the public filings in the Securities and Exchange Commission 
EDGAR database
(https://www.sec.gov/edgar.shtml). The annual report will often provide insights that can help address some of these questions.

· You may find annual reports, or Form 10-K filings.

Instructions

Write a 5-page report in which you do the following:

· Provide a description of the company and its complete business vision and mission statements.

· Examine the business mission and vision statements of the company and identify the company’s goals.

· Identify your chosen department and assess how you as a department manager can use the mission and vision statement to help guide your department.

· Identify ethical considerations and/or challenges that impact your ability as a manager to align with the company’s vision and mission statements.

· Construct an Internal Factor Evaluation (IFE) matrix (example provided below) on your chosen company, which includes three to five internal strengths and three to five internal weaknesses. Weigh and rate each item and then calculate the total weighted score. Cite your sources for each strength and weakness.

· Analyze the total weighted score to examine the company’s strengths and weaknesses. Outline ways in which the company can expand upon its strengths and address its weaknesses.

· Use at least three quality references.


Internal Factor Evaluation (IFE) Matrix 
(http://www.maxi-pedia.com/IFE+EFE+matrix+internal+factor+evaluation) example.

This course requires the use of Strayer Writing Standards. For assistance and information, please refer to the Strayer Writing Standards link in the left-hand menu of your course. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.

The specific course learning outcome associated with this assignment is:

· Analyze an organization’s management functions for strengths and weaknesses that impact the overall effectiveness.

Operations Management homework help

Complete an analysis of QuikTrip. Assess the organizational layout, performance metrics, and the technology that is used to measure performance and connect with consumers.

Instructions

Using the 
QuikTrip
 case study, write a 6–7 page paper in which you:

1. Evaluate QuikTrip’s operations strategy and explain how the organization seeks to gain a competitive advantage in terms of sustainability.

2. Analyze how operation management activities affect the customer experience. Select two operation management challenges and provide the solutions for confronting them.

3. Examine QuikTrip’s value chain and evaluate its effectiveness to operations in terms of quality, value creation, and customer satisfaction.

4. Determine the different types of performance measurements that can be used to measure QuikTrip’s service-delivery system design. Select at least two types that can be applied and provide justifications for the selection.

5. Examine the different types of technologies applied to QuikTrip’s service operations and evaluate how the technologies strengthen the value chain.

6. Use at least two quality resources in this assignment that do not include the initial case study. Note: Wikipedia and similar websites do not qualify as quality resources.

This course requires the use of Strayer Writing Standards. For assistance and information, please refer to the Strayer Writing Standards link in the left-hand menu of your course. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.

The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:

· Analyze the impact of operational strategies and practices on a business.

Operations Management homework help

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Ministry of Education

Saudi Electronic University

A picture containing text, outdoor, sign  Description automatically generated

المملكة العربية السعودية

وزارة التعليم

الجامعة السعودية الإلكترونية

College of Administrative and Financial Sciences

Assignment 3

Project Management (MGT323)

Deadline: 30/04/2022 @ 23:59

Course Name: Project Management

Student’s Name:

Course Code:MGT323

Student’s ID Number:

Semester: II

CRN:

Academic Year:2021-22, II Term

For Instructor’s Use only

Instructor’s Name: Dr Farhat Anjum

Students’ Grade:

Marks Obtained/Out of 10

Level of Marks: High/Middle/Low

Instructions – PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY

· The Assignment must be submitted on Blackboard (WORD format only) via allocated folder.

· Assignments submitted through email will not be accepted.

· Students are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.

· Students must mention question number clearly in their answer.

· Late submission will NOT be accepted.

· Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from students or other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks. No exceptions. Atleast two Scholarly Peer- Reviewed Journals are required as references.

· All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism).

· Submissions without this cover page will NOT be accepted.

· Do not make any changes in the cover page.


Assignment Workload:

· This Assignment comprise of a Case Study and Discussion questions.

· Assignment is to be submitted by each student individually.


Assignment Purposes/Learning Outcomes:

After completion of Assignment-3 students will able to understand the

1. Defining the concepts, theories and approaches of project management. (L.O-1.1)

2. Analyze to work effectively and efficiently as a team member for project related cases. (L.O-3.1)

3. Evaluate to monitor and control the project. (L.O-3.2)



Assignment-3: Case Study & Discussion questions


Assignment Question: (Marks 10)

Please read the Case-8.3 “Tham Luang Cave Rescue.” from Chapter 8 “Scheduling Resources and Costs” given in your textbook – Project Management: The Managerial Process 8th edition by Larson and Gray page no: 304-307 also refer to specific concepts you have learned from the chapter to support your answers. Answer the following questions for Part-1, Part-2.

Part-1: Case study questions

1. How did the physical environment of the cave affect the rescue plan? Explain in 250 words (3 Marks).

2. How did the rescue team respond to the risks of the project? Explain in 250 words (3 Marks).

3. Some have called the rescue a miracle and that luck was the decisive factor. Do you agree? Explain in 150 words (2 Marks)

Part-2: Discussion questions

Please read Chapter 8 Pg-No. 279 & 281 carefully and then give your answers on the basis of your understanding.

4. Why would people resist a multi project resource scheduling system? (1 Mark) (100 words)

5. What do you think would have happened if the Washington Forest Service did not assess the impact of resources on their two-year plan? (1 Mark) (100 words).

Answers:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Operations Management homework help

2

System Development Scope Management Plan

Student Name

Course Instructor

Institutional Affiliation

Date

Introduction

This project scope management is necessary for the new system the organization is developing. The scope will be ideal for the organization to identify the necessary project requirements, deliverables, those involved in the system development process and their roles. It will also discuss the key project deliverables, constraints and WBS. The scope management will also cover bit of the system development plan and process.

Requirement for the Project

The requirements refer to system input and output tools, data, documentations and systems needed before, during and after the project completion. The requirements will be divided into three categories namely: General, input and outpoint requirements.

The general requirements include:

The first requirement for the project is the budget. The budget for the project will about $30 million. The funds will be needed for the software development; payments will cover payment to the different suppliers of different inputs needed for the software development (Al-Rubaiei et al., 2018). The budget will cover needs such as human resources acquisition, organization structure reorganization and tests processes for the system.

The second requirement will be the testing requirements such as hardware to test the software compatibility with the various systems. The hardware will also include the data servers to test for needs such as the data backup. The backup requirements will need for hardware drivers and also cloud services.

Complementary software: the new system will work in conjunction with other with other softwares hence the organization will have to lias with other software developers to complete the final software development process. The complementary software will include security software, java scripts and operating systems.

The human resources: There are various human resources needed for this software. The human resources include the staff to run the system. The staff will include IT team, businesses analysts, softwares and system auditors. The human resources will also include suppliers who provide various software input (Al-Rubaiei et al., 2018). The corporate customers who will be part of the human resources since they will help during the prototype testing stages.

Input requirements include:

According to Gobov & Huchenko (2021), These requirements are ideal for system testing and approval. The inputs will include:

· The final requirement documentation for the project.

· System development processes and drafts

· Design, development and implementation plan.

· Quality and assurance checklist and requirements,

· Populated requirement tradability matrix

· Policy letters, regulations and legal mandates requirements.

· Feasibility study to show the system compatibility and benefits

Output Requirements include:

These are the outputs required from the system development process:

· Training and manual documents

· User requirements expressed in natural language and documentation.

· Design description layout and format.

· Compatible systems and softwares.

· System security and safety requirements

· Disasters and backup recovery plan.

· User interface requirements.

· System metrics, measures and diagnostic repots.

· System approval reports.

Roles and Responsibilities

Name

Role

Responsibility

Project Manager

· Measure and verify the project scope.

· Facilitate the changes in the project scope.

· Responsible for impact assessment and change request.

· Facilitate and scheduled change and control meetings.

· Communicate the project outcomes.

Application development manager

· Provide the direction for the application and software development

· Review all the program entities to ensure they match the requirements.

· Sign all the project final application requirements.

Technical analysts

· Technical assessment of the project

· Source and ensure the hardware are compatible with the new system

· Develop hardware and complementary systems needed for the system development and performance.

· Lead various teams in charge of various projects.

System engineer/lead the system developer

· Lead various teams in charge of software development.

· Design, develop and test the current system.

· Lead the entire software development process.

· Draft the system requirement and perform technical assessment.

Business Analyst

· Collect the information about the organization, consumers, market needs the development them into a comprehensive system.

· Ensure the system meets financial budgets and remains profitable.

Database administrator

· Provide lead system developer with recommendations and suggestion n the system development.

· Support the development of system enterprise architecture and application standards.

· System testing and asses the compatibility organizational needs.

System developers

· Work with the lead system to develop different system components.

· Integrate all the system components to promote holistic integration and functionality.

· Lead various development and IT teams to develop various system components.

Project sponsor

· Review the draft requirements and approve them

· Approve the project and sigh off the successful completion.

· Approve the system development budget and other financial needs and requirements.

· Approve various project changes.

Project Steering Committee

· Receive executive briefing on the development process.

· Approve certain project changes.

Scope Definition

The system development project is ideal for the development of the organization’s new system to improve the customer services, process delivery, productivity, revenue and organization profitability.

The key project deliverables include:

· User training: The project should provide a clear documentation on how to use the system efficiently, diagnose for errors and how to fix them.

· User interface: The system should allow the computers and all the organization systems and hardware to work compatibly, efficiently without any glitches. It should work compatibly with all the computers to deliver the desired results.

· Data migration: the new system should have all the data in the old system transferred to the new storage system and have capacity to contain more data.

· Backup systems and development: This is a back up system to store the same organization to ensure the organization has some data to work on in case of any glitches and disruptions.

· System prototype: The first model of the system to be made to facilitate trials, testing and system improvement suggestions.

· Risk monitoring and control tools: These are the tools mostly softwares needed to protect the new system from issues such as cyber-attack, sabotage or fires.

· System design and layout framework: This is the outlook of how the system will look and operate after completion to ensure ease of diagnosis.

· Test results: The project should provide a complete documentation of the project results, anticipated performance and any test issues.

Project constraints: the project should cover various constraints encountered during the development of the new system. The constraints that may be covered include time, resources, system and process or development constrains.

Work Breakdown Structure

Initial WBS

Before the development of the actual system, this will be the WBS. This structure consists of processes that must be concluded before the initial system design and development begins. The WBS aims at gaining and discovering the system requirements, organization, customer and supplier needs which the system will play a significant role in correcting and resolving (Jainendrakumar, 2015). The WBS will be conducted by business analyst and organization employees. It will also be conducted by other organization stakeholders to discuss the need for a new system to deal with organization challenges.

System development WBS

After the development of the first WBS there will be a system development structure that will integrate the requirements, problems and specification into the new system. This WBS introduces the system development process, the necessary requirements at the different stages and the person in charge of the roles (Gobov & Huchenko, 2021). The system WBS will include analysis which involves analyzing the organization needs, the impacts on the organization and determining whether the system can resolve the unique needs.

The requirement specification stage will determine the resources, tools needed to complete the system development. It will also cover the auxiliary resources needed for the system operate efficiently and compatibility with all the subsystems (Gobov & Huchenko, 2021). It will determine the internal and external requirements necessary for the system development.

The next process is design which involves designing the system based on the identified organization needs, problems and requirements. It will also be ideal for indicating how the new system will fix the organization problems.

The implementation stage will involve the actual system development process. The implementation stage will also involve the various teams involved in the teams in the company. It will also involve the integration of the system with other systems such as security features, payment systems and many more (Nath & Momin, 2017). Finally, it will involve the determination of the needed hardware and running the new system alongside them. This stage will end with the creation of the system prototype.

The final two processes will involve testing the new systems and ensuring they compatible work with organization systems and they meet the required standards and solutions. The process completion will also include the development of system reports such as training manuals and other documentations.

Scope Verification

The project verification will be conducted in various ways. The verification process will be based on the project meeting certain requirements and approval by the necessary authorities. The first verification criterion is the meeting of all the organization needs, addressing all the organization challenges as identified by the requirement analysis (Moustafaev, 2014). The analysis will list out a solutions and needs checklist that the new system must meet.

The second verification criteria will be based on the system requirement standards. These requirements include the security standards, user standards and other standards. The system must have the necessary security features all implemented to protect the system. It must also meet the system features such as usability, compatibility, user friendliness and effectiveness. The system must meet all the hardware requirements and work with all of the hardware.

Finally, the last verification step will involve having the necessary system outputs. These outputs include the system manuals, diagnosis and error correction report. Other reports needed include the training manuals and many more. The last verification process will be conducted by the various personnel in charge of the system verification and approval (Moustafaev, 2014). This verification will be conducted by the sponsor, monitoring committee, program manager and system engineer.

Scope Control

This section deals with issues such as project and system changes, modifications and other needs. In case of any changes, the changes must be reexamined by the system development engineer who will approve if the change is worth or system modification is necessary. If the changes are suggested by the lower level employees in the development process, the supervisor must approve it then pass it to the project leader (Abdilahi et al., 2020). The project leader must work with the system and business analyst to determine the implications of the problem.

The changes will then be submitted to the project monitoring committee who will evaluate whether it is worth making the changes. They will then sign the changes and then pass it to the project sponsor who will have to sign on the project before any modifications.

Approval Acceptance

Approved by the:

System development engineer ………………………………………. Date………………………… Signature………………….

Project Sponsor……………………………………………………………… Date………………………… Signature…………………

Project Manager…………………………………………………………… Date………………………… Signature…………………

References

Abdilahi, S. M., Fakunle, F. F., & Fashina, A. A. (2020). Exploring the extent to which project scope management processes influence the implementation of telecommunication projects. PM World Journal, IX, 1-17.

Al-Rubaiei, Q. H. S., Nifa, F. A. A., & Musa, S. (2018, September). Project scope management through multiple perspectives: A critical review of concepts. In AIP Conference Proceedings (Vol. 2016, No. 1, p. 020025). AIP Publishing LLC.

Gobov, D., & Huchenko, I. (2021). Software Requirements Elicitation Techniques Selection Method for the Project Scope Management. In ITPM (pp. 1-10).

Jainendrakumar, T. D. (2015). Project Scope Management in PMBOK made easy. PM World Journal4(4), 1-10.

Moustafaev, J. (2014). Project scope management. CRC Press.

Nath, A., & Momin, M. M. (2017). Project scope management: A pivotal tool for project’s success. International Journal of Management, IT and Engineering4(8), 279-288.

Operations Management homework help

drop table workon;
drop table employee;
drop table project;
drop table division;

create table division
(did integer,
dname varchar (25),
managerID integer,
constraint division_did_pk primary key (did)
);

create table employee
(empID integer,
name varchar(30),
salary float,
did integer,
constraint employee_empid_pk primary key (empid),
constraint employee_did_fk foreign key (did) references division(did)
);

create table project
(pid integer,
pname varchar(25),
budget float,
did integer,
constraint project_pid_pk primary key (pid),
constraint project_did_fk foreign key (did) references division(did)
);

create table workon
(pid integer,
empID integer,
hours integer,
constraint workon_pk primary key (pid, empID)
);

/* loading the data into the database */

insert into division
values (1,’engineering’, 2);
insert into division
values (2,’marketing’, 1);
insert into division
values (3,’human resource’, 3);
insert into division
values (4,’Research and development’, 5);
insert into division
values (5,’accounting’, 4);

insert into project
values (1, ‘DB development’, 8000, 2);
insert into project
values (2, ‘network development’, 6000, 2);
insert into project
values (3, ‘Web development’, 5000, 3);
insert into project
values (4, ‘Wireless development’, 5000, 1);
insert into project
values (5, ‘security system’, 6000, 4);
insert into project
values (6, ‘system development’, 7000, 1);

insert into employee
values (1,’kevin’, 32000,2);
insert into employee
values (2,’joan’, 42000,1);
insert into employee
values (3,’brian’, 37000,3);
insert into employee
values (4,’larry’, 82000,5);
insert into employee
values (5,’harry’, 92000,4);
insert into employee
values (6,’peter’, 45000,2);
insert into employee
values (7,’peter’, 68000,3);
insert into employee
values (8,’smith’, 39000,4);
insert into employee
values (9,’chen’, 71000,1);
insert into employee
values (10,’kim’, 46000,5);
insert into employee
values (11,’smith’, 46000,1);
insert into employee
values (12,’joan’, 48000,1);
insert into employee
values (13,’kim’, 49000,2);
insert into employee
values (14,’austin’, 46000,1);
insert into employee
values (15,’sam’, 52000,3);

insert into workon
values (3,1,30);
insert into workon
values (2,3,40);
insert into workon
values (5,4,30);
insert into workon
values (6,6,60);
insert into workon
values (4,3,70);
insert into workon
values (2,4,45);
insert into workon
values (5,3,90);
insert into workon
values (3,3,100);
insert into workon
values (6,8,30);
insert into workon
values (4,4,30);
insert into workon
values (5,8,30);
insert into workon
values (6,7,30);
insert into workon
values (6,9,40);
insert into workon
values (5,9,50);
insert into workon
values (4,6,45);
insert into workon
values (2,7,30);
insert into workon
values (2,8,30);
insert into workon
values (2,9,30);
insert into workon
values (1,9,30);
insert into workon
values (1,8,30);
insert into workon
values (1,7,30);
insert into workon
values (1,5,30);
insert into workon
values (1,6,30);
insert into workon
values (2,6,30);
insert into workon
values (2,12,30);
insert into workon
values (3,13,30);
insert into workon
values (4,14,20);
insert into workon
values (4,15,40);

Operations Management homework help

Running Head: Employee Attrition Analysis Report 1

Employee Attrition Analysis Report 6

Employee Attrition Analysis Report

Every organization worldwide is being distinguished not by the machines or location but these organizations are distinguished by the talent it keeps. The human force working in the company makes a difference in any organization’s success and failure. Managing talent and employee turnover is the real challenge. More talented employees have more chances to get a better offer from different organizations; hence, they leave the company searching for a better future. The company is working on an exit strategy. The potential acquirer is looking for the human resource data and is looking to analyze the data of all the company’s human resources to decide on retaining the current employee force or hiring new employees for the company’s operations. Analysis related to human resources will be discussed below in this report.


Current Employee Demography

Non-travel: There are different employees categorized below. One of the categories is non-travel. These employees do not travel at all. There are three sub-categories: employees who are divorced and employees who are married, and single employees. Divorced employees in non-travel categories are the ones who are satisfied and very satisfied with the organization. Both of these employees have associate degrees, and the employee who has not worked in any other company before is satisfied and earns a monthly salary of 4,000 dollars per month. The employee who worked for one company before working for this organization is very satisfied, which means the work environment is more satisfying than his previous employer, and earning a salary of 3,000 per month.

An employee who is married and in the non-travel category has worked for two companies before working for this organization, has an associate degree, and earns 9,884 dollars per month. This employee is not satisfied with the organization, which might be because the employee has a better environment for work in his prior organization. An employee whose marital status is single in the non-travel category and has an education of graduation degree is satisfied with the company’s environment and has not worked in any of the organizations before, and is currently earning a salary of 4,568 dollars per month. 

Travel Frequently: There are employees in the company who travel frequently, and there are only two kinds of marital status exist in this category, the first one is married and the second one single. A married female in this category is satisfied with the organization’s job, and work environment holds a graduate degree and has worked for one organization before. The employee earns a salary of 2909 dollars per month, and the other employee in this category is made and holds high school qualifications with earnings of 5130 dollars per month. He is somewhat satisfied with the organization. The last male employee in this category holds the degree of doctorate, which is one of the highest qualifications a person can have and has worked for one company before and is now earning a salary of 9069 dollars per month. However, the employee is not satisfied with the organization, which might be because of the low salary compared to his qualification.

The single employee in this category of travel frequently earns a good salary. While the first employee earns 5,473 dollars per month and holds a high school degree or equivalent diploma, this female employee is satisfied with her job and has worked for seven different organizations before working. The second male employee of the organization in this category is satisfied with the job with a salary of 18252 dollars per month; the employee holds an undergraduate degree and has worked for one company before working for this organization. Another employee in this organization is male and earns a salary of 6499 dollars per month, but the employee is somewhat satisfied and is an undergraduate. Three employees in this category are very satisfied, and the first one is earning a salary of 17469 dollars per month with an associate degree in her hands. The second employee in this category earns a salary of 2406 dollars per month and has a doctorate qualification. The last employee in this category is a male who earns 5772 dollars per month with a graduate degree and has worked for four companies before. 

Travel Rarely:  In this category of travel rarely, there are three sub-categories according to the marital status of the employees, the first one is divorced, the second is married, and the last is single. The satisfied employees in divorced employees earn a high salary and hold graduate and undergraduate diplomas degrees. The two female employees in this category earn high salaries compared to their male colleagues. In the divorced category, only one employee is somewhat satisfied and earns a salary of 8,319 dollars per month and holds an associate degree. Three employees are not satisfied in this category because they are highly qualified, but their salaries are not high compared to their degrees.

Married employees in this category also earn good salary packages, and most of the employees are satisfied with the organization. There are only two employees in this category who are not satisfied with the organization. Single employees in the category of those who travel rarely are the employees who have worked for more than ten organizations before working for this organization and earn a good salary. However, their satisfaction level is reasonably distributed, equally distributed among different categories. This category is expected to have a high turnover because of the history of employees changing organizations frequently. 

Below are two different charts to explain the organization’s employees’ analysis.

The first chart explains all the gender and qualification and their salaries with proper bars and explanations, and it is also easy to analyze employees’ previous organizations. While figure 2-1 explains all the categories from a single click as all the employees have different satisfaction categories and this chart gives a clear view of the satisfaction level of different employees.

Figure 1-1 Analysis of gender, qualifications, and income.

Tableau Public - book 4

Figure 2-1 Snap shot for the entire organization

Attrition Analysis:

Attrition analysis only focuses on employee turnover and the reasons behind an employee leaving the organization or staying with the organization. 

Answer 1: The employees who left the organization have not been promoted for some time, which is why they have left the company. The average is three years, and if the employees are not promoted for three years, they are most likely to leave the country. 

Answer 2: Employees below 30 years are most likely to leave the organization. They are still trying to move to a better-paying job, and age above 40 is the most likely age where employees are least likely to leave the organization. 

Answer 3: Employees tend to leave the company after working for at least five years as the experience is good enough to move to a better-paying job. 

Answer 4: If the company does frequent training for the employee, then it is least likely that the employee will leave the company as the training will improve the employee’s skills, which will motivate the employee to work for the company in the future. 

Tableau Public - book 5

Retention

The data shows that the employees who fall in the category of single marital status and travel rarely have high turnover because they have changed the companies quite frequently. These employees also have some low levels of satisfaction. The potential acquirer should focus on this category of employees to stop the high turnover. The acquirer can introduce benefit packages to motivate the employees not to leave the company and increase the retention rate for the company. The company should also focus on the work environment. 

Actionable Steps

Increase the salaries of the married employees, which will stop the employee from leaving the organization. Pay highly qualified employees good salaries so they cannot leave the company. Second, improve the work environment of the organization to increase the retention rate. Finally, arrange training workshops frequently to improve the skills of the employee. 

References

SNHU. (n. d.). Module three: Employee Attrition Data. Retrieved on April 6,2022, from https://learn.snhu.edu/d2l/le/content/1023035/viewContent/17961748/View

Operations Management homework help

Required Assessment – Human Resource Management Best Practices Paper HL340

Description (Course Guide)

Effective management of human resources has been shown to increase productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in organizations. For this assignment, students will research the best practices used by human resource departments in healthcare organizations. Using that research, students will write a 5-7 page paper (not including the cover sheet, abstract, or reference list) in APA format that includes how each of the following human resource management functions increases productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits. Inclusion of examples of actual organizations is encouraged. A minimum of five (5) professional references must be included. References should be less than five years old in order to reflect current information.

Grading Components *

% of
Grade *

Below Standard

Approaching Standard

At Standard

Exceeds Standard

APA style (citations/reference list)

10

Fails to cite and reference sources to support ideas. Paper is not in proper APA format. The majority of the resources are more than five years old.

Attempts to cite and reference credible and/or relevant sources, appropriate to the discipline, to support ideas. Portions of paper are in proper APA format. Several of the resources are more than five years old.

Almost always cites and references credible and/or relevant sources, appropriate to the discipline to support ideas. Most of the paper, including the reference list, is in proper APA format. Most of the resources are less than five years old.

Always cites and references credible and/or relevant sources, appropriate to the discipline, to support ideas. Includes more than the required number or resources. APA formatting throughout the paper is flawless. Nearly all of the resources are less than five years old.

Connection Between Best Practices and Increases

45

Student does not make a connection between the best practices used in human resource management to the increase in productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization. Student is missing two or more of the following areas of analysis: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits.

Student makes a weak connection between the best practices used in human resource management to the increase in productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization. Student is missing one of the following areas of analysis: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits. Student’s analysis and connection to research of best practices is vague, unclear, incomplete, or inaccurate.

Student makes a connection between the best practices used in human resource management to the increase in productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization. Student includes all of the following areas of analysis: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits. Student’s analysis and connection to research of best practices is clear, complete, and accurate.

Student makes a connection between the best practices used in human resource management to the increase in productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization. Student includes all of the following areas of analysis: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits. Student’s analysis and connection to research of best practices is clear, complete, and accurate. Student provides numerous examples that are backed up by research.

Style and Mechanics

15

Contains spelling, punctuation, and/or grammatical errors, so understanding is difficult. Contains numerous awkward or ungrammatical sentences, and sentence structure is simple or monotonous. Misuses words, or uses words that are too vague and abstract or too personal and specific for the topic. Student is more than one-page short of the minimum page requirement.

Contains spelling, punctuation, and/or grammatical errors which may temporarily confuse the reader, but does not generally impede the overall understanding. Sentence structure generally correct but may be wordy, unfocused, repetitive, or confusing. Uses relatively vague or general words and sometimes inappropriate words. Paper is not in the third person throughout. Student is one-page short of the minimum page requirement.

Contains minimal spelling, punctuation, and/or grammatical errors that not impede understanding. Sentences generally clear, well structured, and focused. Generally uses words accurately and effectively, but sometimes may be too general. Paper is in the third person throughout. Students meets the minimum page requirement.

Entirely free of spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors. Sentences are varied, clearly structured, carefully focused, and fits assignment’s purpose and audience. Words chosen for their precise meaning and an appropriate level of specificity is used. Paper is written in the third person throughout. Student exceeds the minimum page requirement.

Description of Best Practices and Increases

30

Student does describe the best practices used in human resource management to increase productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization. Student is missing two or more of the following areas of analysis: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits.

Student attempts to describe the best practices used in human resource management to increase productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization. Student is missing one of the following areas of analysis: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits. Student’s description of best practices is vague, unclear, incomplete, or inaccurate.

Student describes the best practices used in human resource management to increase productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization. Student includes all of the following areas of analysis: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits. Student’s description of best practices is clear, complete, and accurate.

Student provides a comprehensive description of the best practices used in human resource management to increase productivity, profitability, market value, and growth in a healthcare organization. Student includes all of the following areas of analysis: job analysis/planning, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, and compensation and benefits. Student’s description of best practices is clear, complete, and accurate. Student provides numerous examples that are backed up by research.


Total

100

 

 

 

 

Operations Management homework help

Running head: GUIDING COALITION 1

GUIDING COALTION RECOMMENDATION 2

Guiding Coalition Recommendations

           Strategic planning is a critical point in national and international companies. There are various definitions of strategic planning by different authors, and the common point is that it is a process by which strategies are made, and efforts are made to achieve the goals and objectives. Strategic planning enables the managers to decide on a better team with influential team members to achieve the goals and objectives. The present discussion is to select a team effective to increase the sales of a potential drug. The drug is new, and it takes a lot to engage the new team in the sales and marketing of a new product.

Recommendation

           Mirjam Nilsson is the organization’s president, and she has been with the organization for many years. She has a beautiful personality. The purpose of mentioning her in the discussion is not to make her part of the team, but it means that she is head of the company and has to supervise the team throughout her tenure. It is better to involve her in the different aspects like the monitoring and supervision and the guiding person. She has the stamina to guide the employees to increase effective sales.

           The first important member of the team to be involved is Satan. He is the human resource manager of the organization and is characterized as “a complacent member of human resources,” Stan is usually the point of contact assigned to company-wide committees. Formerly he was involved in a workforce deployment change initiative, with a promotion seven years ago.

Rationale 

It is risky to involve him in the team because his job satisfaction is low. He has been unsatisfied because of the few promotional opportunities in his eight-year span. The rationale would be to determine his abilities as a leader and to have the sales team is always linked with the HR team. The HR team has to decide the resources and assign important duties and responsibilities. He will report the matter to the VP of HR and lead the sales team with practical strategies to enhance sales. Their job satisfaction will increase as he is promoted to a new strategic product project. The critical factor is managing and evaluating his performance in the new project.

Chris is the organization’s sales executive, passionate about his activities. He is one of the most important members of society as the sales executive essential to the team.

Rationale 

           He has the personality of observing business matters minutely and with great detail. He is known for “micromanaging,” Chris has a realistic sense of his weaknesses and limitations. Chris led the integration of two prior acquisitions at another company and oversaw more than 150 sales reps worldwide. He has been with the organization for the last ten years, and his satisfaction level is two. The employees must be satisfied with the job because the companies are always trying to make the best opportunities for the employees. It is when the company has the opportunity to grab the employees’ attention. Chris has Leslie as his team member, and he can engage her in sales-related activities as well. All these activities are essential for the company to sell the product because they can examine the market trends (Salas, 2018).

           John Martensson is the third and most important person included in the team, and he is the manufacturing director. He knows the scientific background of the products, and he has fantastic experience dealing with different employees and making different drugs and other products. John is responsible for the scientific research behind the company’s flagship oncology drug and “does not stop until the job is done.

Rationale 

           There is no reason to keep him away from the team because he knows how the drugs are made and what is the right time to introduce them to the market. He believes that the work should not be stopped because of the increasing competition and saturation in the market. In this current project, he knows how sales can be increased and how the customers can be engaged in effective team building. He has been attached to the team for the last twenty-two years and has four satisfaction levels. He has been promoted several times, and it is good to see him in the project. It is expected that he will play an essential role in the success of an organization.

Team Building Strategies

           There are different team-building strategies in the organization, and they are as follows. Communication is an essential tool in the organization, and it is seen that if communication among the different departments does not occur, the company will be at risk. Communication among the team members helps the organization grow and increase its success. Three departments are added to the team, and all of them are experts in their duties. Combining all the teams in the project will help them communicate their ideas and grow professionally (Smith, 2018). There are other strategies to build an effective team like enhancement in growth, effective sales, better communication, and professional coordination. The goals and objectives will easily be met after the team building. It is important to mention that an effective team increases the chances of success several times. An ineffective team with a lack of coordination or communication is not suitable, and the product goes wasted. All these critical factors should be kept in mind while making the strategies for team building. In the current project, sales are the primary target, so the people in authority should focus on it (Lacerenza, 2018).

Conclusion 

           In conclusion, it is essential to mention that the team members are the strength of a company, and it cannot succeed without implementing specific strategies. It is seen in the discussion that certain employees were unsatisfied with the job, and the company has the opportunity to enhance satisfaction. The purpose was not only to look at the employees’ choices, but multiple factors were necessary. The company needs to include the manufacturing, HR, and sales representative to increase their collaboration and coordination among the members.

References

Lacerenza, C. N., Marlow, S. L., Tannenbaum, S. I., & Salas, E. (2018). Team development interventions: Evidence-based approaches for improving teamwork. American psychologist73(4), 517.

Salas, E., Reyes, D. L., & McDaniel, S. H. (2018). The science of teamwork: Progress, reflections, and the road ahead. American Psychologist73(4), 593.

Smith, T., Fowler-Davis, S., Nancarrow, S., Ariss, S. M. B., & Enderby, P. (2018). Leadership in interprofessional health and social care teams: a literature review. Leadership in Health Services.

Zhang, X. C., Lee, H., Rodriguez, C., Rudner, J., Chan, T. M., & Papanagnou, D. (2018). Trapped as a group, escape as a team: applying gamification to incorporate team-building skills through an ‘escape room experience. Cureus10(3).


Operations Management homework help

Thank you for submitting your next assessment in our course! The paper looks great so far and I look forward to reviewing the content against the criteria below. I reviewed the SafeAssign report for your paper and some of your content matches other sources word for word without being marked as paraphrases or direct quotes. Here is one example of the matching content: “For instance, its software is used to improve the corporate managerial systems of other companies. ” Another example is “The firm’s core values act as the guiding principles that ensure that the company creates a culture that aligns with its vision and mission statement.” Normally, I would need to file an academic honesty report for such instances, but I want to give you this one-time opportunity to cite all direct quotes rather than file a report. I know this was not intentional; nonetheless, an attempt to cite them must be made prior to moving forward with grading the paper.

Please revise your paper to cite all direct quotes per APA guidelines, then resubmit the paper for grading. Do not just add the in-text citation at the end of your answer; cite each direct quote with quotations and follow it immediately with an in-text citation. The citations don’t need to be perfect because I will review the paper afterwards and provide more guidance. Please also decrease the amount of research in your paper to less than 30%.

The feedback below is just a placeholder for now. I will evaluate the content of your paper against all criteria below when you resubmit it.

I look forward to you resubmitting your revised paper.

Dana

RUBRICS

CRITERIA 1

Explain the purpose and key elements of mission and vision statements.COMPETENCY

Explain the underlying principles of successful businesses.

NON_PERFORMANCEDoes not explain the purpose or identify key elements of mission and vision statements.BASICLists general elements of mission and vision statements but does not identify the key elements.PROFICIENTExplains the purpose and key elements of mission and vision statements.DISTINGUISHEDExplains the purpose and identifies key elements of mission and vision statements using real-world examples and providing supporting evidence.

COMMENTS:

Please refer to my feedback above.

CRITERIA 2

Explain the purpose and key elements of a company’s code of ethics.COMPETENCY

Explain the underlying principles of successful businesses.

NON_PERFORMANCEDoes not explain the purpose and key elements of a company’s code of ethics.BASICProvides an example of a code of ethics and lists key elements but does not explain its purpose or key elements.PROFICIENTExplains the purpose and key elements of a company’s code of ethics.DISTINGUISHEDExplains the purpose and key elements of a company’s code of ethics and why the code should be directed toward all stakeholders.

COMMENTS:

Please refer to my feedback above.

CRITERIA 3

Evaluate the effectiveness of mission, vision, and code of ethics statements.COMPETENCY

Explain the underlying principles of successful businesses.

NON_PERFORMANCEDoes not evaluate the effectiveness of mission, vision, and code of ethics statements.BASICDescribes the effectiveness of mission, vision, and code of ethics statements.PROFICIENTEvaluates the effectiveness of mission, vision, and code of ethics statements.DISTINGUISHEDEvaluates the effectiveness of mission, vision, and code of ethics statements, providing reasons for their effectiveness.

COMMENTS:

Please refer to my feedback above.

CRITERIA 4

Describe two elements to include on the mission, vision, and ethics web page of a corporate website.COMPETENCY

Examine ethical principles associated with the field of business.

NON_PERFORMANCEDoes not describe two elements to include on the mission, vision, and ethics web page of a corporate website.BASICLists elements but does not describe elements to include on the mission, vision, and ethics web page of a corporate website.PROFICIENTDescribes two elements to include on the mission, vision, and ethics web page of a corporate website.DISTINGUISHEDDescribes more than two elements to include on the mission, vision, and ethics web page of a corporate website, with rationale for each.

COMMENTS:

Please refer to my feedback above.

CRITERIA 5

Convey purpose, in an appropriate tone and style, incorporating supporting evidence and adhering to organizational, professional, and scholarly writing standards.COMPETENCY

Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for the field of business.

NON_PERFORMANCEDoes not convey purpose, in an appropriate tone and style, incorporating supporting evidence and adhering to organizational, professional, and writing scholarly standards.BASICConveys purpose, in an appropriate tone or style. Clear, effective communication is inhibited by insufficient supporting evidence or minimal adherence to applicable writing standards.PROFICIENTConveys purpose, in an appropriate tone and style, incorporating supporting evidence and adhering to organizational, professional, and scholarly writing standards.DISTINGUISHEDConveys clear purpose, in a tone and style well-suited to the intended audience. Supports assertions, arguments, and conclusions with relevant, credible, and convincing evidence. Exhibits strict and nearly flawless adherence to organizational, professional, and scholarly writing standards, including APA style and formatting.

COMMENTS:

Please refer to my feedback above.

CRITERIA 6

Organize content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions.COMPETENCY

Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for the field of business.

NON_PERFORMANCEDoes not organize content for ideas to flow logically with smooth transitions.BASICOrganizes content with some logical flow and smooth transitions.PROFICIENTOrganizes content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions.DISTINGUISHEDOrganizes content so clarity is enhanced and all ideas flow logically with smooth transitions.

COMMENTS:

Please refer to my feedback above.

SUPPLEMENTAL FEEDBACK

Operations Management homework help

Customer Orientation in business retail

power point slides : level 1- (around 10 slides )

· A short brief introduction about customer orientation in business retails (stores)

· Proper ways of customer orientation – how it’s done (bullet points)

· 2 short brief Case studies (examples or scenarios of customer orientation where you address the situation and how it was handled )

· Include images that are relatable

· Include some fun activities for the audience

Power point slides: level 2 – (around 10 slides)

· Build on level 1 and expand more and dig a little bit deeper

· Include 2 short brief Case studies

· Include some fun activities for the audience

· Make sure you make it fun and interesting (short information + images)

·

Power point slides: level 3- (around 10 slides)

· Build on level 2 and make it a little bit advanced

· Include 2 short brief Case studies

· Include some fun activities for the audience

· Make sure you make it fun and interesting (short information + images)

· Please use the attached power point slides as an example & helpful tools for you to make the slides.

Operations Management homework help

1

Strategic Plan of Walmart

Kendra Thorpe

University of Phoenix

STR/581

Anthony Barnes

March 31, 2022

Strategic Plan Walmart

Walmart is a multinational company included within the commerce of retail Corporation within the shape of the chain. The company is one of the leading associations within the world regarding retail corporations, and it has been developing well within the final few decades. The company is pointing to the pioneer within the world of retail commerce. According to Mounika et al. (2021), anticipating Walmart’s gross sales using machine learning analysis and predicting future sales is breathtaking in the current information era. One option to deal with the situation is to use machine learning to study Walmart’s information and forecast the future. The most critical part of strategic planning is sale.

The management of Walmart is very efficient and has been working efficiently. The company’s plan appears to have extraordinary scope for this company, and the extension project that has been laid, which has been detailed within the plan, is very ambitious for the company. However, it has been a long time since the company has been selecting the leading human assets to execute the arrangement and the vision and the mission articulation of the company. This is additionally slanted towards being the pioneer in retail Corporation.

The company’s ambition to position itself as the retail leader echoes its vision statement. The internal environment for Walmart incorporates the banks, representatives, shareholders, etc. The external commerce environment incorporates competitors, government, and other small-scale financial factors. Corporate social duty could be a law beneath which each association might contribute some of the profit towards the advantage of the society. Walmart has effectively included within the compliance of the corporate social obligation arrangements. As per the 2020 data issued by the company, Walmart has contributed a critical sum towards the corporate social duty, particularly providing well-being help to the needy individuals enduring from Crown.

References

Mounika, S., Sahithi, Y., Grishmi, D., Sindhu, M., & Ganesh, P. (2021). Walmart Gross Sales Forecasting Using Machine Learning. Journal of Advanced Research in Technology and Management Sciences (JAMS), 3(4), 22-27.

Operations Management homework help

Instructions: You are going to compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of a paper- based shipping container, a wood-based shipping container and a plastic-based shipping container for use as a distribution package (a non-retail shipping package). You must consider the entire supply chain in your response. Ensure your assignment is in APA format and must include a properly formatted reference list. Your paper must be 1000-1200 words, excluding title page and reference page. Ensure your assignment is posted as a word document attachment.

Operations Management homework help

Operations Management homework help

The purpose of this exercise is to discuss the situation facing the manager and help her determine an inventory ordering policy from the information given.

Keith Mason owns three bars in Oceanside CA located on the boardwalk. In September 2019, Keith hired Susan Warton as the Business Manager to take care of accounting and inventory. Her salary is $40,000 which works out to about $20 per hour.

After her first six months at work, Keith is dissatisfied with her performance. Susan seems to be spending so much time taking care of the inventory that the books are always late. Although Susan has been using standard ordering policies (set in 2011), she claims that very often she finds herself dealing with rush orders to avoid stock outs. In most cases, rush orders mean compromising on quality and settling for lesser known brands. This results in a number of dissatisfied customers, and it also meant that Keith still had to take care of many accounting tasks. He had felt that with Susan taking care of running the bars, he would have more time for his family and fishing. Before making a decision on whether to retain Susan, Keith thought he should get another opinion on the inventory problem.

Megan Mason (Keith’s niece) has just finished a course in Operations Management. Keith offered to sponsor Megan’s summer vacation in Oceanside if she would help to study the ordering policies for the bars. Realizing that the inventory policies should be based on demand, Megan first studied the weekly demand for 2018-2019 and forecasted the annual demand for the major items based on 52 weeks per year. Three of these are listed on the next page.

Discussions with Susan revealed that orders were placed for each item when it reached its reorder point. She used the order and reorder points estimated by the previous stock manager. Susan estimated that orders must be placed three weeks in advance in order to purchase and receive the correct brand. She spends about 30 minutes checking stock each time an order is placed. A study of the inventory records indicates that about 3% of the material are discarded due to spillage and broken bottles. Keith Mason pays 9% interest on the debts for his business.

Code Borough Name Inner/ Outer London GLA Population Estimate 2017 GLA Household Estimate 2017 Inland Area (Hectares) Population density (per hectare) 2017 Average Age, 2017 Proportion of population aged 0-15, 2015 Proportion of population of working-age, 2015 Proportion of population aged 65 and over, 2015 Net internal migration (2015) Net international migration (2015) Net natural change (2015) % of resident population born abroad (2015) Largest migrant population by country of birth (2011) % of largest migrant population (2011) Second largest migrant population by country of birth (2011) % of second largest migrant population (2011) Third largest migrant population by country of birth (2011) % of third largest migrant population (2011) % of population from BAME groups (2016) % people aged 3+ whose main language is not English (2011 Census) Overseas nationals entering the UK (NINo), (2015/16) New migrant (NINo) rates, (2015/16) Largest migrant population arrived during 2015/16 Second largest migrant population arrived during 2015/16 Third largest migrant population arrived during 2015/16 Employment rate (%) (2015) Male employment rate (2015) Female employment rate (2015) Unemployment rate (2015) Youth Unemployment (claimant) rate 18-24 (Dec-15) Proportion of 16-18 year olds who are NEET (%) (2014) Proportion of the working-age population who claim out-of-work benefits (%) (May-2016) % working-age with a disability (2015) Proportion of working age people with no qualifications (%) 2015 Proportion of working age with degree or equivalent and above (%) 2015 Gross Annual Pay, (2016) Gross Annual Pay – Male (2016) Gross Annual Pay – Female (2016) Modelled Household median income estimates 2012/13 % adults that volunteered in past 12 months (2010/11 to 2012/13) Number of jobs by workplace (2014) % of employment that is in public sector (2014) Jobs Density, 2015 Number of active businesses, 2015 Two-year business survival rates (started in 2013) Crime rates per thousand population 2014/15 Fires per thousand population (2014) Ambulance incidents per hundred population (2014) Median House Price, 2015 Average Band D Council Tax charge (£), 2015/16 New Homes (net) 2015/16 (provisional) Homes Owned outright, (2014) % Being bought with mortgage or loan, (2014) % Rented from Local Authority or Housing Association, (2014) % Rented from Private landlord, (2014) % % of area that is Greenspace, 2005 Total carbon emissions (2014) Household Waste Recycling Rate, 2014/15 Number of cars, (2011 Census) Number of cars per household, (2011 Census) % of adults who cycle at least once per month, 2014/15 Average Public Transport Accessibility score, 2014 Achievement of 5 or more A*- C grades at GCSE or equivalent including English and Maths, 2013/14 Rates of Children Looked After (2016) % of pupils whose first language is not English (2015) % children living in out-of-work households (2015) Male life expectancy, (2012-14) Female life expectancy, (2012-14) Teenage conception rate (2014) Life satisfaction score 2011-14 (out of 10) Worthwhileness score 2011-14 (out of 10) Happiness score 2011-14 (out of 10) Anxiety score 2011-14 (out of 10) Childhood Obesity Prevalance (%) 2015/16 People aged 17+ with diabetes (%) Mortality rate from causes considered preventable 2012/14 Political control in council Proportion of seats won by Conservatives in 2014 election Proportion of seats won by Labour in 2014 election Proportion of seats won by Lib Dems in 2014 election Turnout at 2014 local elections
E09000001 City of London Inner London 8800 5326 290 30.3 43.2 11.4 73.1 15.5 -7 665 30 . United States 2.8 France 2.0 Australia 1.9 27.5 17.1 975 152.2 India France United States 64.6 . . . 1.6 . 3.4 . . . . . . £63,620 . 500400 3.4 84.3 26130 64.3 . 12.3 . 799999 931.20 80 . . . . 4.8 1036 34.4 1692 0.4 16.9 7.9 78.6 101 . 7.9 . . . 6.6 7.1 6.0 5.6 n/a 2.6 129 . . . . .
E09000002 Barking and Dagenham Outer London 209000 78188 3,611 57.9 32.9 27.2 63.1 9.7 -1176 2509 2356 37.8 Nigeria 4.7 India 2.3 Pakistan 2.3 49.5 18.7 7,538 59.1 Romania Bulgaria Lithuania 65.8 75.6 56.5 11 4.5 5.7 10.5 17.2 11.3 32.2 27886 30104 24602 £29,420 20.5 58900 21.1 0.5 6560 73.0 83.4 3.0 13.7 243500 1354.03 730 16.4 27.4 35.9 20.3 33.6 644 23.4 56966 0.8 8.8 3.0 58.0 69 41.7 18.7 77.6 82.1 32.4 7.1 7.6 7.1 3.1 28.5 7.3 228 Lab 0.0 100.0 0.0 36.5
E09000003 Barnet Outer London 389600 151423 8,675 44.9 37.3 21.1 64.9 14 -3379 5407 2757 35.2 India 3.1 Poland 2.4 Iran 2.0 38.7 23.4 13,094 53.1 Romania Poland Italy 68.5 74.5 62.9 8.5 1.9 2.5 6.2 14.9 5.2 49 33443 36475 31235 £40,530 33.2 167300 18.7 0.7 26190 73.8 62.7 1.6 11.1 445000 1397.07 1460 32.4 25.2 11.1 31.1 41.3 1415 38 144717 1.1 7.4 3.0 67.3 35 46.0 9.3 82.1 85.1 12.8 7.5 7.8 7.4 2.8 20.7 6.0 134 Cons 50.8 . 1.6 40.5
E09000004 Bexley Outer London 244300 97736 6,058 40.3 39 20.6 62.9 16.6 413 760 1095 16.1 Nigeria 2.6 India 1.5 Ireland 0.9 21.4 6.0 2,198 14.4 Romania Poland Nigeria 75.1 82.1 68.5 7.6 2.9 3.4 6.8 15.9 10.8 33.5 34350 37881 28924 £36,990 22.1 80700 15.9 0.6 9075 73.5 51.8 2.3 11.8 275000 1472.43 -130 38.1 35.3 15.2 11.4 31.7 975 54 108507 1.2 10.6 2.6 60.3 46 32.6 12.6 80.4 84.4 19.5 7.4 7.7 7.2 3.3 22.7 6.9 164 Cons 71.4 23.8 0.0 39.6
E09000005 Brent Outer London 332100 121048 4,323 76.8 35.6 20.9 67.8 11.3 -7739 7640 3372 53.9 India 9.2 Poland 3.4 Ireland 2.9 64.9 37.2 22,162 100.9 Romania Italy Portugal 69.5 76 62.6 7.5 3.1 2.6 8.3 17.7 6.2 45.1 29812 30129 29600 £32,140 17.3 133600 17.6 0.6 15745 74.4 78.8 1.8 12.1 407250 1377.24 1050 22.2 22.6 20.4 34.8 21.9 1175 35.2 87802 0.8 7.9 3.7 60.1 45 37.6 13.7 80.1 85.1 18.5 7.3 7.4 7.2 2.9 24.3 7.9 169 Lab 9.5 88.9 1.6 36.3
E09000006 Bromley Outer London 327900 140602 15,013 21.8 40.2 19.9 62.6 17.5 1342 796 1445 18.3 India 1.1 Ireland 1.1 Nigeria 0.7 18.9 5.8 2,924 14.4 Romania Italy Spain 75.3 80.4 70.4 5.3 2.5 4.3 6.0 15.9 4.3 46.7 37682 42026 32491 £43,060 29.0 127800 13.9 0.6 15695 78.6 64.1 2.3 11.2 374975 1347.27 700 37.8 34.9 13.2 14.1 57.8 1180 48 153908 1.2 13.0 2.8 68.0 40 38.9 10.2 81.4 84.9 16.7 7.5 7.9 7.4 3.3 16.0 5.2 148 Cons 85.0 11.7 0.0 40.8
E09000007 Camden Inner London 242500 107654 2,179 111.3 36.4 17.3 71 11.7 -2917 7504 1618 41.4 United States 2.8 Bangladesh 2.7 Ireland 2.4 34.6 23.5 10,384 60.7 Italy France Spain 69.2 72.2 66.1 4 3.6 4.4 8.5 21.3 6.1 61.1 39796 . 36632 £43,750 21.9 377400 12.4 2.2 31385 73.6 123.5 2.7 14.8 700000 1359.66 970 18.5 15.1 34.4 32.0 24.8 1288 26.3 46601 0.5 18.8 5.7 62.7 41 25.2 16.5 81.8 86.7 16.8 7.1 7.4 7.1 3.6 21.3 3.9 164 Lab 22.2 74.1 1.9 38.7
E09000008 Croydon Outer London 386500 159010 8,650 44.7 37 22 64.9 13 -2605 2438 3164 29.4 India 3.6 Jamaica 2.5 Ghana 1.5 49.9 14.5 7,946 32.3 Romania Poland Italy 75.4 81.8 69.5 4.1 4.8 3.3 7.8 17.5 7 40.6 32696 35839 29819 £37,000 27.2 141600 20.1 0.6 15540 75.3 77.0 2.2 12.8 300000 1494.13 2040 30.8 33.6 16.7 18.6 37.1 1237 39.9 140049 1.0 12.8 3.2 57.7 86 36.7 14.1 80.3 83.6 28.4 7.1 7.6 7.2 3.3 24.5 6.5 178 Lab 42.9 57.1 0.0 38.6
E09000009 Ealing Outer London 351600 132663 5,554 63.3 36.2 21.4 66.8 11.8 -6473 4007 3404 47.4 India 7.6 Poland 6.4 Ireland 2.3 53.5 33.9 14,927 65.2 Poland Romania Italy 72.7 81.2 63.8 5.8 3.0 3 7.9 15.2 9.1 49.7 31331 32185 29875 £36,070 32.1 160500 13.6 0.7 18700 75.8 75.5 1.9 11.3 430000 1335.93 720 20.1 30.2 14.3 35.0 30.9 1342 40.1 112845 0.9 15.0 3.3 62.1 46 43.6 13.1 80.6 84.2 17.8 7.3 7.6 7.3 3.6 23.8 6.9 164 Lab 17.4 76.8 5.8 41.2
E09000010 Enfield Outer London 333000 130328 8,083 41.2 36.3 22.8 64.4 12.8 -2077 3164 2769 35.0 Turkey 4.5 Cyprus (Not otherwise specified) 3.6 Poland 1.9 42.3 22.9 9,259 43.8 Romania Bulgaria Poland 73 80.4 66 3.8 3.3 3.1 9.3 18.4 4.5 43.4 31603 35252 30222 £33,110 22.4 128800 21.7 0.6 13925 74.2 69.4 2.2 12.2 320000 1420.17 670 25.6 36.2 17.2 21.0 45.6 1245 38.5 119653 1.0 7.9 3.0 59.9 43 55.3 17.4 80.7 84.1 24.6 7.3 7.6 7.3 2.6 25.2 7.0 152 Lab 34.9 65.1 0.0 38.2
E09000011 Greenwich Outer London 280100 113964 4,733 59.2 35 21.9 67.7 10.4 -407 3366 2989 35.4 Nigeria 5.1 Nepal 1.9 India 1.7 40.3 16.9 7,002 37.6 Romania Bulgaria Italy 72.1 77.9 66.3 8.1 5.4 5 9.5 20.2 10.6 42.2 32415 35596 29833 £35,350 17.4 94700 27.3 0.5 10060 72.7 79.4 2.5 11.9 340000 1296.18 1720 19.2 26.9 34.2 19.7 34.4 1014 34.3 78185 0.8 7.7 3.4 58.8 78 44.1 17.1 79 82.5 28.1 7.2 7.6 7.2 3.4 27.7 6.1 193 Lab 15.7 84.3 0.0 37.3
E09000012 Hackney Inner London 274300 115417 1,905 144.0 33.1 20.7 72.1 7.2 -738 3359 3236 35.8 Turkey 3.6 Nigeria 2.7 Jamaica 1.8 43.6 24.1 8,927 46.0 Italy France Spain 69 72.8 65.3 5.9 4.8 3 10.7 17.9 10.8 49.2 32056 . 31919 £35,140 29.6 132800 18.1 0.7 18510 76.8 99.6 2.7 11.5 485000 1294.42 830 11.1 19.8 45.4 23.3 23.2 813 25.3 41800 0.4 25.2 4.9 60.6 53 44.2 19.7 78.5 83.3 24.7 7.0 7.3 7.0 3.8 27.0 5.8 211 Lab 7.0 87.7 5.3 39.4
E09000013 Hammersmith and Fulham Inner London 185300 83552 1,640 113.0 35.7 17.4 72.3 10.3 -3361 2926 1462 43.2 France 2.7 Ireland 2.7 Australia 2.5 33.7 22.7 9,256 71.4 Italy France Spain 77.5 80.9 74.2 4.7 2.2 2.5 8.4 12.9 4.9 67.5 38041 43845 34808 £43,820 30.5 149500 16.4 1.2 14095 73.4 113.2 2.0 12.2 730000 1003.81 370 19.1 21.8 25.9 33.1 19.1 809 20.7 43843 0.5 20.1 4.7 60.5 58 48.9 16.1 79.7 84.1 22.4 7.4 7.5 7.2 3.1 21.3 4.4 187 Lab 43.5 56.5 0.0 37.6
E09000014 Haringey Inner London 278000 115608 2,960 93.9 35.1 20 70.7 9.3 -4233 6675 2885 39.6 Poland 4.3 Turkey 4.0 Jamaica 2.0 38.2 29.7 15,144 78.5 Romania Italy Bulgaria 71.3 77.6 64.8 5.7 5.6 3.5 9.7 16.3 8.8 49.2 31063 . 29513 £35,420 29.8 91500 17.8 0.5 12675 74.4 90.2 2.1 12.3 432500 1484.01 240 18.0 24.7 33.4 23.9 25.5 773 37.3 61515 0.6 14.1 4.3 59.7 67 48.0 16.9 80.1 84.9 22.6 7.2 7.5 7.2 3.2 23.8 5.9 183 Lab 0.0 84.2 15.8 38.1
E09000015 Harrow Outer London 252300 92557 5,046 50.0 38.3 20.5 64.5 15 -3644 2833 1933 49.6 India 9.0 Kenya 4.9 Sri Lanka 4.3 61.8 28.5 10,427 65.4 Romania India Poland 73.9 83.1 64.7 4.6 2.4 1.5 5.4 13.9 4.2 47.9 33202 . 29335 £38,880 38.9 88600 14.5 0.6 15155 76.5 50.4 1.3 9.8 396150 1559.61 910 33.5 32.8 8.9 24.6 34.6 748 45.1 100326 1.2 8.3 2.9 66.4 32 57.6 9.1 82.7 86.1 11 7.3 7.4 7.3 2.7 20.2 8.5 134 Lab 41.3 54.0 1.6 40.7
E09000016 Havering Outer London 254300 104098 11,235 22.6 40.3 19.3 62.3 18.4 1710 604 785 10.9 Ireland 1.1 India 1.0 Nigeria 0.9 15.7 4.6 2,642 17.0 Romania Lithuania Poland 76.5 81.3 71.8 5.3 3.3 4 7.0 18.2 10.5 26 33398 36539 27455 £36,670 16.9 91300 20.7 0.6 10115 75.3 62.9 2.5 12.9 287500 1543.64 1010 35.2 33.9 17.2 13.8 59.3 1032 32.4 117634 1.2 7.8 2.5 59.8 42 38.9 12.6 80.2 83.9 22.8 7.4 7.7 7.2 3.3 21.8 5.9 159 No Overall Control 40.7 1.9 0.0 43.1
E09000017 Hillingdon Outer London 301000 110827 11,570 26.0 36.4 21.3 65.6 13.1 -1616 4139 2458 32.4 India 5.7 Pakistan 1.8 Ireland 1.6 45.7 18.8 6,993 35.8 Romania Poland India 73.2 80.7 65.9 5.8 2.5 2.4 6.5 17.9 8.7 40.2 33508 36107 28778 £37,040 23.8 220900 11.4 1.0 13505 75.0 76.6 2.6 14.7 350000 1388.93 710 22.2 33.0 16.6 28.2 49.2 1713 43.8 122486 1.2 12.3 2.4 62.0 49 29.6 12.3 80.4 83.9 20.5 7.4 7.7 7.3 3.5 21.1 6.4 170 Cons 64.6 35.4 0.0 36.1
E09000018 Hounslow Outer London 274200 105887 5,598 49.0 35.8 21.1 67.6 11.3 -3994 4425 2871 46.3 India 10.7 Poland 4.1 Pakistan 2.8 51.6 28.7 11,336 62.4 Romania India Poland 74.2 84.7 63.2 4.3 2.9 3.2 6.1 17.6 6.5 45.5 31001 32235 27226 £35,330 26.9 165700 11.7 1.0 13910 76.2 79.2 2.1 12.1 355000 1355.77 480 25.5 27.0 19.2 28.3 39.6 1277 34.5 94042 1.0 16.0 3.0 63.2 45 50.6 13.5 80 83.9 25 7.3 7.6 7.4 3.4 24.1 6.5 166 Lab 18.3 81.7 0.0 36.8
E09000019 Islington Inner London 231200 105038 1,486 155.6 34.8 15.9 75.3 8.8 -1480 6295 1819 36.6 Ireland 2.8 Turkey 1.8 United States 1.5 32.0 19.9 9,302 54.3 Italy France Spain 72.6 78.2 67 4.5 4.5 5.2 10.5 14.6 6.2 62.7 36592 38284 . £39,790 31.1 231500 14.5 1.5 22110 72.5 121.2 2.6 13.9 583000 1296.15 1030 15.4 23.5 35.3 25.5 12.4 878 32.8 38629 0.4 21.4 5.7 59.9 88 57.6 23.4 79 83.5 20.2 7.2 7.4 7.1 3.7 22.8 5.0 203 Lab 0.0 97.9 0.0 38.4
E09000020 Kensington and Chelsea Inner London 159000 80200 1,212 131.1 39.3 16.4 69.3 14.3 -1741 2234 1047 51.9 United States 5.0 France 4.2 Italy 2.7 30.0 28.0 7,237 66.2 Italy France Spain 68.2 76.3 60.4 4.2 3.4 3.6 7.2 14.3 5.2 65.2 . . . £55,620 31.1 143500 14.7 1.4 14350 74.5 120.9 2.0 12.7 1200000 1058.58 380 22.6 15.1 29.1 33.1 15.1 1154 25.3 44536 0.6 16.9 5.8 68.7 37 45.8 11.0 83.3 86.4 14.2 7.6 7.8 7.6 3.1 18.6 4.2 136 Cons 74.0 24.0 2.0 29.8
E09000021 Kingston upon Thames Outer London 175400 69849 3,726 47.1 37.1 19.6 67.2 13.2 -226 2547 1207 29.8 Sri Lanka 2.2 India 1.8 Korea (South) 1.4 30.4 16.4 3,205 27.5 Bulgaria Romania Poland 74.4 80.9 67.8 4.5 2.0 3.9 4.6 15.3 5.9 53.7 37979 41288 33400 £43,940 42.7 83700 17.1 0.8 8970 76.8 58.5 1.8 11.1 410000 1683.24 240 27.7 38.9 10.7 22.4 36.4 678 45.7 70421 1.1 20.4 2.9 68.6 30 39.3 7.7 82 84.6 15.3 7.3 7.7 7.4 3.3 16.9 4.9 141 Cons 58.3 4.2 37.5 43.1
E09000022 Lambeth Inner London 328900 144400 2,681 122.7 34.5 17.6 74.6 7.8 -1572 4598 3130 32.2 Jamaica 3.2 Portugal 2.3 Poland 2.3 41.5 20.3 11,259 46.5 Spain Italy Poland 78.5 82.3 74.6 5.9 4.1 2.2 8.8 16.1 6.2 65 33441 35995 30173 £38,490 31.7 184000 23.1 0.8 17280 63.8 104.6 2.5 13.3 450000 1257.35 1350 10.9 24.9 29.8 34.4 17.3 1091 28.3 66791 0.5 16.0 5.0 57.1 73 39.1 18.1 78.9 83.3 33.8 7.1 7.5 7.2 3.5 23.0 5.0 205 Lab 4.8 93.7 0.0 34.5
E09000023 Lewisham Inner London 303400 131076 3,515 86.3 35 20.6 70.1 9.3 -1536 3683 3239 34.9 Jamaica 3.5 Nigeria 3.5 Poland 1.6 47.4 16.5 7,978 38.3 Romania Spain Italy 75.9 79.6 72.4 5.7 6.0 3.5 9.8 16.5 5.8 53.3 33157 . 31641 £35,900 27.9 90000 24.8 0.4 10405 73.4 77.0 2.2 12.0 352000 1378.66 1540 16.5 31.7 28.1 23.6 22.5 825 17.1 76507 0.7 16.1 4.1 56.3 69 40.9 17.9 79 83.4 31.3 7.2 7.6 7.3 3.4 23.6 6.1 191 Lab 0.0 98.1 0.0 37.2
E09000024 Merton Outer London 208100 84201 3,762 55.3 36.7 20.6 67.2 12.2 -2060 1077 2029 37.4 Poland 3.5 Sri Lanka 3.2 South Africa 2.8 36.7 21.1 6,684 48.6 Poland Romania Bulgaria 78.8 86.3 71.4 4.6 3.9 4.3 5.7 13.5 4.7

Product

Annual Demand (Bottles)

Unit Cost ($)

Current Order Quantity

Current Reorder Point

Vodka

1630

3.20

200

40

Scotch

980

8.62

100

40

Rum

325

5.05

50

20

1. What is the cost of placing an order?

2. What is the holding cost for each type of liquor?

3. What is the optimal ordering policy (i.e., order quantity and reorder point) for each product? Assume a safety stock of 6 bottles for each item.

4. What information should Megan provide Keith to convince him that the above policy is an improvement on the current policy used? Explain why the new reorder point is better and show a comparison of the costs for the current and new order quantities for vodka, scotch, and rum.

Operations Management homework help

Operational Efficiency 2

Operational Efficiency General Motors

Name

Institution

Operational Efficiency General Motors

General Motors is a multinational corporation in the United States in the automobile industry. The company is the largest motor vehicle manufacturer based in the United States, dealing in manufacturing, designing, selling, and distributing motor vehicles and spare parts (Helper & Henderson, 2014). The company has manufacturing plants in various countries, including South Korea, Egypt, Mexico, Ecuador, Brazil, and the United States. The company is over a century old, having been founded in 1908. The company experienced financial woes and had to be bailed out in 2008. This was due to various operational issues like lack of innovation and poor strategies (Karen & Joe,2009).

Elements of Professional Efficiency

The success of General Motors has been credited to the company’s strategic plan that includes improvement of operational performance by improving supplier relationships, increasing profitability, and delivery of high-quality and innovative products (GM, 2014). The three elements of the strategic plan that covers operational effectiveness include process excellence, where the ability to deliver high-quality and innovative products, lead in product development and technology and deliver core operational efficiencies. The three elements show the organization’s operational efficiency and explain why the company has been successful for over a century. The three tasks that do not align with the operational strategy include developing high-performance work teams, delivering innovative products, and improving customer relations.

There are several weaknesses in the task that do not align with operational efficiency. The company wants to lead in product development and technology. This can only be achieved with high-performance work teams which are highly innovative. It is a weakness for an organization that has previously had employee issues, including talent recruitment. The company has to first recruit the best talent in the market before being able to develop high-performing teams.

There are weaknesses in the product development at the company. General Motors does not use a continuous improvement model when manufacturing its products. They have a system where the engineer improves the product, and the employees follow (Jindal et al., 2015). Continuous improvement helps identify problems while boosting employee engagement in the manufacturing process. Bureaucracy is another weakness among the tasks identified. The company should be able to change with the market. Other competitors have changed with the market by implementing strategies that make them more competitive. However, due to bureaucracy, the company is slow to make changes to make them more competitive in the market.

New Operational Strategy

Quality, cost, time, and flexibility are considered competitive priorities of any operation strategy. Quality is concerned with low defect rate, product performance reliability, certification, and environmental concerns (Abdulkareem et al., 2013). The operational strategy should reduce the number of recalls as General Motors will manufacture vehicles with a low defect rate. Some of the issues that have previously faced the company leading to the recall of various vehicles, will be addressed through the quality. Genera Motors can only become competitive when they can manufacture reliable vehicles in terms of performance, meeting all customers

‘ needs.

A cost leadership strategy will help identify areas where costs can be reduced (Jose & Reinaldo, 2005). The costs strategy will cover all the selling price, service cost, profit, value adds, running costs, and manufacturing costs. The company should also be able to manage the production cost, which will include all the relevant overheads, inventory, and value-adds. The cost strategy can help the company develop a competitive advantage. The company can only create a competitive advantage if the selling price of its products can compete with the competition.

The delivery aspect of the strategy will address how quickly the products will be delivered to the customer. Manufacturing lead time will be introduced to the company. This will require automating most of the functions at all the plants. The automation will include areas like inventory management, manufacturing, and sales. The system should be able to complete quick changes over operating instructions and the employees able to adapt to the physical setup of the assembly line. The company should be able to deploy resources in response to any changes in contractual agreements. The company has had a slow response to the changes in the market.

Structure of Competitive Priorities & Infrastructure of

The motor vehicle industry is highly competitive, with changes taking place. Three new enablers are aligned with the long-term plan of General Motors. These are innovation, quality products, and low cost. Innovation is critical for the long-term plan of the company. The consumer expects quality products at a low cost which can only be achieved through innovation. The pros of the enablers include ensuring productivity at the company, reduced costs in manufacturing, and an increase in turnover. However, the cons will include wastage of resources, costly and time-consuming.

References

Abdulkareem, Awwad, A. Khattab, and J. Anchor. (2013). Competitive Priorities and Competitive Advantage in Jordanian Manufacturing. Journal of Service Science and Management, Vol. 6 No. 1, pp. 69-79. DOI: 10.4236/jssm.2013.61008.

General Motor. (2014). GM Outlines Strategic Plan. Available at https://media.gm.com/Pages/news/us/en/2014/Oct/1001-gm-plan.html

Helper, S., & Henderson, R. (2014). Management practices, relational contracts, and the decline of General Motors. Journal of Economic Perspectives28(1), 49-72.

Jindal, S., Laveena, L., & Aggarwal, A. (2015). A comparative study of crisis management-Toyota v/s General Motors. Scholedge International Journal of Management & Development2(6), 1-12.

José Augusto da Rocha de Araujo & Reinaldo Pacheco da Costa. (2005). OPERATIONS STRATEGY AND COST MANAGEMENT. Journal of Information Systems and Technology Management. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2005, pp. 291-303

Karen Berman & Joe Knight. (2009). Why GM Failed. Harvard Business Review. Available at https://hbr.org/2009/06/why-gm-failed

Operations Management homework help

Running Head: WALMART PLC STRATEGIC PLAN ANALYSIS 2

WALMART PLC STRATEGIC PLAN ANALYSIS 2

WALMART PLC STRATEGIC PLAN ANALYSIS

Kendra Thorpe

University of Phoenix

STR/581

April 18, 2022


Introduction

Walmart, Inc. is a retailer and wholesaler of consumer products (Yuan et al. 2021). The organization provides a wide range of products and services at reasonable costs every day. The goal of Walmart’s strategic planning is to establish the company’s broad objectives and devise a strategy for achieving them. It entails taking a step back from the day-to-day grind of running the organization to consider where it’s going and what its top goals are.

Key Objectives

Walmart’s goal is to supply safe and inexpensive food and other goods to people across the globe, regardless of their location. The company intends to create value for the business and society by enhancing economic opportunities, environmental and social sustainability, and local communities (Phillips & Rozworski., 2019).

Market Development

Segmentation strategy aids in recognizing distinct sub-segments of clients and their evolving needs (Ching, Lepoev & Nishida., 2022). Walmart uses psychographic and demographic segmentation tactics. It understands the mindset of the consumer and recognizes that the customers desire everyday things at the cheapest possible rates. This helps the company to capture a wide range of customers hence boosting its sales.

Process Improvement

In order to meet the goals of shareholders, customers, and other stakeholders within Walmart, an internal-business-process-perspective must be taken into consideration (Ching, Lepoev & Nishida., 2022). Walmart’s management group is able to identify the main operational processes that need to be addressed through the adoption of an internal-business-process-perspective. As a result, the company gains a significant competitive edge.

Development of People

Among the things Walmart does to help people grow are competitive pay, relocation and housing for the summer, health benefits and swag. Peers and leaders are connected through cohorts, mentorship, and sponsorships, as well as by going to events together.

Product/Service Delivery

Shipments have been diverted to less congested ports because Walmart has chartered ships to do so. To avoid train delays, the business has relocated goods within the United States using less traditional modes of transportation. More than 3,000 drivers have been hired so far this year, and more are on the way. In order to improve the delivery process, the company aims at adopting latest technology in reaching out customers and addressing their concerns (Nilufer., 2020).

Key Performance Indicators

A 90-day order defect rate of less than 2 percent, an on-time shipping rate of at least 99 percent, and a valid tracking rate of at least 99 percent are some of Walmart’s most important key performance indicators.

Recommendations

Due to the large size of Walmart’s stores, the company should purchase its supplies in bulk so as to save on individual cost per item. Since the company is widely known, it should reduce its advertisement cost so as to reduce the over operating costs of the company. The company should also improve its selling strategies so as to compete favorably with its rivals in the future.


References

Ching, A. T., Lepoev, S., & Nishida, M. (2022). Charitable Donation, Market Expansion and Market Presence: The Case of Walmart. Market Expansion and Market Presence: The Case of Walmart (January 31, 2022).

Nilufer, N. (2020). Critical assessment on business strategy from aviation to retail industry during COVID-19 Pandemic: A Walmart Case. International Journal of Business Ecosystem & Strategy (2687-2293)2(2), 8-14.

Phillips, L., & Rozworski, M. (2019). The people’s republic of Walmart: how the world’s biggest corporations are laying the foundation for socialism. Verso Books.

Yuan, M., Zhang, N., & Wong, Z. G. (2021, December). Walmart China Face the Marketing Strategic Issues and What’s their Future Plan. In 2021 3rd International Conference on Economic Management and Cultural Industry (ICEMCI 2021) (pp. 2922-2926). Atlantis Press.

Operations Management homework help

Assignment 1

Title of the Assignment

By Your Name

Course Name

Professor Name

Date

Title of the Assignment: QuikTrip Case Study Analysis

Topic Introduction

In the introduction section, introduce the company (QuikTrip) and provide information about your experience with the company. Example: How many are in your area? How often do you visit their locations? Do you agree with their quality standards?

Competitive Advantage

Here you will evaluate QuickTrip’s operations strategy and explain how the organization seeks to gain a competitive advantage in terms of sustainability.

OM and the Customer

In this paragraph make sure you analyze how operation management activities affect the customer experience. Select two (2) operation management challenges and provide the solutions for confronting them.

The Value Chain

Examine QuickTrip’s value chain and evaluate its effectiveness to operations in terms of quality, value creation, and customer satisfaction.

Performance Measures

Determine the different types of performance measurements that can be used to measure QuickTrip’s service-delivery system design. Select at least two (2) types that can be applied and provide justifications for the selection.

QuickTrip’s use of Technology

Examine the different types of technologies applied to QuickTrip’s service operations and evaluate how the technologies strengthen the value chain.

Conclusion

Example: “In conclusion, there is value is in… Provide your learning from the assignment and the research.”

Sources

1. Frank Holmes. 2016. These Are the 7 Biggest US Airlines. http://www.businessinsider.com/these-are-the-7-biggestus-airlines-2016-4#1-delta-7

1. Federal Aviation Administration. 2017. Air Traffic by the Numbers. https://www.faa.gov/airtraffic/by
_the_numbers/

1. Brett Snyder. 2009. December Premium Air Traffic Down More Than 13 Percent.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/december-premium-air-traffic-down-more-than-13-percent/

NOTE: THESE ARE EXAMPLES OF SOURCE PLACEMENT. PLEASE UPDATE WITH YOUR OWN.

Operations Management homework help

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Operations Management homework help

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MGT 492 – Case Study Assignment 6 Answer the questions below

The two defense forces case studies outline various disruptions to supply chain operations and these can be categorized as breakdowns in general. However, given that all logistical challenges were in the absence of enemy engagement…

1) Could you identify the true source of supply chain disruption?

2) Consider supply chain disruptions experienced in your own organization. Perhaps poor supplier performance has influenced operations. Can you search for and provide a few clues as to what may have caused these situations at a deeper level?

Operations Management homework help

ASSIGNMENT TEMPLATE

What Is Genetic Testing?

Using information from the article on this page as well as what you’ve learned in the webtext over the past three weeks, explain genetic testing. (Your response should be 3–4 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the article, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

B
IAdd citation

Type your response here.

Explain how the test is implemented. In other words, what will the patient need to provide for the test? (Your response should be 1–2 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the article, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

B
IAdd citation

Type your response here.

Benefits

Explain why some clinicians think genetic testing might be valuable for treating patients diagnosed with, or at risk for, breast cancer. (Your response should be 4–8 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the article, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

B
IAdd citation

Type your response here.

Risks

Now explain what the drawbacks are for those who opt to have genetic testing. What bad news or discomfort are they likely to experience? (Your response should be 4–8 sentences.)

Remember, if you use any information or ideas from the article, be sure to add a citation (and include quotation marks around any exact wording).

B
IAdd citation

Type your response here.

Save Progress

Operations Management homework help

Here is that executive role.

 

It’s a search for an executive with corporate social responsibility and the person who would lead up a company’s philanthropic efforts – Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility and Philanthropy.

 

Oversees the development, socialization, and ongoing management of enterprise Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) program. Leads a team that directs philanthropic investments to support corporate signature causes and strengthen  local communities while helping to activate employee engagement, drive operational efficiencies, and elevate stakeholder engagement and connectivity; in so doing, reinforcing the authenticity of the  brand. Provides strategic counsel and executive communication support to define and achieve a vision for corporate citizenship and social impact, oversight of enterprise philanthropic investment policies, processes, and related governance, and ensures high standards of compliance and risk management associated with philanthropic investments as well as national and local civic engagement and collaboration. Serves as an officer of foundation, represents the brand with humility and expertly builds, cultivates, and maintains highly productive relationships that deepen trust with key national and local governmental, military and nonprofit leaders.

 

Job Description

 

Tasks:

Identifies and manages existing and emerging risks that stem from business activities and the job role. 
Ensures risks associated with business activities are effectively identified, measured, monitored, and controlled. 
Follows written risk and compliance policies and procedures for business activities. 
Provides executive-level leadership to a high-performance CSR strategy and citizenship team directing  enterprise philanthropic investments to positively impact military families and  local communities while helping to activate employee engagement, drive operational efficiencies and elevate stakeholder engagement and connectivity.
Provides strategic consultation and support to senior leaders and engages in key visible speaking engagements and military, community and nonprofit events representing the enterprise

Expertly builds, cultivates and maintains highly productive relationships internally as well as with key local and national community and non-profit organizations to reinforce  brand and proactively build reputation.
Understands and applies current CSR best practices while meeting requirements defined in Affiliate Agreements and Service Level Agreements (SLAs) that are in alignment with business goals and industry benchmarks; fulfill regulatory and compliance expectations and deliver value to the business and communities through philanthropic and employee citizenship programs and investments.
Accountable for overseeing and managing the budget for all corporate charitable giving activities, including governance of philanthropic investment policies and charitable contributions to fulfill Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) internal requirements, such as low-and moderate-income community development contributions; provide support for Bank Regulatory Reviews (examinations and data integrity reviews).

Responsible for ensuring every location is equipped with an extension of CR plan and support necessary to make a positive contribution to their local communities. 
Partners with key stakeholders throughout the corporation to research and understand the expectations of our members, employees and communities regarding philanthropy, employee giving, volunteerism and community involvement. 
Leads research to make recommendations for consideration potential nonprofit alliances, memberships and organizational commitments related to CSR; provide education and training on specific CSR risks, opportunities and best practices to key stakeholders.
Collaborates with Corporate Communication and Marketing to promote CSR initiatives through the development of strategic communications plans tailored to key stakeholders (employees, members, press and social media, etc.).
Promotes a culture of high performance and continuous improvement that values learning and a commitment to quality at all levels. Ensures that all staff members receive timely and appropriate training and development related to the processes and procedures required for their roles.
Oversees and drives CSR reporting efforts in alignment with company-wide goals, corporate reputation strategy and functional business priorities.
Manages relationships for external vendors that provide CR services and support. 
Builds and oversees a team of employees for assigned functional area through ongoing execution of recruiting, development, retention, coaching and support, performance management, and managerial activities.  

 

Minimum  Requirements

· Bachelor’s degree in business-related disciplines (i.e. Business, Marketing, Economics, etc.) or Public Relations, Communications, Human Resources, Corporate Social Responsibility or a related field.

· 4 additional years of related experience working with philanthropic or business programs within a large corporation beyond the minimum required may be substituted in lieu of a degree.

· 10 years of corporate social responsibility experience developing strategies for non-profit or corporate social responsibility to include foundation and corporate grantmaking experience communicating initiatives to various stakeholder and audiences.

· 6 years people leadership experience in building, managing and/or developing high-performing teams.

· Expert experience developing and delivering various, detail-oriented types of communications to senior leadership.

· Demonstrated expert experience using data/analytics to effectively make data driven recommendations to senior management.

· Expert interpersonal, communication, negotiation and written communication skills to effectively collaborate with and influence stakeholders and peers. Proven experience overseeing the management of third-party relationships and contracting.

· Deep technical expertise and a demonstrated understanding of best-practice CSR programs, and knowledge of current industry trends and practices regarding CSR and Employee Citizenship.

· Proven track record of translating an organizational vision to reality, business acumen and process excellence.

· Agile Development or Product Development experience.

· Proven leadership and ability to influence at all levels of management as well as operate as effective change agent to achieve strategic goals.

· Comprehensive knowledge of related risk management framework and policies.

· 3rd Party contracting experience.

· Certification in corporate citizenship leadership.

· Required travel up to 25%.

Operations Management homework help

image1.png

THE COUNCIL OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES OF JAMAICA

BACHELOR DEGREE COURSEWORK

SEMESTER II – JANUARY 2022

PROGRAMME:
BACHELOR IN BUSINESS STUDIES

COURSE NAME:

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

CODE:

MGMT3612

YEAR GROUP:

2

Due Date :

April 21,2022

COURSEWORK TYPE:
FINAL PROJECT – GROUP 20%

INSTRUCTION: You are required to read the assigned
scenario
and create a detailed report (plan) of your findings.


SCENARIO

According to the PMBOK 5th edition, they define a project as a 
“temporary endeavour undertaken to create a unique product, service or result
”. It also takes into account the project scope which focuses only the work that must be done to successfully complete the project on time and within budget. In order to achieve this, a 
Scope Management Plan
 must be developed.

The purpose of the Scope Management Plan is to ensure that the project is composed of all the work required, and only the work required, to successfully complete the project. It is the blueprint for how the project scope will be defined, developed, monitored, controlled and verified. 

The Scope Management Plan documents the scope management approach and roles and responsibilities pertaining to project scope. It further defines those who will be responsible for managing project scope and serves as a guide for actually managing and controlling the project scope. Project Scope Management consists of the processes detailed below.

· Plan Scope Management  

· Collection Requirements

· Scope Definition 

· Work Breakdown Structure  

· Scope Verification / Validation 

· Scope Control

As such you are required to create a

Scope Management Plan

for a

Project

of your choice. This project may be one that your business/ organization will embark on, or it may be an external project of interest. Provide details on how the project scope will be defined, developed, monitored, controlled and verified. This must also include the Inputs, Outputs & Tools and Techniques to complete the project.


(35 marks)

In-addition;

a. Identify and list the essential activities for the completion of the project
.


(10 marks)

b. Create a WBS for each activity and the total anticipated cost of the project.


(10 marks)

c. Prepare a project master schedule/table showing activities, preceding activities and expected duration of each activity.


(20 marks)


Guidelines for project

:

The project must be word-processed on white letter size paper neatly fastened, properly titled and formatted with the appropriate sub heading:

Font type
– Times New Roman

Font size
– 12

Line Spacing
– 2

Margins
– top and bottom 1 inch, right and left size 1 inch

Organization
– Format, Grammar, referencing etc.

(10 marks)

Page 3 of 3

Operations Management homework help

Signature Paper Assignment

For this assignment, please choose a publicly-traded company that you are interested in learning more about. (The company chosen is Intel Corporation which is pre-approved by the professor)

In 4-5 written pages (minimum), please respond to the following scenario:

Assume that you are an employee in Intel Corporation, and your supervisor asks that you prepare a condensed operations management manual that can be used to better analyze the company’s operations. In addition to communicating and sharing key operations management concepts in this short-written report, your supervisor also wants you to discuss some items below using real-life data from the company’s public financial reports.

Please answer the below questions:

(a) Explain the overall goals of operations management.

(b) Explain the lean operations approach and how it can be used in Intel company’s current production of its goods or services.

(c) Discuss key concepts surrounding how to manage, control, and measure ‘quality’ within Intel Corporation.

(d) Considering Intel’s impact on society, discuss why ethics and social responsibility are important in operations management.

(e) Discuss one technology that Intel can use in order to improve its operations.

(f) Find online the three most recent income statements (e.g., FY2019, FY2020, and FY2021) from Intel Corporation, and do the following:

1. For each of the three most recent years, divide COGS (Cost of Goods Sold) by Total Sales Revenue.

2. Analyze the relationship between COGS and Total Sales Revenue. Does it appear that this company is trying to implement a lean operations approach? Does it appear that the company is succeeding in its efforts? Please explain.

3. Using the three calculations of the [COGS / Total Sales Revenue] ratio, please apply the moving average technique to forecast the ratios for the next two years.

4. What do you predict will happen to the [COGS / Total Sales Revenue] ratio in the next two years? Please explain.

Paper Guidelines:

· The cover page and reference page/s are not included in the above-stated page requirement. These should be in addition to page requirements.

· Papers need to be formatted in proper APA 7th Edition style.

· Each paper requires a minimum of at least three outside peer-reviewed sources for your references (unless stated otherwise in the guidance above).

o   Acceptable/credible sources include: Academic journals and books, industry journals,  and the class textbook.

Operations Management homework help

Running Head: 4-1 Report 1

4-1 Report: Potential Alternative Buyer/Competitor Research 2

Potential Alternative Buyer/Competitor Research

The company has found success through its new cancer treatment drugs. The cancer treatment drug market is quite saturated, and the products are mainly expensive because the disease is deadly but curable. The owner of a company is looking to sell the company, and there is one potential buyer as well. Still, due to market volatility because of the pandemic and another economic slowdown, it is expected that the interested buyer will pull out of the acquisition. To counter this setback, I will advise the company about the contingency plan and discuss the financial health of the top 3 competitors or organizations in this life science market. 

North American Industry Classification Code (NAICS):

I have used the North American industry classification code website to find out competitors and potential buyers, and I have searched pharmaceutical in the keyword search bar. After the search from the website, the code is 325412. Under this section of code, the top 3 performing companies in terms of sales are Novartis Pharmaceutical Corp, Eli Lilly and Company, and Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. I have also used three criteria to identify these companies as well the international presence of the company, Annual growth in terms of sales, and work on innovation in the company. I have selected these three top companies that can be our potential buyers of all of these companies. I have chosen these criteria because the multinational companies with solid sales numbers and innovative technologies at their disposal can be good potential buyers for our company as they have strong financials to pay for the acquisition (Al‐Ubaydli & McLaughlin, 2017).

Novartis Pharmaceutical Corp:

Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation is a multibillion-dollar company, and the current market capitalization stands above 207 billion dollars. The company has a presence in almost all developed and emerging economies. The company produces nearly all kinds of medicines related to nearly every disease or virus. The company’s financial position is also solid, with a strong balance sheet and income statement. Revenue has shown a good increase recently and is currently standing at 52,877,000,000, which is not the overall highest, but there is a growth in a yearly timeframe. The recent profits have shown a significant increase which is very encouraging. The past growth rate of the company stands at 1.2% annually, which is a good number if we look at the size of the company. Cosentyx is the most selling product of the company. The company should be willing to buy a company whose cancer products are performing well in the market, allowing the company to enter this new market and earn from this opportunity. 

Eli Lilly and Company:

Eli Lilly and company is another big name in the pharmaceutical sector. The company’s current market capitalization stands above 297 billion dollars, making the company one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world. The company is listed on the New York stock exchange, and the share is currently trading at 311 dollars per share. The company is also a multinational company that manufactures and sells its products in multiple countries. The company also has strong financials, and the revenue of the company stands at 28,318,400,000, which shows an annual growth of around 15 percent. Although the cost has increased significantly, the profits seem stable, and it is expected the profit will increase in the future. The past growth of the company’s last five years stands at 17 percent per annum, and the growth for the next five years is expected to be around 6.4 percent per annum. The company’s most famous products are related to clinical depression drugs, and the company will be interested in buying our company to enter the cancer-related drugs market (Crommelin et al., 2010).

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company:

Out of these three companies I have selected, Bristol Myers is the smallest, with a market capitalization standing at 167 billion dollars. The company’s revenue growth is more than any other company I have selected in the past three years. Revenue has doubled in three years and currently stands at 46,385,000,000 dollars, and the profits of the company have also doubled if we compare the earnings of 2018. The last five years’ annual growth was around 5 percent per annum, and growth for the next five years is expected to stand at 21 percent per annum, which is an overwhelming number. The company operates in many different countries and should be interested in buying our company because of the vast revenue growth. The current growth trend will motivate the company’s management to buy our company and enter the new market of cancer-related drugs (Helešicová et al., 2018). 

Conclusion

These companies have huge growth potential and have a solid financial position with growth in revenues and profits. Every company with development and good profit numbers is looking to expand into different markets or another segment of the same market. We have a very successful drug for cancer treatment. These companies would love to enter a market with an already established product that will help the company increase its profit and annual growth of revenue. The contingency plan should be pitching these potential buyers the opportunity to add more growth to their existing business models. The focus should be on getting a reasonable or above the market price of the acquisition. After identifying the buyer, the company should focus on the acquisition process. After the pandemic, the focus shifted toward the pharmaceutical companies and their ability to fight the pandemic. All the companies like to expand. Instead of starting from the start, buying an already established business will help the organization focus on its growth and business-related activities.

References

Al‐Ubaydli, O., & McLaughlin, P. A. (2017). RegData: A numerical database on industry‐specific regulations for all United States industries and federal regulations, 1997–2012. Regulation & Governance11(1), 109-123.

Crommelin, D., Stolk, P., Besançon, L., Shah, V., Midha, K., & Leufkens, H. (2010). Pharmaceutical sciences in 2020. Nature Reviews Drug Discovery9(2), 99.

Helešicová, T., Pekárek, T., & Matějka, P. (2018). The influence of different acquisition settings and the focus adjustment on Raman spectral maps of pharmaceutical tablets. Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology47, 386-394.

Operations Management homework help

External Factor Analysis Summary Table for DigiPhone 7 (Example)

External Factors Weight Rating Weighted

Score

Comments

Opportunities

Expand optional

video

.1 3.5 .35

Many reviews mention the video quality

has been improved over the previous

model, but is still not the same quality

compared to other phones in this price

point (Amazer, 2015).

Expand markets

outside Asia

.15 4 .6 The phones manufactured in China have a

good foothold there, but are only available

outside Asia through online retailers

(Amazer, 2015).

Include Bluetooth

functionality

.05 1 .05 The phone currently lacks Bluetooth

functionality, which has become a

standard feature of phones in this class.

Integrate front

facing camera

.05 1.50 .075 This was a requested feature for the older

versions, and it finally made it to the

DigiPhone 7.

Parental Controls .05 1 .05 Not much is mentioned about built-in

parental controls for phones, but the

options are starting to emerge for parents

to have direct control over talk time,

texting, and other aspects of the phone

(Minor, 2016).

Use Wi-Fi

802.11ac

.1 2 .2 Wifi N is quickly being replaced by Wifi

802-11ac, which is up to 12x faster

(Lendino, 2015).

Threats

Recognizable

design

.05 1.0 .05 Most complaints were about their color

selection. Only black or gray are

available, and many other manufactures

are coming out with other color options

(Amazer, 2015).

Cost of

DigiPhone

.1 3 .3 The DigiPhone is marketed at the mid-

level phone section, but is missing some

key technologies that keep it from

competing with those phones. It is

competitively priced within this section.

Growth of

competition

.2 5 1 Other companies are innovating; that will

set them apart from the competition

(Crago, 2008).

Unknown

company

.05 2 .1 DigiPhone is not a household name, and

outside of smart phone enthusiasts they

External Factor Analysis Summary Table for DigiPhone 7 (Example)

Overall, Digiphone is doing better than other phones in the same market share. Their

annual stockholder report has shown shares increasing in value in the last quarter (Digiphone,

2016). The version 7 of their phone is priced aggressively within this market segment, but is also

missing some key technologies that would make it more comparable to other phones at the same

price. The company doesn’t seem to be aggressively trying to expand outside of its Asian market,

and this could translate into lost opportunities to increase revenue in a new market. They have

been available from online retailers, and the data supports the trend that Americans are shopping

online more than in stores (Greenberg, 2015). As long as they maintain their costs and online

presence, and they meet customer expectations for features and design, the company will

continue to be a market leader.

are relatively unknown. They need to

increase brand awareness.

Corporate

espionage

.05 3.5 .175 All emerging technology companies face

this threat and it costs companies

hundreds of billions of dollars annually

(Federal Bureau of Investigation, n.d.).

Negative reviews .05 3 .15 DigiPhone has been slow to respond to

consumer desires, but every version has

shown progress.

1.00 3.1

External Factor Analysis Summary Table for DigiPhone 7 (Example)

References

Amazer. (2015). Reviews of DigiPhone 7. Retrieved from

http://www.amazer.com/reviews/digiphone7.html

Crago, A. (2015, February 14). Top 5 emerging phone technologies. Retrieved from

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/emerging-phone-technologies.htm

Digiphone. (2016). 2015 annual stockholder report. Retrieved from

http://digiphone.com/stockholder_report.pdf

Federal Bureau of Investigation. (n.d.). Counterintelligence: Economic espionage. Retrieved

from https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/investigate/counterintelligence/economic-espionage

Greenberg, J. (2015, November 30). More Americans shopped online than in stores this

weekend. Wired Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.wired.com/2015/11/more-

americans-shopped-online-than-in-stores-this-weekend/

Lendino, J. (2015, April 20). What is 802.11ac Wi-Fi, and how much faster than 802.11n is it?

Extreme Tech. Retrieved from http://www.extremetech.com/computing/160837-what-is-

802-11ac-and-how-much-faster-than-802-11n-is-it

Minor, J. (2016, March 10). The best parental control apps for your phone. PC Magazine.

Retrieved from http://www.pcmag.com/roundup/342731/the-best-parental-control-apps-

for-your-phone

Operations Management homework help

Running head: APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 1

Copyright ©2019 Capella University. Copy and distribution of this document are prohibited.

Applying Analytic Techniques to Business

Learner’s Name

Capella University

Applied Business Analytics

Applying Analytic Techniques to Business

April, 2019

APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 2

Copyright ©2019 Capella University. Copy and distribution of this document are prohibited.

Microsoft Corporation

Microsoft is one of the world’s leading IT firms. With constant growth in its offerings,

Microsoft currently develops and licenses computing software, services, devices, and solutions

worldwide (Yahoo Finance, 2019). Some of Microsoft’s prominent offerings include Microsoft

Windows, which constitutes 35.5% of the market share for operating systems as of March 2019

(StatCounter, 2019), Office 365 Commercial Products and Services, available through cloud

technology, and Microsoft Azure, a cloud platform for data storage and analysis (Yahoo Finance,

2019).

Although software has been the basis of Microsoft’s success previously, in 2013, under

the leadership of Steven Anthony Ballmer, the company announced a shift in focus toward the

production of devices and services (Belanger, 2018). Consequently, there was an increased in

production of phones, tablets, personal computers, and gaming hardware including as Xbox. This

shift, however, was unsuccessful, largely because Microsoft’s strategic acquisition of all of

Nokia’s Devices and Services business proved a significant failure (Belanger, 2018).

The change in leadership from Ballmer to Satya Nadella in 2014 redirected the company

to profitable growth with a shift in focus toward business technological services and cloud

computing (Belanger, 2018). The acquisition of LinkedIn, the development of Office 365, and

the launch of Microsoft Azure generated significant profits for the company in the recent years

(Belanger, 2018). For the past 5 years, Microsoft leadership has witnessed an average growth

rate of 1.4%, and the company leaders are optimistic about generating a 7.5% increase in profits

in 2020 (Simply Wall ST, 2019). What makes Microsoft’s future really promising is its current

standing; Microsoft generated a revenue of close to 32.5 billion U.S. dollars and a profit of 8.6

APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 3

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billion U.S. dollars owing to a 76% increase in the sales of Azure and a 39% increase in sales of

surface tablets and laptops (Weise, 2019).

Graphical Representations of Data

Interpreting the Scatterplots

Figure 1.1. Scatterplot of highest stock prices of Microsoft based on data from Yahoo Finance
(2019)

Figure 1.1 depicts the trend in the highest stock prices of Microsoft from February 2018

to February 2019. The graph explains the relationship between two variables: highest stock

prices (in U.S. dollars) on the y-axis, which is the dependent variable, and time (in days) on the

x-axis, which is the independent variable. The scatterplot is linear: The highest stock prices show

an approximately positive relationship with time in 2018. The highest stock prices for Microsoft

increased in value in 2018. However, the relationship is moderately strong, as there is no

significant increase in the value of the highest stock prices with time and there have been small

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APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 4

Copyright ©2019 Capella University. Copy and distribution of this document are prohibited.

drops in prices toward the end of 2018 and subsequent rises in February 2019. There is a

noticeable absence of significant outliers.

Figure 1.2. Scatterplot of lowest stock prices of Microsoft based on data from Yahoo Finance
(2019)

Figure 1.2 presents the trends in Microsoft’s lowest stock prices from February 2018 to

February 2019. The graph depicts the relationship between lowest stock prices (in U.S. dollars)

on the y-axis, the dependent variable, and time (in days) on the x-axis, the independent variable.

The scatterplot presents a moderately positive relationship between the lowest stock prices and

time. The value of the lowest stock prices increased for approximately seven months from March

to October, with small drops and recoveries between October and December. The scatterplot

takes a positive linear form with a small slope, indicating low volatility in the lowest stock

prices. The scatterplot also helps us understand that there are no significant outliers, which

confirms the stability of Microsoft’s market shares.

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APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 5

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Interpreting the Histograms

Figure 2.1. Histogram of adjusted closing stock prices of Microsoft based on data from Yahoo
Finance (2019)

Figure 2.1 presents the number of occurrences of daily adjusted closing stock prices

falling within equally distributed continuous data ranges. The ranges of adjusted closing stock

prices are marked on the x-axis, and the number of occurrences of prices falling within the

ranges of adjusted closing stock prices is marked on the y-axis. The histogram is skewed to the

left; that is, a majority of the data points fall within the higher ranges of daily adjusted closing

stock prices. This indicates that the histogram is negatively skewed with the median being

greater than the mean, indicating volatility in the adjusted closing stock prices of Microsoft in the

market.

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Frequency

APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 6

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Figure 2.2. Histogram of stock volume of Microsoft based on data from Yahoo Finance (2019)

Figure 2.2 presents the number of occurrences of Microsoft’s daily stock volumes being

bought or sold within continuous data ranges. The ranges of stock volume are marked on the x-

axis, and the number of occurrences of stock volumes falling within the ranges is marked on the

y-axis. The histogram is skewed to the right, indicating that a majority of the daily stock volume

data points fall within the lower ranges of the stock volume. This indicates that the histogram is

positively skewed with the mean being greater than the median. With 80% of the data points

falling within the lower ranges of stock volume, the histogram is strongly skewed to the right,

indicating unequal distribution and difficulty in speculating the daily stock volume of Microsoft.

Descriptive Statistics

Mean, Median, and Standard Deviation of Adjusted Closing Stock Prices

The mean, or the average value of a data set, of Microsoft’s adjusted closing stock prices

is 101.939 U.S. dollars, indicating the healthy market standing of Microsoft’s stock. It is

indicative of the company’s stable growth in revenue and profits throughout the year.

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APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 7

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While mean is the average value of a data set, median is the data point that corresponds to

the middle value in the data set. The median for Microsoft’s adjusted closing stock prices is

103.249 U.S. dollars, which is greater than the mean, indicating the presence of outliers on the

lower side of the stock prices; this highlights the prevalence of fluctuations in Microsoft’s stock

value. This difference in mean and median also indicates asymmetry in the distribution of values

for adjusted closing prices. The standard deviation for the adjusted closing stock prices is 6.953

U.S. dollars; considering that the average stock price is 101.939 U.S. dollars, the volatility is

6.7%. The standard deviation is representative of the volatility in the stock pricing and, therefore,

helps understand the level of risk involved in investing in a stock. The standard deviation

suggests the prevalence of moderate risk in purchasing Microsoft’s shares.

Mean, Median, and Standard Deviation of Daily Traded Stock Volume

The mean of Microsoft’s daily traded stock volume from February 2018 to February

2019 is 31,210,598, which is indicative of the high liquidity of the company’s stock (Seth, 2018).

Considering that a stock that is traded at fewer than 10,000 shares each day is deemed a low-

volume stock (Seth, 2018), Microsoft’s daily traded stock volume is representative of a large

number of prospective buyers and, therefore, a highly valuable publicly traded firm. The median

for the stock volume is 28,123,200, which is less than the mean. This indicates the presence of

outliers on the higher side of the data set and, therefore, shows that the company has significant

spikes in its daily tradable stock volume. The standard deviation is found to be 12,909,909.8,

which is equivalent to 41.3% of the mean for stock volume. A standard deviation of

12,909,909.8 is representative of high volatility in the data set, which shows a considerable lack

of consistency in the volume of Microsoft’s stock.

APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 8

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Conclusion

The graphical representations and statistical calculations of Microsoft’s stock history

gives valuable insights that could help management make decisions about the launch of new

products and expansion. Some important trends that leaders should be aware of are as follows:

• While there is a gradual rise in the highest and lowest stock prices for the second and

third quarter, the fourth quarter is characterized by moderate falls and recoveries in the

highest and lowest stock prices;

• More than one fourth of the adjusted closing stock prices fell within the high-value range

of 105 to 110, which is a signal of high demand;

• A volatility of 41.3% for daily traded stock volume indicates great unpredictability in the

exchange rate of Microsoft’s stock. High volatility in stock volume usually indicates

unexpected earnings by a firm or the dissemination of good or bad news about the

firm/industry in the market (Morah, 2018).

Awareness of trends in stock prices may help management decide to launch products or

upgrade offerings in the early and later parts of the year, which may create hype and push sales

during these periods; this may facilitate a further increase in gross revenue and profits during the

stable periods of the third and fourth quarters. The histogram for adjusted closing stock prices

shows that a large number of data points fall within the high-value range of 105 and 110 U.S.

dollars with significant stock volume exchanged daily. This may inspire management to double

stock volume by halving stock prices, which may help increase the demand for the stock and,

therefore, improve market capitalization for the company.

The scatterplots for the highest and lowest daily stock prices indicate a positive linear

correlation between time and stock value, which helps understand the impact of the improved

APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 9

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growth in Microsoft’s revenue in 2018 compared with preceding years. The scatterplots also

indicate better valuation of prices in the start of 2019 than in 2018; this demonstrates the impact

of the company’s quarterly performance, namely generating 32.5 billion U.S. dollars in revenue,

on its market valuation at the start of 2019. Interpreting the histograms helps understand that

while the median for adjusted closing stock prices was relatively on the higher range of the data

set, the median for stock volume was on the lower range of the data set, reflecting high demand

for Microsoft’s stocks and, at the same time, a reservation on the part of Microsoft’s

shareholders to sell. This trend coincides with the fact that Microsoft, during the period,

improved in its distribution of dividends (Weise, 2019), which could be why the rate of change

in Microsoft’s traded volume was lower than the rate of change in its stock pricing.

APPLYING ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES TO BUSINESS 10

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References

Belanger, L. (2018, April 4). 10 amazing moments in Microsoft’s history, from its founding to

desktop dominance to today. Entrepreneur India. Retrieved from

https://entrepreneur.com/article/311468

Morah, C. (2018, March 2). Are stocks with large daily volume less volatile? Retrieved from

https://investopedia.com/ask/answers/09/daily-volume-volatility.asp

Seth, S. (2018, January 10). The risks of trading low-volume stocks. Retrieved from

https://www.investopedia.com/articles/active-trading/051415/risks-trading-lowvolume-

stocks.asp

Simply Wall St. (2019). Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT): What does the future look

like? Retrieved from https://simplywall.st/stocks/us/software/nasdaq-

msft/microsoft/news/microsoft-corporation-nasdaqmsft-what-does-the-future-look-like/

StatCounter. (2019). Operating system market share worldwide. Retrieved from

http://gs.statcounter.com/os-market-share

Weise, K. (2019, January 30). Releasing earnings, Microsoft stays in stride, with cloud powering

the way. The New York Times. Retrieved from

https://nytimes.com/2019/01/30/technology/microsoft-

earnings.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FMicrosoft%20Corporation

Yahoo Finance. (2019). Microsoft Corporation (MSFT) [Data set]. Retrieved from

https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/msft/profile/

Operations Management homework help

Running Head: 5-1 MILESTONE THREE 1

STRATEGIC MILESTONE 3 8

5-1 Milestone Three: Alternative Buyer Research Report and Acquisition Road Map

Alternative Buyer Research Report

A life science organization is a type of business that deals in pharmaceuticals, research, and development or biomedical equipment manufacturing, or biotech medical and food production. Being one of the largest life science organizations gives the company an edge over its competitors. Recently, one of the companies showed some intentions to buy the company, and the owners are also willing to sell the organization to the potential buyer. Still, the management has noticed that the potential buyer might pull out of the offer. So, I need to look into more companies, specifically life science organizations, for potential buyers. The contingency plan demands looking into the financials of the potential buyers and identifying a suitable buyer. 

Alternative Buyers

There are many alternative buyers, and some of them are Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Alkermes, Gilead Sciences Inc, Jazz pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson, Novartis, Nova Nordisk, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, and Vertex Pharmaceuticals. These companies have solid financials, all of these companies are Multinationals, and these companies have enough resources to buy the organization. Out of these companies, I have chosen Johnson & Johnson as a potential buyer from the list of alternative buyers. (Mazzucato et al., 2020)

Johnson & Johnson is one of the oldest pharmaceutical corporations globally and is around 130 years old. The company produces a wide range of pharmaceutical products. Johnson & Johnson is a multinational organization that sells its pharmaceutical products in over a hundred countries. 

Current Market

Johnson & Johnson mainly focus on Immunology, Cardiovascular and metabolic disease but also produces and sells products related to Infectious disease and vaccines. Most recently, during the pandemic, they also made one of the covid vaccines, which were quite effective against the virus. The company manufactures products related to children’s diseases and viruses related to infants and children. One of the best-selling products of Johnson & Johnson is products related to Infants and children, like baby lotion and powder. As the company is multinational, it has a different product focus in other world regions. For example, in third world countries, the company is most famous for infants and children’s products and vaccines for infants and children. In developed countries like Europe, vaccines, and products related to infectious diseases are more popular as people rely on the quality of the product. Cardiovascular products are famous around the globe, and doctors and patients prefer these products the company. So, the company operates in a market of all medical or pharmaceutical-related fields. The company is leading the current market in some of the categories, like products related to kids and vaccines. Customers of almost all ages buy the company’s products, and around the globe, it is equally famous, and that’s why it’s the most prominent pharmaceutical organization. They have many competitors in every sector, and in almost every country, it manufactures or sells its products. The total market share of Johnson & Johnson is above 7%. And the closest competitor relative to market share stands at above 2.5 percent, and this information is enough to prove that Johnson & Johnson is the leading pharmaceutical company in the world. (Milanesa et al., 2020)

Financial Situation

As we have discussed earlier, the company is the largest pharmaceutical company. The financial position of the company is also solid and stable because of this pandemic which accelerated the health issue crisis, which as a result, increased the demand for pharmaceutical products, has a very positive impact on the company’s financial position. The company’s revenue has increased by almost 17 percent in the past two years. Revenue of the company right now is $93,775,000,000, compared to where they stood in 2018 at $81,581,000,000; there is a good increase in revenue. When the revenue increases, the cost of sales also increases. The current price of sales of the company is $29,855,000,000, an increase of around 15 percent if we compare it with the numbers of 2018. The company’s operating expenses have seen a sharp increase in 2021 compared to 2020 and 2019, but other income has also seen a sharp decrease recently. The current net income of the company stands at $20,878,000,000, which is up from $14,714,000,000, which is an excellent jump in profits. EPS for the last year was 5.59, and it is expected that the EPS will be above 8 dollars per share this year. The company’s balance sheet is also solid, with low debt and high equity. (Livingstone et al., 2021)

Recent Developments

Johnson & Johnson has appointed Jaoquin Donato as its new CEO. Joaquin has 33 years of experience in the company, has worked in all the sectors, and has in many different countries. The new CEO brings vast experience and has worked his way to the top. Recently, the company has won the award of leading Innovation Company globally, and Times magazine also named the covid vaccine of Johnson & Johnson as the world’s best invention of 2021. which gives the company massive credibility in the fight against the virus has been very effectively won with the help of vaccines. The most important factor which affected the whole world was the pandemic. Since the pandemic hit the world, almost all big pharmaceutical companies have started research on developing an effective vaccine to beat the virus. After some time, nearly all of the big pharmaceutical companies have invented a vaccine, and Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine is one of the most effective vaccines. 

All the events that happened recently will not affect the idea of a potential buyer. As the company is currently so occupied with fighting the pandemic and working on innovation, the new CEO can pose an excellent opportunity to convince him to buy the business. 

Buyer Rationale

Johnson & Johnson is the best option for the life science organization as the company is already working with a very successful business model. Instead of expanding into a new segment of the sector, the company can buy an already successful business and make the company more robust and financially reliable for the investors. The company’s goodwill will also play a huge role in acquiring the business. The company has been making good profits and has enough cash to buy an already successful business, so the company is the best option for the life science organization. 

Acquisition Road Map

To acquire a company, the organizations on both sides need to work on a plan to make the transaction successful. The plan needs to be clear, and all the details should be in the plan about how this acquisition process will work. (Lei et al., 2018)

Acquisition Related Tasks

The First step must be about preparing all the acquisition demands and taking all the stakeholders on board for the upcoming acquisition process. Taking the whole management on board and preparing for the acquisition process by teaming up with the relevant people will take around 2 to 3 months. The second step must be preparing for the negotiations related to the sale of the business. The organization should collect all the numbers associated with its finances and the potential price for the whole company. The seller will be looking to buy a good business with sound finances at a lower price, but a buyer will be looking for a good and reasonable price. In this step, the negotiations on the acquisition price will be discussed between the top management of both organizations. This process can take up to 1 month. The third step should be the acquisition price, and the price should be accurately related to the company’s financial position. All the numbers posted in the sale document should be without any error because any error will turn the deal out of the table, and the management should be looking to close the information gap. Price negotiations will depend on the financial health of the company and the potential of the business model the company in the future. Executives from both sides should look into the numbers carefully and draft the agreement carefully with all due diligence. This process can take up to 1 month. The Fourth step must look into closing the deal. The CEOs of both organizations should be looking to sign the acquisition papers and complete the transaction carefully with all the funds deposited in the respective accounts. 

References

Mazzucato, M., Li, H. L., & Darzi, A. (2020). Is it time to nationalise the pharmaceutical industry?. BMJ368.

Milanesi, M., Runfola, A., & Guercini, S. (2020). Pharmaceutical industry riding the wave of sustainability: Review and opportunities for future research. Journal of cleaner production261, 121204.

Livingston, E. H., Malani, P. N., & Creech, C. B. (2021). The Johnson & Johnson Vaccine for COVID-19. Jama325(15), 1575-1575.

Lei, Y., Li, N., Guo, L., Li, N., Yan, T., & Lin, J. (2018). Machinery health prognostics: A systematic review from data acquisition to RUL prediction. Mechanical systems and signal processing104, 799-834.

Acquisition Plan

PLAN START Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 1 1 1 1 PLAN DURATION Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 2 3 4 5 ACTUAL START Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 3 4 5 6 ACTUAL DURATION Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 4 5 6 7 PERCENT COMPLETE Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 0.25 0.5 0.75 1

Operations Management homework help


Discussion Question # 1: What are your key takeaways from the book Buy-In?
(use the Book: Buy-In: Saving Your Good Idea from Getting Shot Down attachment to answer this question)

Top of Form


Discussion Question # 2: Why is it important to consider buy-in within the context of organization strategic management?

(use the Book: Buy-In: Saving Your Good Idea from Getting Shot Down attachment to answer this question)

Operations Management homework help

Research Proposal Assignment

See Text Pages 64-68

HOW see Page 12-14 for correct formatting of report and presentation of costs/

Research proposals are “sophisticated advertisements of approaches and abilities and not just a description of how a project should be tackled.” (White, 1997)

It has been my experience that many research proposals are requested solely to abide organizational bylaws. These bylaws require sponsoring organizations to review at least three proposals from competing firms for each project/contract. Requesting several proposals is intended to ensure that costs are represented accurately by initiating a competitive mindset in regard to those who submit their proposals.

In far too many cases, the firm to be awarded the contract has already been selected and the sponsoring organization is merely following “going through the motions.” As you no doubt realize it is vastly unfair to firms that prepare and submit RFPs in good faith as the preparation of an RFP is time consuming and expensive.

I have yet to find a way to identify valid RFPs from those do not represent true opportunities. I have however noticed requests for proposals that result in contracts frequently being awarded to the same firms usually do not represent fair play. I have also learned that organizations that conduct themselves in this fashion rapidly gain a reputation for submitting RFPs that are void of opportunity.

Deciding to prepare an RFP can be a difficult decision as gaining new business is necessary for survival in the business world. Yet, wasting time when there is no opportunity to be had can devastate a firm. Since you are providing a service to a potential client do not hesitate to call the firm and inquire about the opportunity and the decision factors for winning the contract. In so doing you may also learn valuable information not contained in the RFP.

The research proposal aspect of our research journey is extremely important. The request for proposal lends itself to contract development and serves to project the researcher and the client organization. Humans are curious by nature and as you present your findings to your client, more often than not they will have additional questions or will request additional research findings. Often, the research provided will not provide the information requested and, in these cases, researchers are protected by the research proposal and signed contract. The same is true for the client organization.

A thorough research proposal is instrumental is managing expectations in addition to maintaining professional relationships and ensuring the researcher gets paid.

Steps to Completing Research Proposal:

Typically the research proposal is undertaken and signed off prior to beginning the project. We are going to work backwards om the preparation of our proposals

1) Research proposals are to present our corporate identity (logo)

2) Provide a brief description of the research project.

3) Develop a plan of action. Summarize your literature search and discuss how the results of this research assisted your preparation of the question and answer sessions. Be brief but specific in regard to your literature search results. In short, provide reasoning as to why you elected design the project in the way you did. Provide line citations and your bibliography from the literature search you submitted.

4) Prepare a short description of the steps we took to develop and initiate the project. If you had to do this again what steps would you take?

5) What manpower would you need?

6) Develop a timeline

7) Provide project costs and do not for the markup and estimated hours.

***Be Sure to Provide Appendix with questionnaire and bibliography.

Charge 150.00 per hour for your time. Consider the following: Determine or estimate the time for each of the following:

-Initial meeting client probably should not be charged for this meeting

-Literature search time

-Three question and answer sessions and question preparation time

-Questionnaire development and revision 250.00 per question plus your time

-Questionnaire conversion to Survey Monkey

-Questionnaire send out to sample frame.

-Analyze results

-Write report

-Present Report

-Other items??

Mail list 860.00 needs markup 860/(1-.40)

Survey Monkey $1159.00 markup up same as above

pg. 2

Operations Management homework help

Beyond Telehealth: How To Create a
Seamless Virtual Healthcare Experience

Supporting a virtual healthcare ecosystem can regularly
engage patients, mitigate risks, and deliver better overall
outcomes.

Jason Martial

SR. PRODUCT MARKETING MANAGER, HEALTHCARE AND LIFE SCIENCES

NOV 06, 20204 MIN READ

The first quarter of 2020 was the most funded quarter for digital health technology in
history. Healthcare organizations spent a staggering $9.1 billion in the first half of the year
to accelerate innovation as they responded to COVID-19.

The pandemic proved just how vital a connected, virtual healthcare ecosystem is to
patients and organizations. And, there are countless examples of healthcare organizations
that rapidly deployed virtual care solutions: a small hospital in Toronto built a COVID-19
self-assessment in record time, a senior service company launched a hospital-at-home
option for vulnerable seniors, and a community health system deployed a call center triage
to handle a record number of inquiries to name a few.

A successful virtual care ecosystem amounts to more than the sum of its parts. Many pieces
must work together to inform, personalize, and accelerate the ability to care for another.
This may include application portals, online scheduling, remote monitoring, pharmacy
delivery, chatbots, and many more digital engagement tools.

To create a virtual care ecosystem, there are three main levers for opportunity:

• Increasing reach and improving access to care
• Keeping people healthy and reducing the disease burden
• Decreasing costs by boosting the efficiency of care

Here’s how to pull these levers to drive better engagement and boost adherence, which
ultimately leads to better outcomes.

Lay the foundation

COVID-19 increased consumers’ expectations in their healthcare. A recent study from
Accenture found that based on their experience during the pandemic, 60% of patients want
to continue to use technology to communicate with providers and manage future
conditions. People realize that virtual care is not only convenient — saving time and
offering immediate remedies, such as the best course of treatment for a sprained ankle —
but a necessity as they choose to stay away from medical facilities due to concerns over the
virus.

Driven by an agile, scalable, and secure digital platform, a virtual care ecosystem allows
healthcare organizations to easily follow a patient’s health journey and engage with
patients remotely in a quick, easy, and nimble fashion. This high-touch engagement
strategy will complement and enhance the patient experience while improving health
outcomes with expanded access to care, increased touchpoints, and better care plan
adherence.

Start with an engagement platform that consolidates patient data, like Health Cloud. This
allows you to connect disparate systems, like electronic medical records (EMR) and front-
office systems with contact details and communication preferences, with a single platform.
An application programming interface (API)-driven approach enables you to see all patient
data — clinical, consumer, behavioral — in one place. (See it in action.)

Engage patients

Whether it’s a pre- or post-acute incident, it is imperative to engage patients outside the
walls of your healthcare facility. People want to feel like their providers know who they are
and care about how they’re doing. But according to Salesforce’s Connected Healthcare
Consumer Report, only 40% of consumers say the communications they receive feel
relevant to them.

There are a variety of digital engagement tools you can use to begin:

• Digital patient communities promote a self-service mentality, which reduces
unnecessary calls to the health system and empowers patients to take a more
proactive role in their health. Patients stay up-to-date on their health system and
program options, and easily engage for their own healthcare needs.

• Chatbots make it possible for patients to connect with their providers anytime.
When they reach out, the chatbot confirms identifying information. The patient can
select from a menu of available options with common requests, such as operating
hours, contact info, and walk-in clinic locations. If a patient wants to talk through
symptoms or concerns over COVID-19, the chatbot can transfer the patient to a
medical professional on standby. This interaction can even turn into a digital house
call when you integrate video conferencing capabilities into your solution.

• Personalized content and promotions put patients on a tailored journey that
makes them feel truly seen and understood. Proactive communications may include
visit confirmations, automated follow-ups, and content of interest based on their
condition.

Boost adherence

Forty percent of patients sustain significant risks due to misunderstanding, forgetting, or
even ignoring healthcare advice. When healthcare organizations provide ongoing outreach,
patients form a better understanding of how and when to take medications, what kinds of
activities might be helpful or harmful, and how they can adapt their diet to better support
their health.

To boost adherence, consider the following:

• Instructional content on the therapeutic program, easily available through your
patient community or app

• Automated medication and testing reminders, sent via an app, email, or push
notification on their mobile device

• Goal tracking, daily adherence logs, and task lists on their patient community

Improve outcomes

Patient engagement and ongoing education are perhaps the most vital part of virtual
healthcare. Patients that are more invested in their own health tend to have better
outcomes.

Having a virtual care ecosystem in place that regularly engages patients can mitigate risks
and deliver better overall outcomes. Learn more about how you can build your virtual care
ecosystem by watching our webinar How Providers Can Accelerate Virtual Health With the
Right Technology.

Operations Management homework help


Week 1 Discussion
$6.00

Discussion Topic

 Top of Form

Due April 29 at 12:59 AM

Bottom of Form

Discussion

Before beginning work on this week’s discussion forum, please review the link “
Doing Discussion Questions Right
,” the expanded grading rubric for the forum, and any specific instructions for this week’s topic. 

By the due date assigned respond to the assigned discussion questions and submit your responses to the appropriate topic in this Discussion Area

· Respond to the assigned questions using the lessons and vocabulary found in the reading.

· Support your answers with examples and research and cite your research using the APA format.

· Start reviewing and responding to the postings of your classmates as early in the week as possible. 

Advertising and Promotion

Assume you work in marketing for a firm in one of the following scenarios:

1. An upscale clothing line which is geared for children ages newborn to 12 years of age

2. A non-profit organization which helps women who have been victims of domestic violence

3. A firm which markets outdoor equipment for activities such as camping, fishing, hunting, etc.

4. Pick a firm of your choice and include the link to the web site or provide description of the brand. 

Create a 300-400-word response discussing the following questions:

· Identify six promotional methods you will use to reach the target market for your selected scenario. Provide your justification in terms of why this method is appropriate for your target audience.

· How should your firm utilize social media to position your brand?

· Pick two firms which compete in the product category you selected. What promotional methods do they use to market their brand?  Do you agree with their approach? Why or why not? 

Be sure to properly cite your sources using APA; include your references and in-text citations. Comment on the postings of your classmates. Do you agree with their position? Why or why not?

Cite any sources you use in APA format.


Week 1 Project
$15.00

Assignment

Top of Form

Due May 3 at 12:59 AM

Bottom of Form

Targeting and Positioning

This course has major project assignments due in Week 3 and Week 5. It will take more than a week’s effort to adequately complete them. Plan time to start the research and work on those assignments earlier than the week in which they are due. 

Consider a product which you have recently purchased and answer the following questions:

· Assess how advertising influenced your recent purchase. How did it make you aware of the product? (include the advertisement or link to the brand’s web site)

· Based on your knowledge of the brand, who is the target market? In your analysis, consider the four sets of consumer characteristics which influence what people consume and how they respond to marketing communications.

· Evaluate how the brand is positioned in the marketplace. What benefits and attributes are associated with the brand?

· How can three different brands be positioned relative to each other in a target market? For example, as a part of the fast-food industry, compare McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King. What variables do you feel are the most important for positioning and differentiating these fast-food restaurants in the market? Why do you feel these variables are so important? 

Submission Details:

· Submit your plan in a 3- to 4-page Microsoft Word document, using APA style.


Week 2 Discussion
$6.00

Discussion Topic

Top of Form

Due May 6 at 12:59 AM

Bottom of Form

Discussion

By the due date assigned, respond to the assigned discussion questions and submit your responses to the appropriate topic in this Discussion Area.

· Respond to the assigned questions using the lessons and vocabulary found in the reading.

· Support your answers with examples and research and cite your research using the APA format.

· Start reviewing and responding to the postings of your classmates as early in the week as possible 

AIDA Model

AIDA is the most common model used for designing advertisements. Select a full-page advertisement from a recent national magazine edition and analyze the design using the AIDA model. Include a scanned copy of the advertisement or a link to the advertising campaign for discussion purposes. 

Create a 300-400-word response discussing the following questions:

· Which elements of the advertisement work well? What could you do differently? How do the different elements relate to each other?

· Provide an example of how marketers are integrating social media tools such as Twitter, blogs, and Facebook into an advertisement. Discuss how successful these efforts have been. What could be the learning for marketers from these efforts in applying social media to marcom? 

Be sure to properly cite your sources using APA; include your references and in-text citations. 

Comment on the postings of your classmates. Do you agree with their position? Why or why not?


Week 2 Project
$15.00

Assignment

 Top of Form

Due May 10 at 12:59 AM

Bottom of Form

Measuring Advertising Message Effectiveness

Measuring the effectiveness of advertising campaigns has always been a challenge. Conduct online research to find five Super Bowl advertisements to analyze and answer the following questions (include links to the advertisements):

· Summarize the television advertisements selected and analyze the target audience and the objective(s) of the advertisements.

· Based on your research and assigned weekly readings, propose methods a marketer can use to evaluate the effectiveness of the advertising message for the advertisements you selected.

· What are the advantages and disadvantages of the various methods?

· What are the situations or circumstances where a method would be most effective? 

Be sure to conclude your paper with a summary of the key points of learning from your work. 

Include a minimum of three peer reviewed articles for your paper. 

Submission Details:

· Submit your analysis in a 4- to 5-page Microsoft Word document.

Week 3 Discussion $6.00

Discussion Topic 

Top of Form

Due May 13 at 12:59 AM

Discussion

Before beginning work on this week’s discussion forum, please review the link “Doing Discussion Questions Right,” the expanded grading rubric for the forum, and any specific instructions for this week’s topic. 

By the due date assigned, respond to the assigned discussion questions and submit your responses to the appropriate topic in this Discussion Area. 

· Respond to the assigned questions using the lessons and vocabulary found in the reading.

· Support your answers with examples and research and cite your research using the APA format.

· Start reviewing and responding to the postings of your classmates as early in the week as possible. 

Online Advertising

Traditional advertising such as print and television has decreased, while online or Internet advertising has continued to increase. This week you have learned that online advertising can take place in many different formats. 

Create a 300 – 400-word response discussing the following questions:

· Pick three types of online advertising formats and describe each in detail. Include an example for each. (Select from: blogs, podcasts, social networks, e-zines, email, video advertisements, banner advertisements, and pop-ups)

· You know from your reading that search engine advertising is one of the fastest forms of online advertising. Assume that you sell cowboy boots and want to advertise your retail firm through Google. Describe how search engine advertising works. What are some major concerns with search engine advertising?

· What is behavioral marketing and why may a marketer be interested in this approach? 

Be sure to properly cite your sources using APA; include your references and in-text citations. 

Comment on the postings of your classmates. Do you agree with their position? Why or why not?

Week 3 Project $35.00

Assignment

Top of Form

Due May 17 at 12:59 AM

Bottom of Form

Course Project Part 1

This course has major project assignments due in Week 3 and Week 5. It will take more than a week’s effort to adequately complete them. Plan time to start the research and work on those assignments earlier than the week in which they are due. 

Based on research conducted on the South University online library or via the Internet, identify a brand which is struggling in the marketplace. In this project, you will assume the role of the brand manager who has been hired reposition the brand in the marketplace and increase sales through an integrated marketing communications (IMC) plan. 

Complete the following activities:                                               

· Summarize the brand you selected. Why is the brand struggling and how will you revitalize the brand?

· Conduct a market segmentation analysis. Who is your target market and why? Be sure to consider the four sets of consumer characteristics which influence what people consume and how they respond to marketing communications.

· Determine how your brand is positioned in the marketplace. Who are your competitors? What benefits and attributes are associated with the brand?

· Determine the objective of your advertising campaign and provide justification.

· Create your marcom budget. Determine if you will utilize the percentage of sales method, the task method, or the competitive method.

· Create the advertising message for your campaign. How will you create effective advertising and get the message to stick in the minds of your target audience? What message strategy will you use?

· Propose how you will measure the effectiveness of your advertising message. 

Submission Details:

· Submit your answers in a 6- to 9-page Microsoft Word document, using APA style.

Week 4 Discussion $6.00

Discussion Topic

Due May 20 at 12:59 AM

Discussion

Before beginning work on this week’s discussion forum, please review the link “Doing Discussion Questions Right,” the expanded grading rubric for the forum, and any specific instructions for this week’s topic. 

By the due date assigned respond to the assigned discussion questions and submit your responses to the appropriate topic in this Discussion Area. 

· Respond to the assigned questions using the lessons and vocabulary found in the reading.

· Support your answers with examples and research and cite your research using the APA format.

· Start reviewing and responding to the postings of your classmates as early in the week as possible. 

Consumer Sales Promotion

We know from our lecture that the function of consumer sales promotions is to increase the sales of the firm’s products. This is accomplished by increasing the product’s exposure to the public. The desirability of the product to consumers is also increased by sales promotions, with the goal being an increase in demand for the product. 

Conduct research and find examples of each of the following consumer sales promotions and answer the following questions in 300-400-word response:

· Coupons are a common tool of integrated marketing communication (IMC). How have coupons influenced your purchase of a product or service? What are the features of the coupon that were most influential in your purchase decision?

· Many firms use contests or sweepstakes to promote their product. How does a contest or a sweepstake impact or influence your decision to purchase? Did you win any of the prizes as a result? Did this influence your view of the product? Why or why not?

· Samples are often given out at supermarkets or can be sent through the mail. Has tasting a sample resulted in your buying the product? If so, did you become brand loyal to the product? If not, why not? What is your opinion on the sample’s effectiveness as a promotional tool? 

Be sure to properly cite your sources using APA; include your references and in-text citations. 

Comment on the postings of your classmates. Do you agree with their position? Why or why not?

Week 4 Project $15.00

Assignment 

Top of Form

Due May 24 at 12:59 AM

Project: Trade Allowances

This course has a major project assignment due in Week 5. It will take more than a week’s effort to adequately complete it. Plan time to start the research and work on the assignment earlier than the week in which it is due. 

Trade Allowances

Trade allowances are a common promotional practice. The most common are slotting allowances at supermarkets. Slotting allowances are fees that supermarkets charge brands to place their products on the supermarket’s shelves. Discuss and evaluate the practice of slotting at supermarkets.

· What are the criticisms of the practice of slotting at supermarkets?

· What are the advantages of the practice of slotting?

· Assess some efforts that some retailers, including P&G, have taken to rectify trade allowance problems. Have they been successful?

· Evaluate the pros and cons of pay-for-performance programs. 

Submission Details:

· Submit your answers in a 3- to 4-page Microsoft Word document, using APA style.

Week 5 Discussion $6.00

Discussion Topic

Top of Form

Due May 27 at 12:59 AM

Discussion

Before beginning work on this week’s discussion forum, please review the link “Doing Discussion Questions Right,” the expanded grading rubric for the forum, and any specific instructions for this week’s topic. 

By the due date assigned, respond to the assigned discussion questions and submit your responses to the appropriate topic in this Discussion Area. 

· Respond to the assigned questions using the lessons and vocabulary found in the reading.

· Support your answers with examples and research and cite your research using the APA format.

· Start reviewing and responding to the postings of your classmates as early in the week as possible. 

Ethics Advertising

Advertising is a key element of IMC, but also, it is the element most likely to create ethical issues. Create a 300-400-word response answering the following:

· Describe a recent advertisement you have seen that you considered to be unethical. What were the elements that made it unethical? Was it also illegal? Why? Discuss the difference between an illegal and an unethical advertisement. Also, discuss why a company should avoid running an unethical advertisement even if it is legal.

· The fast-food industry invests heavily in the promotion of its products aimed at children. Select one of the major fast-food chains and describe how they market to children. Is it ethical to target kids using toys to promote fast food? Why or why not? 

Be sure to properly cite your sources using APA; include your references and in-text citations. 

Comment on the postings of your classmates. Do you agree with their position? Why or why not?

Week 5 Project $40.00

Assignment 

Top of Form

Due May 31 at 12:59 AM

Course Project Part 2

This course has a major project assignment due in Week 5. It will take more than a week’s effort to adequately complete it. Plan time to start the research and work on the assignment earlier than the week in which it is due. 

This week, you will finalize your integrated marketing communications plan for your selected brand. Incorporate your instructor’s feedback from Week 3 into this final submission. 

Complete the following activities:

· Summarize your integrated marketing communication plan for your selected brand.

· Prepare a proposal which includes your advertising media plan. Include both traditional and non-traditional forms of advertising, including online. Be sure to include your social media strategy in your proposal.

· Evaluated how the media selected is matched to the media habits of the target market.

· Explain how consumer promotions should be integrated into your integrated marketing communications strategy.

· Many brands use cause marketing to promote interest in their products. Analyze how your brand can utilize cause marketing to promote brand loyalty.

· Develop a public relations plan for your brand. Discuss the key elements of the public relations strategy and provide justification. 

Submission Details:

· Submit your case study analysis in a 7- to 10-page Microsoft Word document, using APA style.

Operations Management homework help

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Date and Time: Thursday, April 14, 2022 2:41:00 PM PDT

Job Number: 169021617

Documents (2)

1. When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

Client/Matter: -None-

Search Terms: Service referral software for case workers in IPV and Interacting with case workers

Search Type: Natural Language

Narrowed by:

Content Type Narrowed by
News -None-

2. Bibliography

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain
Recommended Services?

Journal of Interpersonal Violence

November 2021

Copyright 2021 Sage Publications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Section: Pg. NaN-NaN; Vol.36; No.21-22; ISSN: 0886-2605, 1552-6518

Length: 5217 words

Body

ABSTRACT

This study looked at 991 women surviving intimate partner violence (IPV), exploring several factors in their receipt
of IPV services through the child welfare system. A secondary data analysis, the research used longitudinal data
from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II, was conducted to evaluate the relationship
between receiving IPV services and child welfare intervention and between such receipt and demographic
characteristics. Women in the sample had been substantiated for maltreatment and had lifetime experience of IPV;
15% of these women had received IPV services. Generalized estimation equation results showed likelihood of
receiving services increased when the case plan specified needed IPV services. Biological/adoptive mothers
retaining custody of children were relatively unlikely to receive IPV services, as were lower income women. Receipt
of services was relatively unlikely at the third-wave interview compared with the first-wave interview, but no
difference in likelihood of receiving services was found between first- and second-wave interviews. In addition,
likelihood of receiving services was not associated here with the number of recent IPV episodes, IPV maltreatment,
mother’s perceived engagement with caseworker, and mother’s race/ethnicity, employment, and education. Some
implications for practice are discussed.

FULL TEXT

Intimate Partner Violence and Child Welfare

In 2015, U.S. Department of Justice reported over 800,000 intimate partner violence (IPV) incidents nationally,
involving over 300,000 victims of sexual assault, physical assault, and stalking by partner (Truman & Morgan,

Page 2 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

2016). The present study focused on IPV, designated “intimate terrorism,” committed against nonviolent women by
violent males with whom they are engaged in a dysfunctional relationship (M. P. Johnson, 1995, 2006, 2011). The
children of woman victims of IPV may also experience abuse from the violent male partner; in some cases, the
woman victims themselves assault children, trying to curb misbehavior likely to anger the IPV perpetrator (Jouriles
et al., 2008). Studies with perpetrators and victims (no specified gender) have found IPV and child maltreatment to
co-occur at rates of roughly 40% (Coulter & Mercado-Crespo, 2015; Hazen et al., 2004; Herrenkohl et al., 2008).
Studies with male perpetrators and female survivors, however, report co-occurrence at rates as high as 89%
(Jouriles et al., 2008).

Many studies are consistent in showing that experiencing IPV influences mothers’ parenting behaviors negatively
(Chiesa et al., 2018; Grasso et al., 2016; Gustafsson et al., 2012; Murray et al., 2012; Ogbonnaya et al., 2019;
Postmus et al., 2012). Unsurprisingly, according to published results, current and active IPV—although not past
IPV—demonstrate negative associations with maternal parenting. Victims of current and active IPV have engaged
in child neglect, psychological aggression, and physical violence (Casanueva et al., 2008; Chang et al., 2008).
Some research shows recent and continuing severe IPV to elevate likelihood of child maltreatment or its
reoccurrence (Casanueva et al., 2009; Kohl & Macy, 2008; Taylor et al., 2009). However, one study reports that
fewer risk factors in child maltreatment typify IPV cases versus neglect cases (Trocme et al., 2013). Moreover,
some studies have observed no link between experiencing IPV and maternal parenting (Ateah et al., 2019; Sullivan
et al., 2000) or have found IPV experience to be associated with positive maternal parenting (Greeson et al., 2014;
Lapierre, 2010; Nixon et al., 2017). In fact, the existence of so-called failure-to-protect laws and their enforcement
by child welfare agencies is a form of blaming victims for IPV that overlooks IPV perpetrators’ culpability (Alaggia et
al., 2007; Douglas & Walsh, 2010; Edleson et al., 2006; Ewen, 2007; Jaffe et al., 2003).

A national study of child welfare cases found that half of mothers actively experiencing IPV were receiving services
from women’s shelters and IPV programs that helped victims to deal with abusive partners. The risk that
perpetrators may retaliate against them may deter some women experiencing IPV from attempting to get help. To
promote help seeking by these women, service providers need to educate the women about a potential adverse
impact on children exposed to IPV (Randell et al., 2012). However, the proportion may be a result, mainly, of
inaccurate identification of IPV (Kohl et al., 2005). In addition to child welfare workers’ insufficient training on IPV,
some counseling services focused on ending abusive relationships that further disempower woman victims (Friend
et al., 2008; Jaffe et al., 2003 S. P. Johnson & Sullivan, 2008). There are effective interventions, however.
Examples include group-based programs that aim to empower and support women coping with a variety of
challenges (Grip et al., 2011) or that educate women on how violence affects individual family members and family
life (Peled et al., 2010). In addition, interventions focusing on safety plans and parent–child communication can be
effective (Grip et al., 2012). The present study was an exploration of factors in woman victims’ receipt of IPV
services within the child welfare system.

Child Welfare Intervention

Page 3 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

Intervention by child welfare caseworkers facilitates woman victims’ receipt of IPV services. These services include
counseling/therapy, crisis/outreach intervention, and parenting intervention, all addressing mothers’ mental health
and parenting skills (Graham-Bermann & Miller-Graff, 2015; Rizo et al., 2011). The literature suggests that when
caseworkers identify client need for IPV services, clients are relatively likely to obtain them through the child welfare
system. One indicator establishing the need for IPV services is women’s experience of IPV. Within the child welfare
system, anywhere from 12.0% to 56.8% of mothers are experiencing active IPV, while anywhere from 29.0% to
36.4% have lifetime IPV experience (Casanueva et al., 2014; Kohl et al., 2005; Millett et al., 2015). Studies show
that, among women in the system, anywhere from 20% to 83% receive IPV services they need (Kohl et al., 2005; B.
D. Smith & Marsh, 2002). Higher likelihood of service receipt among women IPV survivors appears to be associated
with recent IPV experience (Finno-Velasquez & Ogbonnaya, 2017). Yet, caseworkers may not be well prepared to
identify the need for IPV services. One study, for example, reported 70% of child welfare caseworkers to have IPV
training assuring their confidence in their ability to address IPV experienced by clients (Coulter & Mercado-Crespo,
2015). Another, however, found that one-third to one-half (32%–49%) of foster care caseworkers lacked any IPV-
related training at all (Renner, 2011a).

Another indicator establishing the need for IPV services is substantiation of IPV during a woman’s child
maltreatment investigation. Even when IPV is ongoing, however, the investigation process that often
substantiates/indicates child abuse/neglect may not be aware of IPV (K. C. Smith et al., 2005). Thus, many women
surviving IPV are not deemed by a child welfare authority to need IPV services and do not receive them.

Researchers have reported that just 27% to 57% of caseworkers successfully identified reports of IPV coming from
children’s caregivers (Casanueva et al., 2014; Kohl et al., 2005). Even when IPV is identified, caseworkers then
must follow through by entering IPV services in the caregiver’s case plan. Because IPV and other services can be
mandated in light of substantiation/indication of child maltreatment, caseworkers’ role in women’s receipt of IPV
services is clearly crucial (Casanueva et al., 2008; Reich, 2005).

While caseworkers should prepare case plans separately for both mother and IPV perpetrator (Malik et al., 2008),
male IPV perpetrators often are uninvolved in case planning (Alaggia et al., 2007; Douglas & Walsh, 2010; Edleson
et al., 2006; Ewen, 2007; Jaffe et al., 2003). Identifying the need for IPV services requires collaborative
engagement of caseworker with caregiver. Such caregiver–caseworker engagement is built on positive, responsive
interactions between professionals and caregivers as efforts proceed to identify needs (Jolles & Wells, 2017; Lietz,
2011) and ensure receipt of needed services along with caregivers’ progress (Cheng & Lo, 2016). Two studies
suggest, however, that collaborative engagement of caseworkers with women surviving IPV is not typical (Lietz,
2011; Staudt et al., 2001).

Caseworker interventions that can affect IPV service receipt also include placement decisions following
substantiation. In one study, women surviving IPV who kept custody of children following substantiation received
IPV services at a rate of roughly 50% (Kohl et al., 2005). Women surviving IPV who saw their children enter foster
care or other placement were comparatively less likely to obtain IPV services, their caseworkers often overlooking
the requisite referrals (Renner, 2011b).

Page 4 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

Demographic Characteristics

At least four demographic characteristics of woman IPV victims—racial/ethnic background, income, employment,
and education—may relate to their receipt of IPV services within the child welfare system. Where racial/ethnic
background’s role in receipt of IPV services is concerned, research results appear mixed. One study found no
significant association between race/ethnicity and receipt of IPV services by women surviving IPV (Kohl et al.,
2005). Another, of African American women specifically, did observe several racial/ethnic barriers to IPV service
receipt: inaccessibility of the services, culturally derived perceptions of IPV, and mistrust of service providers (Bent-
Goodley, 2004).

Adequate family income in general helps enable individuals to receive health or mental health services. For
instance, adequate income among women surviving IPV probably helps them secure affordable services
addressing IPV-related problems. Nevertheless, one study of Latina mothers in the child welfare system showed no
significant link between family income and mothers’ IPV service receipt (Finno-Velasquez & Ogbonnaya, 2017). A
plausible explanation of this finding is that low-income women received support from state child welfare agencies
and Medicaid that enabled some, at least, to obtain IPV services; another explanation is that IPV services are often
free to woman IPV victims.

Regarding the impact on help seeking made by employment status and education, prior results again are mixed.
One study of help seeking in general—not seeking of help for IPV specifically—reported employment to
demonstrate negative association with help seeking among woman IPV victims (Cheng & Lo, 2014); another,
however, found no such association (Cheng & Lo, 2015). One prior study of woman IPV victims’ help seeking
showed it to be associated positively with educational level (Cheng & Lo, 2015), while another, of woman IPV
victims involved in child welfare, found no significant link between education and receipt of IPV services (Finno-
Velasquez & Ogbonnaya, 2017).

Literature on how child welfare intervention may relate to the receipt of IPV services by mothers experiencing abuse
appears scant. To examine child welfare intervention factors in IPV service receipt, the present study hypothesized
that the receipt of services by women surviving IPV would be associated with the need for services, with
specification of service need(s) in case plan, with level of caseworker–caregiver engagement, with type of child
placement, and with race/ethnicity, family income, employment status, and education of IPV victim.

Method

Sample

The present sample was extracted from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II (NSCAW-II)
public-use data set. NSCAW-II contained information collected from a nationally representative sample of 5,872
children who were involved in child protective services (CPS) between 2008 and 2012 (National Data Archive on
Child Abuse and Neglect, 2013). Each longitudinal record included a child’s and caregiver’s information from three
waves of interviews. Information on IPV experience and need for services was collected from caregivers and

Page 5 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

caseworkers. The present sample was confined to those longitudinal records showing a substantiated or indicated
instance of child maltreatment in the initial CPS investigation. Such records constituted 61.5% of NSCAW-II’s
original sample. The present study excluded records with unsubstantiated/non-indicated reports, because they
suggested either no maltreatment or evidence insufficient to confirm maltreatment. Any service need associated
with such records would, then, be unrelated to maltreatment. In addition, each record analyzed in the present study
described a female permanent caregiver (i.e., a biological or adoptive mother) with reported experience of IPV in
her lifetime. The present study’s final sample comprised 991 mothers meeting all selection criteria.

The three waves of NSCAW-II interviews were conducted at 6, 18, and 36 months after an initial CPS investigation.
Therefore, the present study employed the discrete-time method of longitudinal analysis (Allison, 1984; Finkel,
1995; Singer & Willett, 2003; Yamaguchi, 1991), dividing each longitudinal record into three person-waves (the
units of analysis). Each person-wave constituted one case in the data file; in all, 1,436 person-waves were
analyzed, the outcome and explanatory variables being measured for each. Values for some variables could vary
across interview waves: receipt of IPV services, placement type, and so on. Values for others, including
race/ethnicity, remained constant (see Table 1). The present study employed time indicators that controlled for
interview wave, allowing simultaneous comparison of results over time.

Table 1.

Characteristics of Outcome and Explanatory Variables.

Variables Type Collected in
ithInterview Wave

Time-Varying
orTime-Invariant

Values

Receipt of IPV services
Dichotomous First, second, third Time-varying 1/0

Number of IPV episodes
Continuous First, second, third Time-varying 0?300

IPV maltreatment
Dichotomous First Time-invariant 1/0

Case plan included IPV
services

Dichotomous First, second, third Time-varying 1/0

Placement at home Dichotomous First, second, third Time-varying 1/0

Mother?s perceived
caseworker engagement

Continuous First, second, third Time-varying ?28.0 to 10.1

(White) Dichotomous First Time-invariant 1/0

Latina Dichotomous First Time-invariant 1/0

African American Dichotomous First Time-invariant 1/0

Other ethnic minority Dichotomous First Time-invariant 1/0

Family income Continuous First, second, third Time-varying 1?4

Employed Dichotomous First, second, third Time-varying 1/0

Page 6 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

Variables Type Collected in
ithInterview Wave

Time-Varying
orTime-Invariant

Values

Educational level Continuous First, second, third Time-varying 1?5

(First interview wave) Dichotomous First Time-varying 1/0

Second interview wave Dichotomous Second Time-varying 1/0

Third interview wave Dichotomous Third Time-varying 1/0

Note. Reference groups are in parentheses. IPV = intimate partner violence.

Measures

The study’s dichotomous (yes/no) outcome variable, receipt of IPV services, noted whether a caseworker reported
mother’s receipt of IPV services such as domestic violence shelters and other programs designed to promote safety
and healing from IPV (National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect, 2013). The study also employed four
groups of explanatory variables. The first group—number of IPV episodes and IPV maltreatment—comprised
variables representing a mother’s need for IPV services. Number of IPV episodes gave the total number of violent
incidents a mother reported experiencing from her partner in the year preceding interview. In turn, IPV maltreatment
(yes/no) stated whether IPV was the most serious type of maltreatment substantiated or indicated in the initial
investigation, as reported by the caseworker.

The second explanatory variable group consisted of three measures representing caseworker interventions. Case
plan included IPV services dichotomously measured whether a caseworker had identified a need for IPV services
and specified such service in the case plan. Also, a dichotomous measure, placement at home, described
placement of children at home with the IPV-surviving mother, as reported by caseworker; its reference group
comprised kinship care and out-of-home care, such as foster care by non-relative or group home or residential
facility placement. (Types for child placements were developed by NSCAW-II researchers.) Mother’s perceived
caseworker engagement measured how satisfactorily, according to a mother, a caseworker had engaged her
collaboratively during the helping process. The present study measured this variable through six items asking
mothers whether caseworker maintained contact with them, listened to their concerns, showed respect for them,
explained problems well, invited them to meetings, and involved them in decision making. A three-point response
scale was used to measure how well a caseworker explained problems. For the remaining five items, a four-point
response scale measured the given engagement behaviors. In the present analysis, the engagement variable was
standardized through creation of a z-score for each item, with summing of these six scores to obtain a total score.
The higher the total score, the stronger the collaborative engagement reported by a mother. For the six items, a
Cronbach’s alpha of .89 was generated.

The third group of four explanatory variables represented the woman IPV victims’ demographic characteristics as
follows. A variable measured race/ethnicity as White (the reference group), Latina, African American, or other ethnic
minority. Another continuous variable, family income, was measured at four levels reflecting NSCAW-II data: 1
(below 50% of federal poverty level), 2 (50%–99% of federal poverty level), 3 (100%–200% of federal poverty level),

Page 7 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

and 4 (above 200% of federal poverty level). The variable educational level was described through five measures: 1
(no schooling), 2 (GED or high school diploma), 3 (vocational/technical training), 4 (associate’s/bachelor’s degree),
and 5 (graduate/professional degree). Finally, the dichotomous variable employed (yes/no) indicated whether a
respondent reported being employed in the 6 months preceding interview.

The fourth group of explanatory variables comprised two time indicators: second and third interview wave. Each
specified when a variable had been measured; the reference group was first interview wave. Time’s potential
association with the outcome was not the focus of this study; nevertheless, the discrete periods were treated as
variables, providing notable flexibility for the time function within longitudinal analysis (Singer & Willett, 2003).

Data Analysis

The outcome variable being dichotomous, this analysis used STATA generalized estimating equations (GEE), with
Binomial Family and Logit Link options, to estimate the autocorrelations among repeat measurements in the
longitudinal study (Hardin & Hilbe, 2003). Because some variables were time-invariant, the researchers used
autoregressive correlation. Moreover, GEE modeling addressed attrition, such as unequal lengths of longitudinal
records in the present sample (Hardin & Hilbe, 2003). Preliminary analysis of correlations (which ranged from –.44
to .26) and of tolerance statistics (.7 or higher) suggested no multicollinearity problems among the explanatory
variables. Barriers to IPV services—service unavailability, client difficulty in accessing service, and/or client refusal
of service—were noted only in a few person-waves. However, a barrier always led to nonreceipt of the service,
creating singularities during preliminary multivariate analysis. In an initial assessment of tolerance statistics, the
variable client’s referral for IPV services generated a multicollinearity problem, necessitating its exclusion from the
model.

Results

Of the 991 mothers providing the data, 31.0% were White, 32.3% were Latina, 29.6% were African American, and
7.2% were other ethnic minority. Caseworkers had substantiated IPV as the most serious maltreatment type for
only 10.0% of the 991. Only 15.0% of the 1,436 person-waves indicated that a mother had received an IPV
service(s) (see Table 2). On average across all person-waves, 11.3 IPV episodes occurring in the past year were
reported. In 17.3% of all person-waves, a case plan included IPV services, while in 95.2%, a mother’s child was
placed with her. On average across all person-waves, caseworker engagement received a score of –0.6. Across
person-waves, family income measures averaged 2.2 (50%–99% of federal poverty level) and educational level
averaged 2.1 (GED or high school diploma). In 18.4% of all person-waves, a mother reported being employed.

Table 2.

Descriptive Statistics of Time-Varying Outcome and Explanatory Variables (n = 1,436 Person-Waves).

Variables % M Range SD

Receipt of IPV services

Page 8 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

Variables % M Range SD

?Yes 15.
0

?No 85.
0

Number of IPV episodes
11.
3

0?300 30.3

Case plan included IPV services

?Yes 17.
3

?No 82.
7

Placement at home

?Yes 95.
2

?No 4.8

Mother?s perceived caseworker engagement
?0.
6

?28.0 to 10.1 6.7

Family income 2.2 1?4 1.0

Employed

?Yes 18.
4

?No 81.
6

Educational level 2.1 1?5 0.9

(First interview wave) 47.
4

Second interview wave 31.
3

Third interview wave 21.
4

Note. IPV = intimate partner violence.

Results of multivariate analysis confirmed the hypothesized model to differ significantly from the null model (Wald’s
χ2 = 198.02, p < .01; see Table 3). Likelihood of IPV service receipt significantly increased when a case plan
specified IPV services (OR = 101.38, p < .01). Such likelihood was significantly reduced, however, in association
with placement in home of biological/adoptive mother (OR = 0.20, p < .01). Negative associations were also found
between the outcome and both family income (OR = 0.43, p < .01) and third interview wave (OR = 0.32, p < .01).

Page 9 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

The present study showed no association between the outcome and the remaining variables (number of IPV
episodes, IPV maltreatment, caseworker engagement perceived by mother, race/ethnicity, education, employment).

Table 3.

Multivariate Analysis Results on Receipt of IPV Services (n = 1,436 Person-Waves).

Variables OR RSE

Number of IPV episodes
1.01 0.00

IPV maltreatment (no)
2.28 1.08

Case plan included IPV services (no)
101.38** 41.34

Placement at home (no) 0.20** 0.09

Mother?s perceived caseworker engagement
1.02 0.03

Latina (White) 0.65 0.36

African American (White) 0.77 0.32

Other ethnic minority (White) 1.78 0.95

Family income 0.43** 0.07

Employed (no) 2.09 0.85

Educational level 0.80 0.13

Second interview wave (first interview wave) 1.15 0.38

Third interview wave (first interview wave) 0.32* 0.18

Wald?s ?2 198.02**

Note. Reference groups are in parentheses; IPV = intimate partner violence; OR = odds ratio; RSE = robust
standard error.

*

p < .05. **p < .01.

Discussion

In the present study, the observed rate of IPV service receipt, at 15%, was substantially below a prior reported rate,
83% (Kohl et al., 2005). This discrepancy may stem from the earlier sample’s broader makeup. That sample
included relatives (other than mother) as permanent caregivers and unsubstantiated as well as substantiated cases.
The discrepancy may also stem from the fact that 30% of the present sample reported no IPV in the past year, as
close examination of the present findings ultimately revealed. Finally, because the measures employed in the data
set did not specify the particular IPV services, the meaningfulness of implications of our findings is necessarily
limited. That includes implications of the discrepancy between the present finding that IPV services were received

Page 10 of 17

When Child Welfare Caseworkers Intervene, Do Women Surviving IPV Obtain Recommended Services?

by 15% of the present sample and an earlier finding of a far higher rate of receiving such services. It is possible
that, when abused mothers they served denied experience of IPV, caseworkers referred them for generic IPV
services that the women found inappropriate or unhelpful.

The hypothesis obtained partial support from the findings: receipt of IPV services by women surviving IPV was
associated with their need for services, with specification of service need(s) in case plan, with level of caseworker–
caregiver engagement, with type of child placement, and with race/ethnicity, family income, employment status, and
education of IPV victim. The results show a strong positive association between case plans specifying IPV services
and receipt of IPV services. This suggests that accurate identification of needed services in case plans would help
mothers receive these services. Contrary to a prior study that extracted Latina mothers’ data from NSCAW-II
(Finno-Velasquez & Ogbonnaya, 2017), the present study observed no link between mothers’ receipt of IPV
services and the number of recent IPV episodes or IPV maltreatment type. A plausible explanation is that
caseworkers considered mothers’ lifetime experience of IPV in determining the need for IPV services. In addition, in
the present study, no link was observed between the engagement variable and service receipt. This suggests that it
can be difficult for mothers surviving IPV to build satisfying collaborative relationships with caseworkers (Lietz,
2011; Staudt et al., 2001).

The present results contradicted earlier ones obtained for a sample involved in foster care (Renner, 2011b). Unlike
that prior study, the present study showed that mothers with children in out-of-home placements were more likely to
obtain IPV services than mothers with children at home. It seems probable that mothers in the present sample were
eager for IPV services, perhaps expecting the services to facilitate family reunification. Moreover, close examination
of the present data revealed caseworker interventions to demonstrate positive effects. For instance, the interaction
term between placement at home and number of IPV episodes was associated in a positive direction with likelihood
of IPV service receipt (OR = 2.27, p < .05). (The interaction term is not shown in Table 3.) This association
indicated that when mothers residing with children experienced relatively many IPV episodes in the home, they
became more likely to obtain IPV services, perhaps because caseworkers worked especially diligently to ensure the
safety of such vulnerable mothers and children.

Consistent with findings of a prior study (Kohl et al., 2005), the present study indicated no significant differences
among racial/ethnic groups as to the likelihood of receiving IPV services. The present outcome variable was not
associated with education or with employment, supporting further prior findings (Cheng & Lo, 2015; Finno-
Velasquez & Ogbonnaya, 2017). However, relatively low-income mothers in the present study tended to exhibit
comparatively high likelihood of obtaining IPV services, a finding that departs from a prior result for Latinas
suggesting receipt of IPV services is not significantly associated with income (Finno-Velasquez & Ogbonnaya,
2017). A plausible explanation for the difference is that caseworkers make a special effort to help underprivileged
mothers get the services they need, regardless of mothers’ racial/ethnic backgrounds.

The present study observed a negative association between third interview wave and IPV service receipt. Thus, it
seems tha

Operations Management homework help

Zen Enchantments Yoga Studio Renovation Project

The Zen enchantment yoga studio is expanding its business by building more yoga classrooms for practice. To ensure we are offering better and enough services the society requires, including therapy centers, the dining area where there will be a variety of healthy food to be used by the customer to help them maintain or improve their body immune. Expanding the studio will bring more opportunities to the community regarding job creation and service provision.

1.1 Objective and Business Case

Zen Enchantment yoga studio’s objective is to provide the best quality of yoga experience to their customers and student that participate in yoga in our organization. By offering various yoga, we focus on capturing a more comprehensive range of customers in our enterprise, achieving sales requirements of the products we sell for yoga. We focus on acquiring and increasing our customer base by 25% by the end of the second year of operation. Zen Enchantment focuses on growing sales by 10% yearly to able the brand to expand and provide better and quality services to our customers.

1.1.1 Scope

Through the expansion of its services, the Zen Enchantment yoga studio aims to open training centers for the people interested in pursuing yoga-based careers to be trained and create a yoga-based practice community. Through rebranding and expansion of our yoga studio, the community will get services based on therapy patients who will be able to benefit from our program.

1.1.2 Statement of Work

Our yoga studio will provide quality services to our esteemed customers by offering packages that are pocket friendly and schedule flexibility that will fit eve clients’ working schedules. professional yoga instructors will be availed to our customers to ensure they get the best training for them to become better people.

1.1.3 Business Case

The competitive advantage of Zen yoga studio is that it is located in a quiet and secure area with modest equipment to meet the client’s standards and needs. We offer our customers the best experience of the releases from their busy day pressure. The enchantment avails private lessons for the cautious and discrete clients who require a personal tutor and personal space for their yoga classes. Zen yoga studio will offer free instruction and refreshments for visitors to Zen Enchantment. The instruction segment will last for 40 minutes, focusing on the exercise that will release minimum tension on the customer’s body.

1.2 Project Deliverables

At Zen yoga studio, there will be services in the five yoga practices: Bikram, Hatha, Vinyasa, Kundalini, and Anusvara yoga. We offer a beginners’ introductory class for the recruits in the studio, which helps strengthen body parts. Vinyasa yoga offers balance in stretching and flexibility to help the participants endure the exercise. There is gentle yoga for those who prefer slow yoga for their bodies. The studio will offer workshops clothing that will include shorts, athletic bras and t-shirts, and pants designed for you to feel comfortable during yoga classes. The studio will also provide additional equipment for purchase, such as belts, weights, balancing balls and mats, yoga training videos, and instructional manuals to guide the athletes during practice.

1.3 Project Organization

The Zen Enchantment yoga studio staff consists of the chief executive officer responsible for the organization’s final decision-maker. The studio administrator helps provide insights and feedback on requirements for the studio. The instructors will help guide the customers on their practices in the organization. The accountant keeps track of the organization’s financial state, the security staff to ensure safety within the premises, and the supporting team who helps run the daily activities in the studio.

References

Linlin Wang, Han Lin, & Wan Jiang. (2021). Effects of Project Leader Workplace Anxiety on Project Team Member Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Moderated Mediation Model. Project Management Journal52(4), 340–353. https://doi-org.libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/10.1177/87569728211007027

Pereira, T., Cipriano, I., Costa, T., Saraiva, M., & Martins, A. (2019). Exercise, ageing and cognitive function – Effects of a personalized physical exercise program in the cognitive function of older adults. Physiology & Behavior, 202, 8–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2019.01.018

Pinto, J. K. (2019). Project management: Achieving competitive advantage (5th ed.). Pearson.

https://online.vitalsource.com/#/books/9780134730509

Operations Management homework help

Work and Occupations
37(3) 320 –348

© The Author(s) 2010
Reprints and permission: http://www.
sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav

DOI: 10.1177/0730888410373331
http://wox.sagepub.com

The Missing Customer
and the Ever-Present
Market: Software
Developers and the
Service Economy

Seán Ó Riain1

Abstract

Although some software engineers and developers work directly with the
final users of their product to generate customized software, many do not.
However, drawing on an ethnographic study of software developers in a
U.S. firm in Ireland, this article argues that both software developers who
work closely with customers and those who do not can be thought of as
“service workers.” The article extends the analysis of the “service triangle”
of workers, managers, and customers to software workers who interact
with customers in the software development and support process. It then
uses the case of software workers who do not interact with customers to
rethink our definition of what counts as service work. For these workers,
the customer also looms large in the workplace—but only as an abstract
entity to which they should respond and be attentive, mobilized through
organizational mechanisms that transmit and simulate market pressures
rather than through concrete interactions with customers themselves. The
irony is that an organization of production that mobilizes the customer as the
driving force of the production process ultimately, and largely unintentionally,
marginalizes the customer as irrational and incompetent—an outsider in the
service economy, with little input into the technologies they end up using.

1National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland

Corresponding Author:
Seán Ó Riain, Department of Sociology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare,
Ireland
Email: Sean.oriain@nuim.ie

Ó Riain 321

Keywords

software, service work, markets, professional work, knowledge economy

Although some software engineers and developers work directly with the
final users of their product to generate customized software, many do not.
The sociology of service work has provided important insights into the trans-
formation of work when we add customers to the classic relation between
managers and workers. However, whether they work directly with customers
or not, software developers work in the service economy. Drawing on an
ethnographic study of software developers in a U.S. firm in Ireland, this arti-
cle examines software development through the lens of the service economy
to rethink our understandings of both software work and service work.

This article contributes to the literature on service work in two ways. First,
it extends the analysis of the “service triangle” of workers, managers, and
customers to software workers who interact with customers in the software
development and support process. In this respect, it applies the existing para-
digm to an occupation that is rarely conceptualized in that light (but see Bar-
ley & Kunda, 2004; Stinchcombe & Heimer, 1988). Second, it uses the case
of software workers who do not interact with customers to rethink our defini-
tion of what counts as service work. The customer also looms large in the
world of software developers who never deal directly with customers them-
selves. For these workers, the customer also appears as an abstract entity to
which they should respond and be attentive—but through organizational
mechanisms that transmit and simulate market pressures, not through con-
crete interactions with customers themselves.

The article asks, for both groups of software workers, what are the pro-
cesses through which customers, real and abstract, appear in software work.
What are the conditions that enable this? How is software work changed by
the presence of the customer? To answer these questions requires that we
expand the terms on which we have approached the sociology of service
work.

Service Work, Service Triangles,
and the Service Economy
Korczynski (2009) defines front line service work as “work undertaken
where the central job task involves interaction with a service-recipient and
where the job status is below that of professional” (p. 952). This definition
clearly identifies some central elements of the understanding of service work
in sociology, two of which are critical to this article. First, research has

322 Work and Occupations 37(3)

focused on workers below the professional level—workers who are rela-
tively weak in the labor market and often disempowered in their relations not
only with managers but also with customers. Second, our understanding of
the service triangle has been fundamentally interactional—the triangle oper-
ates as real relations between actors who meet in the workplace. In particular,
analyses of service work focus on relations between the producers of a ser-
vice (or occasionally a good) and the final users or consumers of that ser-
vice.1 At the risk of blurring the focused lens of the sociology of service
work, in this article I seek to expand each of these dimensions of Korczyns-
ki’s definition of front line service work.

The Curious Case of Professionals and Service Work
Korczynski (2009) defines service work as confined to workers below the
level of professionals. However, although this serves to focus attention on a
clearly defined group of workers, it may in fact make it more difficult to
identify which features of the service work experience are linked to the inter-
actional work in the service encounter and which are linked to a more general
weakness in the labor market and the workplace. Examining professional
workers allows us to examine the varieties of service relationships that exist
in the workplace, particularly given that professionals are often dominant
partners in such relationships (Abbott, 1988). Indeed, sociologists examining
professional work have often been more concerned to protect the “service
recipient” from the “service worker” rather than to critique their power as
customers.

Most professionals have in one way or another been service providers,
often interacting on an ongoing basis with the service recipients. Professional
work was an early form of marketized service work, operating typically from
a position of high status and often dealing with relatively privileged clients.
The development of the welfare state and the corporate economy has shifted
these relations somewhat as the typical professional service interaction has
shifted from the face-to-face relation to a contracting client to professionals
acting in the service of hierarchical employers (public and private) to manage
and “serve” that organization’s “clients.” Furthermore, it appears that “pro-
fessionalism” as a mode of organization has been losing ground in the face of
the commercialization of professional work—transforming the social rela-
tions of professional work and professional identities (e.g., Hanlon, 1994, on
accountants, and Barley & Kunda, 2004, on software contractors).

Previous research has shed significant light on the forces shaping software
developers’ work lives. For example, Perlow (1997) finds that long hours are

Ó Riain 323

reinforced by the job insecurity of the industry. Workers dedicate themselves
intensely to one project so that they will be asked to participate in the next, in
what Perlow calls a “vicious work–time cycle.” Similarly, Sharone’s (2004)
study of a Silicon Valley software team shows that the pressure to work long
hours and commit to work above all else is reinforced by individualized pay
structures. Software developers are ranked in relation to one another, so that
their “performance pay” becomes what is in essence “competition pay,” driv-
ing a competitive pressure to work longer and display a greater commitment
than their colleagues.

If labor markets matter, so do the forms of coordination and organization
of software work. Perlow (2001) finds significant interfirm and cross-national
variability in hours and in time norms in software workplaces in India, China,
and Hungary. She links this to the modes of coordination within firms where
individualized relationships created a demand for long and overlapping time
schedules where more structured team-based patterns of organization allowed
for better management of time. Deadlines, driven by crisis management,
reinforced the pressures associated with project work (Ó Riain, 2000; Per-
low, 1997). Outside the firm, although peers in the software developer occu-
pational community could be a resource in coping with the twin pressures of
intense work and job insecurity, the need to maintain reputation among the
peer group could also be a further source of pressure on workers (Barley &
Kunda, 2004; Osnowitz, 2006).

These pressures seemed less extreme in Ireland—the hours worked
appear somewhat fewer than in the United States (although good data are
hard to find), and research by Aileen O’Carroll (2004) shows that, in many
Irish firms, workers were able to impose a set of time norms of their own,
which included a more reasonable set of expectations around working to
deadlines and restricting longer hours. Nonetheless, O’Carroll finds that
some firms were characterized by exceptionally long hours, partly because
the lack of industry norms around working hours allowed for a great deal of
variability at the level of the firm. For website production workers, Damarin
(2006) finds that “fluid jobs allow workers some autonomy in production,
but little control over the wider organization of work” (p. 429)—again
allowing for significant pressures and variability, even as workers have sig-
nificant autonomy in work itself.

Lurking behind these pressures from the labor market and forms of orga-
nizational coordination is the ever-present shadow of the market, experienced
as an intense set of pressures—even if somewhat indirectly. We know rela-
tively little about the mechanisms through which these market pressures

324 Work and Occupations 37(3)

manifest themselves within the software workplace. The shift of professional
work more firmly within hierarchies has combined with commercialization
of professional work to place professionals more firmly within the triad of
worker, manager, and customer that is at the heart of service work. Profes-
sionals may experience the same pressures from customers and service inter-
actions as other service workers, despite their greater relative power. This is
particularly the case with professions, such as software, that do not exercise
the kinds of tight occupational control and closure as the most traditionally
high-status professions (such as law and medicine). Such professions have
been incorporated within state and corporate hierarchies since early in their
occupational histories and have typically exerted much less control over
labor supply and other processes of social closure.

Frenkel, Korcyznski, Shire, and Tam (1999) have examined software
development as a form of frontline service work. They find significant differ-
ences between the work of software developers in “knowledge-intensive”
workflows and that of sales or service workers. The software developers are
more interdependent with their service recipients, service is negotiated, and
there is a significant degree of ambiguity regarding who constitutes the most
powerful party in the service relation. Significantly, Frenkel et al. find that
although customers can be a source of significant pressure for professional
workers, the service triangle is characterized by varying degrees of discon-
nection among its different elements and shifting and varying alliances between
customers, managers, and workers.

Similarly, Barley and Kunda (2004) document the complexities for soft-
ware contractors of navigating between clients, staffing agencies, and occu-
pational communities. For these workers, clients are a regular and direct
presence in their working lives. But in the process of entering the service
economy, software developers were pushed to renegotiate the meaning of
professionalism itself:

To close deals contractors also had to engage in complex, threeway
bargaining with hiring managers and agents. This process exposed
contractors to an unexpected reality. Bargaining was more than just
haggling over rates that maximized income. Contractors discovered
that they also had to negotiate the very definition of their skills. . . .
There was always a gap between what contractors believed they could
do, what they said they could do, and what the clients claimed they
wanted. To land a job, contractors had to identify and bridge this gap.
(Barley & Kunda, 2006, pp. 48-49)

Ó Riain 325

Software developer contractors were defined as much by their service work
as by their professionalism—and the two were blended in their everyday
lives. In those everyday lives, their often rewarding opportunities were bal-
anced by significant anxiety and insecurity—which were aggravated by an
institutional context that assumed firm-based, bureaucratically organized
employment.

The implications of Barley and Kunda’s (2006) study and Frenkel et al.’s
(1999) discussion of software and other professionals in knowledge-inten-
sive work processes is that an analysis of service work remains highly rele-
vant to professional workers. However, we still know relatively little about
how such an analysis can inform our understanding of the software work
process or about the mechanisms that link these broader conditions of the
service economy to work itself. This gap is particularly wide for software
developers who work for employers, rather than as contractors. Such an anal-
ysis requires an extension of the fundamentally interactional framework
through which we have understood service work to date.

Dancing With Triangles: From Customer
Interactions to Product Markets
The “service triangle” of customer, worker, and manager has been central to
the enlightening analyses of service work that have proliferated in recent
years. This has brought us important new insights into the organization of
work and the politics of new forms of work and has sharpened our focus on
aspects of work that had previously been neglected—including emotions
(Hochschild, 1983; Lopez, 2006) and the body (Lan, 2001). However, although
interaction with service recipients appears to be increasing, it is neither
universal nor necessarily synonymous with the service economy.

The “service work triangle” is a significant element of the service econ-
omy but does not fully describe its social relations. The significance of the
customer’s presence in service interactions is that the pressures of product
markets are brought directly into the interactional world of the service
worker. In the classic dyadic view of the workplace, workers were subject to
the pressures of organizational hierarchies and labor markets but remained
somewhat insulated from the competitive pressures in product markets,
which loomed large for their employers. The “service triangle” focuses on
interaction with customers as the primary mechanism through which product
market pressures are introduced into the workplace—it connects service
work and the service economy.

326 Work and Occupations 37(3)

However, a focus on “service triangles” neglects the diverse range of
mechanisms that can transmit product market pressures into the workplace.
For some, all workers and workplaces now exist within an economy where
“meeting the demands of the ‘sovereign’ consumer becomes the new and
overriding institutional imperative” (Keat & Abercrombie, 1991, p. 3). A
“culture of the customer” plays a critical role in incorporating workers into a
market society (DuGay & Salaman, 1992). For DuGay and Salaman (1992),
the macro-level trends toward marketization are linked to internal organiza-
tional processes through a discourse of enterprise within which “the cus-
tomer” plays a critical role in linking “external” and “internal” processes
(p. 617). In this view, increased awareness of customers and other “service
recipients” and the rhetorical mobilization of the “sovereign consumer” bring
the dynamic of service work triangles into multiple different kinds of work-
places. However, this approach substitutes a totalizing macro-level view for
the interactional level of analysis, weakening our ability to analyze the diver-
sity of ways in which service work and service economy are connected.

More promising is Fuller and Smith’s (1991) analysis of managerial use of
customer feedback to manage employees—what they call “management by
customers” or “consumer control.” The incorporation of customer feedback
(through comment cards, evaluations, etc.) becomes an important tool for
managers in redesigning work processes and in controlling individual
employees. Crucially, for our purposes, this work identifies one of the mech-
anisms through which organizations can mobilize the “service economy”
within the workplace.

Similarly, one of the goals of this article is to explore how software work
is shaped by its location within a service economy, without sacrificing the
rich analysis of concrete organizational and social processes that has charac-
terized studies of service work to date. The move to the macro level of analy-
sis opens up the analysis of work in the service economy and not simply the
analysis of service work itself (Glucksmann, 2009; Sallaz, 2002). However,
in that move, the specificity, empirical richness, and groundedness of the
sociology of interactional service work can be lost.

The analysis of organizational processes is crucial to avoiding this, and
this has directed analysts to pay increased attention to the place of service
work within the “hegemonic regime” of the workplace (e.g., Sallaz’s, 2002,
study of casino dealers, and Sherman’s, 2007, study of luxury hotel workers)
or the broader social formations of labor (Glucksmann, 2009). Lopez (2006)
argues that the relations of service work are profoundly influenced by the
organization of the workplace itself. In his study of a nursing home, Lopez
(2006) finds “an organization that self-consciously tried to create structural

Ó Riain 327

opportunities for meaningful social relationships between caregivers and cli-
ents” and where there was “organizational support for ongoing human rela-
tionships in which the emotional rules can be renegotiated by the participants”
(p. 134). Such a perspective integrates the insight that managers and organi-
zations profoundly shape how “the customer” enters the service triangle and
the perspective that emotional and service work can take both troubling and
potentially enriching forms.

Similarly, I conceptualize the service work triangle as just one element of
a broader phenomenon of the increasing interpenetration of organizational
hierarchies (and markets for governance), labor markets, and product mar-
kets. In addition to the extension of the dominant “service triangle” frame-
work for analyzing service work to software developers who interact with
customers, this focus on the broader organization of the service economy
allows us to examine service work in the absence of the customer.

Research Method
To examine these questions, I return to an ethnography of a software devel-
opment team undertaken in 1997 in Ireland, as the high-tech boom was well
under way (Ó Riain, 2000, 2004). To investigate work organization I under-
took an ethnographic case study in early 1997 of USTech.2 The study lasted
3 months and was carried out with the permission and assistance of company
management and the full knowledge of company employees. USTech was
well established in Ireland, having located there in the 1970s and becoming
one of the early success stories of Irish industrial policy. For many years, it
was one of Ireland’s primary computer hardware production operations, with
a reputation for high quality. The hardware manufacturing operations of
USTech Ireland were dismantled with massive layoffs in the late 1980s and
early 1990s, leaving local management scrambling for the operation’s sur-
vival and turning to a complete reliance on the local pool of software skills.

The case study included 12 weeks ethnographic research on a software
team, 20 interviews carried out with engineers and developers working in the
company, 15 interviews with company managers and attendance at 15 team,
department, and management meetings (plus team meetings of the team in
which I worked). For the analysis of software work where customers were
present, I rely primarily on interviews with managers and software develop-
ers and team meetings of two parts of the company—software testing and
support for a product called TPS and applications development and consult-
ing around a technological system called ObjectWorld. These two parts of the
company are of particular interest as they involved more direct relations with

328 Work and Occupations 37(3)

customers than the software development team—dealing with customer dif-
ficulties with the product in the case of testing and support and carrying out
new systems development in close contact with the customer (and often at
the customer’s facility) in the case of applications development.

My research on noninteractive software work was more detailed as I spent
12 weeks working on a software development team as a technical writer
compiling a manual and online help text. The five long-term members of the
team were employed by USTech but were working on a contract designing a
product for Womble Software, a spin-off from USTech headquarters in the
Unite States (we were known as the “Womble team”). Womble were design-
ing a system for the networked delivery of training videos and other content
that was designed to allow users to manage the pace and content of their own
training programs.

In addition to the team leader, Seamus, the Womble team consisted of two
permanent (Dan and Conor) and two long-term contract (Jim and Paul) staff.
During this time, I participated fully in the work of the team and wrote a user
guide for our product, which was installed on the system as online help for
users of the system. I sat in the same cubicle as the rest of the team, attended
team meetings, and interacted closely with them on a regular basis on deci-
sions regarding the user guide.

I became an accepted member of the team, although my researcher status
was never forgotten. Working on the product itself and proving myself of
some use was essential to this acceptance, which itself was helped by the
flow of contract personnel and others through the team on shorter assign-
ments than my own. Furthermore, I was the person on the team who dealt
most directly with the “user” side of the product—carrying out rough testing
by attempting to use prototypes of the system, writing help text for users,
and occasionally making comments regarding design features to the team
leader. As we waited for the design team in California to produce “screens”
for us that would be the basis for the “front end” of the system (i.e., what
users would see), I generated some rough drawings of the screens of the
system we were designing, illustrating the logical flow of each screen. These
became the rough template for the team’s development work. A critical
moment in my acceptance in to the team came when I identified a logical
flaw in the path that the user followed through the system, based on my
rough sketches. Gingerly pointing this out to the team leader, I was relieved
a few minutes later when he turned to me and said, “Good catch, Seán.” The
moment was not lost on the developers in the cubicle—I had cleared the
competence bar (set pretty low for visiting sociologists) and proved myself
as a member of the team.

Ó Riain 329

Organizational Conditions of the Service Economy:
The Blurring of Markets and Hierarchies

Customers bring pressures with them because they transmit the demands of
product market competition into the work process. However, these pressures
from product markets may also be transmitted into the worlds of different
workers in other ways. This section outlines a variety of mechanisms through
which software developers’ work is shaped by product markets and their
interaction with the more widely recognized influences of organizational
hierarchies and labor markets on the organization of work. It identifies these
general organizational conditions and then goes on to explore how these play
out in contexts where customers are present and in those where they are not.

The dominant organizational forms in the information technology indus-
try have shifted from the hierarchical bureaucracies of IBM and Digital, with
strong guarantees of long-term employment and corporate cultures (Kunda,
1992), to the networked system of open innovation, where increasing num-
bers of technologists work in smaller firms (Mowery, 2009) and have careers
that stretch across a number of firms (Brown, Haltiwanger, & Lane, 2006).
However, hierarchies have not disappeared. In effect, market relations have
developed within and across hierarchical boundaries, blurring the lines
between hierarchy and market. In this section, we explore how these pro-
cesses work through the markets for capital and labor to transmit product
market pressures more directly into the software work process.

The Market for Capital
Earlier we emphasized the importance of the incorporation of professionals
within managerial hierarchies. However, the primary mechanism for trans-
mitting the pressures of the market and the customer to software workers
is the marketization of organizational structures themselves. One of the
most significant organizational transformations of recent decades has been
the blending of markets with hierarchies, placing units within the same
organization in competition with each other and making them responsible
for their own survival through contracts with internal and external
customers.

USTech had gone through a particularly significant transformation just
prior to the time I spent there. Once a company on the model of IBM, the new
USTech had moved firmly to the more marketized structure. The effect on
USTech Ireland was substantial—as one manager put it:

330 Work and Occupations 37(3)

The goal up to now has been to support USTech as a corporation get-
ting to customers. Now we are starting to think about what can we
provide to third parties? It’s part of keeping us secure, not having all
our eggs in the USTech basket.

Or, as the financial director put it,

In the old days, US HQ was 90% of USTech Ireland business.
Nowadays, we have a range of customers. In the old days we could
rely on Big Brother in the US. The budget these days has to be spoken
for by 15 to 20 major sponsors.

Other departments within the company itself (including within the Irish
facility) were increasingly thought of as “internal customers.” The informa-
tion systems manager for USTech Ireland spoke of the issues in dealing with
other departments in the Irish division in the following terms: “At USTech
Ireland the users are professionals and are harder to control. . . . We had one
guy started today and half his role is planning customer [i.e., Departments at
USTech Ireland] relations.”

USTech has therefore gone from a hierarchy within markets to a firm that
increasingly consisted of markets within a hierarchy, or certainly a hierarchy
that has blended market forms with the existing hierarchical structure. In
particular the subunits of the firm are increasingly treated as units competing
in markets with very little central funding or services provided to them. In the
process, “intermediary customers” between the producer and the ultimate
user have become significant actors in the work process. The organizational
buffers between workers and markets have been weakened—but largely
through the growth of intermediary customers, rather than through the disap-
pearance of organizational structures.

So too have the financial and budgetary buffers. As the USTech Ireland
Managing Director notes, “I don’t have a budget, it’s a customer style relation-
ship within the company and with clients. This has a big impact in that we only
provide services that we get paid for.” The Financial Director notes the difficul-
ties that this raises for collective shared resources that are used across groups,
projects, and different clients (e.g., basic research, HR, information systems).

We have to be careful that the market will stand what the inter-group
costs are. We work back from what the customer in the field will pay.
If we grow by another hundred staff we’ll be able to spread fixed costs
across a broader base, we need the critical mass.

Ó Riain 331

Management of these intermediary relationships is a delicate task. USTech
Ireland has to manage relations with both its customers dotted across Europe
and with the central USTech offices in Silicon Valley—where some other
sections of USTech may in practice be competing for business from USTech
Ireland’s customers. Elsewhere, a team worked closely with another group in
Europe while at the same time seeking to use that support to develop to the
point where it could compete with them. The lines between market and hier-
archy are significantly blurred.

Customers may have to be discarded or disciplined, but only at some risk
to your own group—and even career:

USTech Ireland relies on service organizations affiliated to other parts
of USTech or its partners as their customers in Europe. If those service
organizations are doing a bad job we need to let Silicon Valley execu-
tives know. It’s a delicate job because we still need those organizations
around Europe so we can get into those markets. . . . It’s very delicate
with the service organizations because they could potentially be
involved in my appraisal. (Gerry, Operations Manager)

Similarly, obtaining support from within the organizational hierarchy of
USTech itself can be critical to market success with customers: “We want a
mandate for business process work with ObjectWorld—but it’s hard to get cus-
tomers to tell the corporation that they want that for USTech Ireland unless the
corporation is telling customers that’s what we can do” (Mike, Consulting
Executive). Mike is caught between hierarchy and market—needing the hier-
archy to tell customers that his unit can supply the services they need but need-
ing the customers to pressure the corporate hierarchy on behalf of his unit.

Therefore, a critical organizational mechanism in the transmission of mar-
ket pressure to the world of the worker is the role of intermediary customers
and “sponsors” that form a chain from the end-user customer to the worker.
Where the firm at USTech had stood firmly between the customer and the
worker 10 years before, these pressures were now transmitted to great effect
by the formation of units at USTech that had the autonomy to sign contracts
but the pressure to support themselves through external customers.

Markets for Labor
The particular character of the labor market in software also generates closer
links between worker and product market than in many other industries. This

332 Work and Occupations 37(3)

is particularly so when the technological expertise required for the work is
both part of the production process, part of the product itself, and indeed part
of the process of servicing the product once it is in use. For example, at the
time of my research, Java technologies were emerg

Operations Management homework help



Unit IV Mini Project

Instructions

EFAS Table

Using the information gathered from your SWOT analysis conducted in Unit II, create an external factor analysis (EFAS) table for the company you researched. Use Microsoft Word, or a similar program, to create your table. It should have five columns. The first column heading should be titled External Factors, the second column should be titled Weight, the third column should be titled Rating, the fourth column should be titled Weighted Score, and the fifth column should be titled Comments. You may also use the provided template.

See the attached example EFAS table. 

1. In the External Factors column, list at least six opportunities you saw in the company you researched. Underneath the opportunities, list at least six threats you saw in the company you researched.

2. In the Weight column, assign an importance factor to each of these issues. It is important to note that whenever working with weighted averages, the weight column should always total 1.0, or 100%, regardless of how many factors are included in the EFAS analysis. It is up to the analyst to decide how much weight each individual external factor is assigned based on the probable impact on a particular company’s current strategic position. The higher the weight, the more important the factor to the current and future success of the company. An important factor may have a weight of 0.5 (50%), while a less important factor may have a weight of .05 (5%). When all is finished, however, all factor weights should total 1.0, or 100%. You may not be privy to the exact information for this company, so in some cases you will need to use your best judgment. (You will justify your weighting in column five.)

3. In the Rating column, assign a rating factor from 5.0-1.0 (5.0 is outstanding; 1.0 is poor). These ratings are based on the company’s response to that particular factor. It is your judgment call on how the company is currently dealing with each specific factor. Once again, you may need to make an estimate in this area if you are not privy to all of the information. (You will justify your weighting in column five.)

4. In the Weighted Score column, multiply the weight from column 2 by the rating in column 3 to get the factor’s weighted score.

5. In the Comments column, explain why a particular factor was selected and how its weight and rating were estimated.

6. At the bottom of column 4, add the weighted scores for the external factors. Is the company doing better or worse than others in the same industry? Complete this answer underneath your table.

Format your assignment using APA Style. Use your own words, and include citations and references as needed to avoid plagiarism.

Operations Management homework help

Sport Industry Segment Presentation

Student Name

My Roadmap

Foundations:

Personal Attributes: Organized, Self-Motivated, Great Team and Individual Worker, Compiling Data, Strong Verbal Communicator

Top Fiver Career Interests

Front Office Operations

Sports Economic

Social Media Marketing

Data & Analytics Department

Player Representation

Working in Sports

Problem Solving

Creating New Experiences

Current Issues & Trends

Corporate Sponsorship

Trend: Brand Activism

Consumers want brands to stand for something significant

Issue: Physical signage is becoming less and less significant

Meredith Starkey, V.P. of Sponsorships at T-Mobile, says organizations need to evaluate how much in-ballpark signage is necessary

Social Media Marketing

Trend: The increasing popularity of influencers in marketing

Consumers would rather associate with a specific individual than a brand

Issue: Lack of skilled and experienced employees

43% of marketers sited lack of skill and experience as biggest issue (Sprout Social)

Sports Agency

Trend: Agencies creating content for their clients

Octagon has begun to create a draft series for their NHL clients

Issue: Increased athlete involvement

Players want more of a say in negotiation and personal marketing (Player empowerment)

Organizational Chart: Football Club

Melissa Jannetta

Job Opening: Social Media Marketing

Oklahoma City Thunder: Social Media Intern

Requirements…

Enrolled in college with a junior or senior level standing

Pursuing a degree in marketing or communications

Preferred bilingual candidates (specifically Mandarin or Chinese)

Proficient in Microsoft Excel & Word

Job Opening: Sports Agent

XFL: Player Representatives

Requirements…

Looking for associate seniority level

Full-Time agents

Also requires a submission of players and coaches you believe the XFL should consider

League kicks off in 2020

Maddy Stover: Former Social Media Coordinator, Reeves International, Inc.

Education: Southern Methodist University – Cox School Of Business; Bachelor of Business Administration, Marketing

Student-athlete for the SMU Equestrian team

Member of the Delta Gamma Sorority

Started: PR Intern for Jennifer Wood Media

Currently: Senior Coordinator of Social Responsibility for Major League Soccer

Advice: Don’t be afraid to start small

One Interesting Thing: Learn other applications in your spare time, like Photoshop, Adobe Video Editor, Excel, etc.

Melissa Jannetta: Vice President of
Business Development, FC Dallas

Education: Michigan State University; Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing

Played women’s soccer for Michigan State University

MBA from Southern New Hampshire University

Started: Intern for Anheuser Busch (Sponsorship)

Currently: Vice President of Business Development for FC Dallas

Advice: Who you know is just as important as what you know

One Interesting Thing: Sales is important; in sports, you gotta be able to sell yourself

Andrew Guerra: Agent, Roc Nation Baseball

Education: Rice University/Saint Louis University; B.A. in Psychology

Student-Athlete: Baseball

University of Oregon: MBA in Marketing

Started: Recruiting Coordinator, MVP Sports

Currently: Agent, Roc Nation Baseball – Texas Region

Advice: “The agency business is cut throat… no one gives a [expletive] about you. You have to be a lone wolf and eat what you kill.”

One Interesting Thing: The name on the front of the business card is more important than the name on the back

The Future of These Industries

For Sports Agents…

The Threat of Artificial Intelligence

Could see shift of agents’ focus to athlete marketing and branding (iABM)

For Social Media Marketing…

Exclusive Content for Social Media

Live Content  Fans interact in real time… at the game

For Corporate Sponsorship…

Less Physical, More Digital  Sponsorship agreements will focus less on in stadium signage and more digital and interpersonal activation (We Are Social UK)

Operations Management homework help

LO2: Assess own skills, competences and the different learning and

development approaches

Assess own abilities, skills and competences for a specific job role.

· Choose a specific job with a level higher than you are from the hospitality Industry (Hotel or a Restaurant), and Identify it.

· Job Role Introduction:

· …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Determine 4 essential skills & abilities for the chosen role. (add reasons to each point)

1.

2.

3.

4.

Determine 4 essential competencies for the chosen role. (add reasons to each point)

1.

2.

3.

4.

· Determine your own strengths and weaknesses you possess in the chosen position.

· Considerate the best development approaches to enhance your Personal and professional development that let you overcome your weaknesses within your chosen job role. (support your answer by explaining each point in detail).

Note: The table here can help you answer the above 2 questions:

Strengths

Weaknesses

Development Approach

· Provide a valid conclusion or reason judgement on 1. your strengths and weaknesses 2. your development approach

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

· Considerate the threats and the opportunities for the chosen role

Opportunities

Threats

· Provide a logic debate to convince the employer that the skills you own play positively against the other competent.

· ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Review a range of learning theories and approaches used for personal and professional development processes.

· Choose 2 of the learning theories ( ) and 2 of the learning approaches ( ) and explain each one and its strengths and weaknesses.

· 1.

Strengths

a.

b.

Weaknesses

a.

b.

· 2.

Strengths

a.

b.

Weaknesses

a.

b.

· 3.

Strengths

a.

b.

Weaknesses

a.

b.

· 4.

Strengths

a.

b.

· Weaknesses

a.

b.

· Make a table for the changes or adjustments and additions that suggested by you to enhance the theory.

The name of the theory

Suggested changes

1.

2.

3.

4.


الهدف الثاني: تقييم المهارات الخاصة والكفاءات وأساليب التعلم والتطوير المختلفة

تقييم القدرات والمهارات والكفاءات الخاصة لدور وظيفي محدد.

– اختيار دور وظيفي بمستو اعلى من اللذي انت عليه من صناعة الضيافة (فندق أو مطعم) ، وتعريفه والتقديم عنه.

– مقدمة عن الدور الوظيفي:

– ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………….

– حدد 4 مهارات وقدرات أساسية للدور المختار. (أضف أسبابًا لكل نقطة)

1.

2.

3.

4.

· حدد 4 كفاءات أساسية للدور المختار. (أضف أسبابًا لكل نقطة)

1.

2.

3.

4.

– تحديد نقاط القوة والضعف لديك في المنصب المختار.

– ضع في اعتبارك أفضل مناهج التطوير لتعزيز تطورك الشخصي والمهني الذي يتيح لك التغلب على نقاط ضعفك في دورك الوظيفي الذي اخترته. (ادعم إجابتك بشرح كل نقطة بالتفصيل).

ملاحظة: يمكن أن يساعدك الجدول الموجود هنا في الإجابة عن السؤالين أعلاه:

طريقة التطوير المناسبة

نقاط الضعف

نقاط القوة

· قدم استنتاجًا صالحًا أو حكمًا منطقيًا على 1. نقاط قوتك وضعفك 2. منهجك التنموي

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

· ضمن التهديدات والفرص للدور المختار

المهددات

الفرص

– قدم مناظرة منطقية لإقناع صاحب العمل أن المهارات التي تمتلكها تلعب بشكل إيجابي ضد الآخرين المنافسين.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………… ..

مراجعة مجموعة من نظريات التعلم والأساليب المستخدمة في عمليات التطوير الشخصي والمهني.

– اختر 2 من نظريات التعلم و 2 من مناهج التعلم )اشرح جميع النظريات وتحدث عن عن نقاط القوة ونقاط الضعف لكل واحدة من النظريات ومناهج التعلم)

– 1.

نقاط الضعف

أ.

ب.

نقاط القوة

أ.

ب.

– 2.

نقاط الضعف

أ.

ب.

نقاط القوة

أ.

ب.

– 3.

نقاط الضعف

أ.

ب.

نقاط القوة

أ.

ب.

– 4.

نقاط الضعف

أ.

ب.

نقاط القوة

أ.

ب.

– عمل جدول للتغييرات أو التعديلات والإضافات التي تقترحها لتعزيز النظرية.

التغييرات\ الاضافات المقترحة

اسم النظرية/ المنهج

Operations Management homework help

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Date and Time: Thursday, April 14, 2022 2:42:00 PM PDT

Job Number: 169021722

Documents (2)

1. Cloud-based software to help Hubbard County Social Services staff telework — caseworkers and social

workers can access electronic case files from anywhere

Client/Matter: -None-

Search Terms: Service referral software for case workers in IPV and Interacting with case workers

Search Type: Natural Language

Narrowed by:

Content Type Narrowed by
News -None-

2. Bibliography

Cloud-based software to help Hubbard County Social Services staff telework —
caseworkers and social workers can access electronic case files from anywhere

The Pilot-Independent (Walker, Minnesota)

July 11, 2020

Copyright 2020 The Pilot-Independent, American Consolidated Media.
Distributed by Newsbank, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Section: NEWS

Length: 558 words

Byline: Gail Deboer

Body

Hubbard County Department of Social Services (DSS) is investing in new technology to help staff telework during
the COVID-19 pandemic and well into the future.

“With COVID, this solution plays a huge, vital role in how we do business now. I also look forward to staff working
from home in the future. This solution will allow us to telework efficiently and perform as a public agency better than
we were before,” said Brian Ophus, social services director, Hubbard County DSS.

Hubbard County DSS will first provide a centralized document management system anyone in the agency can
access. Staff will use Northwoods’ web-based software, Capture™, to electronically scan and index documents into
the enterprise content management system, OnBase® by Hyland. Agency-wide access to case files will reduce
duplicate work, such as workers in different program areas collecting the same information from clients.

The agency’s previous solution digitized a small percentage of documents, but they were not accessible outside of
the office or to workers in other units, which impacted client service.

“We have to make things easier on the client and information more accessible because when they come to us,
they are not in the best place in their life. My focus is getting a centralized document system to help make it easier
for the client to move forward,” Ophus said.

The next phase will provide Northwoods’ software Traverse® to adult social services and child protection social
workers to collect, view and share case content from anywhere at any time. Social workers will use Traverse’s web-
based application to scan and upload documents and a companion mobile app to easily take photos and complete
forms during home visits.

In addition to enabling remote work, the solution will have numerous benefits:

Page 2 of 3

Cloud-based software to help Hubbard County Social Services staff telework — caseworkers and social
workers can access electronic case files from anywhere

Relieve stress on caseworkers and social workers managing high caseloads

Reduced burden on county IT staff to maintain the cloud-based solution

Enable adult social services and child protection social workers to spend more time with clients

“The biggest challenge was that everything was still on paper. What took an hour and a half to find a document will
take 30 to 40 seconds. Traverse will allow social workers to be more efficient and spend more time with clients and
take a lot of stress off the workers,” Ophus said.

Hubbard County DSS is funding the project by utilizing consolidated funding through state and federal grants
available to help individuals under 200 percent of poverty

“Whether in the office or teleworking, frontline workers need real-time access to information to best serve their
clients. Northwoods’ solutions will help Hubbard County DSS workers access, collect and share key data and
documents from anywhere,” said Chris McConnell, chief business development officer, Northwoods.

Northwoods develops customized, high-tech software solutions for adult & aging, child support, child welfare and
economic assistance. We help state and county human services agencies do more with less and get the results
they need. Nearly 45,000 caseworkers across the country use our solutions to manage, collect, view and share
content and data more efficiently. As a result, agencies improve service delivery, maximize productivity, make
informed decisions and achieve better outcomes. Northwoods is headquartered in Dublin, Ohio.

Classification

Language: ENGLISH

Publication-Type: Newspaper

Subject: TELECOMMUTING (93%); COVID CORONAVIRUS (90%); COVID-19 CORONAVIRUS (90%); SERVICE
WORKERS (90%); SOCIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENTS (90%); SOCIAL WORK (90%); CHILD PROTECTIVE
SERVICES (89%); COUNTY GOVERNMENT (89%); BUSINESS NEWS (78%); COMPANY ACTIVITIES &
MANAGEMENT (78%); CUSTOMER SERVICE (78%); HOME BASED EMPLOYMENT (78%); INFECTIOUS
DISEASE (78%); NEGATIVE SOCIETAL NEWS (78%); PANDEMICS (78%); TECHNICIANS & TECHNOLOGICAL
WORKERS (78%); NEGATIVE NEWS (73%); GRANTS & GIFTS (68%); CHILD CUSTODY & SUPPORT (64%);
POVERTY & HOMELESSNESS (60%)

Industry: CLOUD COMPUTING (90%); COMPUTER SOFTWARE (90%); DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT (90%);
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (89%); MOBILE APPLICATIONS (72%)

Page 3 of 3

Cloud-based software to help Hubbard County Social Services staff telework — caseworkers and social
workers can access electronic case files from anywhere

Geographic: UNITED STATES (79%)

Load-Date: July 12, 2020

End of Document

Bibliography

1. Cloud-based software to help Hubbard County Social Services staff telework — caseworkers and social
workers can access electronic case files from anywhere, NEWS,

End of Document

  • Cloud-based software to help Hubbard County Social Services staff telework — caseworkers and social workers can access electronic case files from anywhere
    • Body
    • Classification

Operations Management homework help

Literature search topics from initial meeting:

Library hyperlink www.ewu.edu/library/

Focus of Study: Caseworkers: Research to see if information on the following is available

What is not working in terms of case management as it relates to serving IPV intimate partner violence services. Can we isolate what is not working specifically to software used to direct victims to services?(

Information on failings of software from caseworker point of view?

Information on failings from victim point of view?

Software usage and software dependence

Salary range

Career length

Why do they leave the career?

Education level/background

Personal characteristics

Lifestyle

Competitor software:

Wellsky and BA Focus

Day to life of caseworker

How can caseworkers be better served by software

ID referral services you identify

What compels caseworkers to use SAS?

Do they have the right data at the right time?

What is Eccovia

Eccovia is a software company that seeks to assist the health and human services through case and data management. These fields are varied and numerous, but they all share one thing in common: people. We support organizations ranging from healthcare and behavioral health to homeless management and refugee resettlement. By helping our partners coordinate and integrate with both public and private organizations across every segment of HHS, our services ensure that people are at the center of their own care.

Eccovia’s Mission Statement and Values

Eccovia aims to be the clear vendor of choice in the Health & Human and Social Services community and demonstrates our expertise through client referrals, peer validation, and continued growth in the market. We provide unlimited opportunities to people in “helping organizations” so that they can be more successful in accomplishing their goals. We are continually improving our products, services, and effectiveness.

Operations Management homework help

ESSAY

Please choose a video from the learning material topic videos below to watch and submit a two full-page written essay addressing the following questions:

· What are the key concepts from the chosen material?

· How could you apply the concepts in your career (I’m a business data analyst in a consulting company) or life?

Your essay must be well-written and follow the APA format (Times New Roman 12 double space) and style, the essay must be at least 2 full pages in length.

Learning materials video link below:

    

· How to Get People to Follow You by Simon Sinek 

https://youtu.be/zFr_-oFmPRE

· Are You a Giver or a Taker? by Adam Grant  

· The Keys to Building Character by Leila Janah  

https://youtu.be/0gVTnivW2lE


  

· Five Phases that can Change Your Life by Adam Braun  https://youtu.be/Z8oE2kqVXkk

· How to Unlock Genius and Uncover Your Superpower by Jim Kwik 

https://youtu.be/EjdDnCN9yyE

· Unexpected Ways to Get Ahead by Todd Yasui 

https://youtu.be/vInK-KK0-Tc

· Rules to a Less Complicated Life by Lou Holtz     

https://youtu.be/8YFTJuJkrts

· The Growth Mindset by Carol Dweck      

https://youtu.be/KC2o90x8Ats

· Catalyst for a Brighter Future by Jeff Hoffman

Operations Management homework help



اصدارأحكام وتوصيات صحيحة حول كيفية تحسين عمليات الموارد البشرية والوثائق في كل مرحلة من مراحل دورة حياة الموارد البشرية من خلال :

Make valid judgements and recommendations on how HR process and documents at each stage of the HR life cycle can be improved through :


شرح مفصل لمراحل دورة حياة الموظف وذلك من خلال :

a. An examination to the different stages of the HR life cycle applied to that job by doing the following


تعريف دورة حياة الموظف : –


HR-Life Cycle’s Definition

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

:…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


اختر دورا معينا من وظائف واشرح عنها ( المسؤوليات والمتطلبات )


موظف حجوزات ، موظف استقبال ، موظف تدبير منزلي ، مساعد شيف ، مقدم الطعام او اي وظيف من المستويات التي يبدأ بها طالب متخرج حديثا

( اختر واحد )

Choose on role (Reservation Employee, Receptionist, House Keeper, Assistant Chef & Waiter), then introduce this role responsibilities and requirements

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

اشرح بالتفصيل المراحل المختلفة لدورة حياة الموظف المطبقة في تلك الوظيفة ( التعريف ، انواع ، الاهمية


Explain in detail the stages of HR-Life Cycle (definition, types , importance)


1 – التوظيف والاختيار :

1. Recruitment & Selection

الاستقطاب الجذب Attraction :

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Recruitment التوظيف من خلال الاعلان : ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

المقابلات …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


2 – الاعداد والتوجيةOn boarding Orientation :
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

هناك ثلاث مراحل :

1 – التهيئه والتوجيه

Orientation …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………2 – ادارة الاداء والتقييم

Performance Management – Evaluation …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3- التطوير والتدريب

Training and development …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


3 – ا لنقل والخروج ( ترك العمل : E

Exit & Transition

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….


اذكر المراحل الثلاث في الجدول الاتي مع تحديد الاهمية والمشاكل لكل مرحلة


Explain the importance and issues in each stage :

المشاكل / التحديات

Problems , Issues & Challenges

الاهمية

Importance

المرحلة

Stage

1 –

……………………………………..

………………………………………

………………………………………

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2-

……………………………………..

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3 –

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1 – ……………………………………

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2- …………………………………..

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3 –

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التوظيف والاختيار

1 –

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2-

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3 –

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1 – ……………………………………

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2- …………………………………..

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3 –

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الاعداد والتوجية

1 –

……………………………………

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2-

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3 –

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1 – ……………………………………

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2- …………………………………..

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3 –

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الخروج والانتقال


نقاط القوة والضعف لأهميه كل مرحلة


Strengths & Weakness of importance each stage

نقاط الضعف

نقاط القوة

المرحلة

1 –

……………………………………..

………………………………………

………………………………………

………………………………………

2-

……………………………………..

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3 –

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1 – ……………………………………

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2- …………………………………..

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3 –

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التوظيف والاختيار

1 –

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2-

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3 –

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1 – ……………………………………

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2- …………………………………..

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3 –

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الاعداد والتوجية

1 –

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2-

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3 –

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1 – ……………………………………

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2- …………………………………..

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3 –

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الخروج والانتقال

الملخص ( الاستنتاج ) Valid Conclusion :

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


الوثائق المطلوبة في كل مرحلة :


Required documents in each stage

الوثائق

المرحلة

1 – ……………………………………………….

2 – ………………………………………………

3 – ………………………………………………

4 – ………………………………………………

التوظيف والاختيار

1 – ……………………………………………….

2 – ………………………………………………

3 – ………………………………………………

4 – ………………………………………………

الاعداد والتوجية

1 – ……………………………………………….

2 – ………………………………………………

3 – ………………………………………………

4 – ………………………………………………

الخروج الانتقال


توصيات لتطويرالعمليات و الوثائق مع الشرح للوثيقه المقترحة :


Judgment and recommendations regarding the process and documents


يجب اقتراح تحسين يتعلق بالعميان واخر بالوثائق في كل مرحلة

توصيات وحلول

Recommendations for the process and documents

الحكم

Judgment

نقاط االضعف / Issues

المرحلة

1 –

……………………………………..

………………………………………

2-

……………………………………..

………………………………………

1 – ……………………………………

……………………………………

2- …………………………………..

…………………………………..

التوظيف والاختيار

1 –

……………………………………

……………………………………

2-

…………………………………..

…………………………………..

1 – ……………………………………

……………………………………

2- …………………………………..

…………………………………..

الاعداد والتوجية

النقل والخروج

توصيات لتطوير الوثائق :

1.

2.

3.

الملخص ( الاستنتاج )Valid Conclusion :

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


اعداد خطة لإدارة الأداء للوظيفة التي اخترتها وتطبيق تقنيات مختلفة لحل السلوكيات السلبية والتغلب على مشاكل الاحتفاظ بالموظفين من خلال الاتي :

Develop a performance management plan for your chosen job and applying different techniques to resolve both negative behaviors and overcome issues of staff retention by following the below :



1 – اختر وظيفة محددة من الوظائف الموجوده في الفندق 1. Choose specific role from hotel context

………………………………………………………………………..

2 – حدد ماهي مهام ، متطلبات والمهارات المطلوبه لهذه الوظيفة 2. Provide the duties and skills, requirements of the chosen role

3

اختر ثلاث مهارات تحتاج للتطوير من خلال اعداد خطة تحتوي على ( المهارة او المهمة التي تحتاج للتطوير المخرجات المطلوبة ، والاسلوب المستخدم ، الوقت المطلوب واخيرا الشخص المسؤول عن متابعة الإجراء ) من خلال الجدول الاتي :

Choose 3 performance gap/ skills and prepare the development plan that includes (improvement area, desired outcome, desired action, technique, planned time and who in charge).

المشكلة

(تحتاج لتطوير )

Skill gap

Improvement Area

Desired outcome

النتيجة المطلوبه

التقنية المطلوبة

Technique

مدة المخطط

Planned

Time

من المسؤول

Who in Charge

1.

2.

3.

Operations Management homework help

Process Improvement Project:

Describing your plan to improve a process or task in which you currently work or operate. This

plan must be presented with a problem statement and flowcharts. It should identify and explain

in detail the process, including graphical representations and flowcharts. This presentation will

be a coherent utilization of operation management and quality processes to quantify the

magnitude of anticipated improvement (e.g. cycle time reductions, inventory cost reductions).

Data depicting the results of the process improvement are required. You should be able to

produce data and present a data analysis that will be the basis for your recommendation. If data is

not available, you may build on an assumption basis and outline how such data could be

obtained, what the data might be expected to reveal, and how you would evaluate the success of

the improvement project. In either case, be certain you provide a detailed explanation of how you

arrived at your conclusions and recommendations. IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT YOU QUANTIFY

YOUR COST/BENEFIT ANALYSIS. 20-25 minutes in length. No more than 30 minutes. You

should also include a 2-3 page summary

Research Company – ‘Total Care’ Urgent Care Clinic (www.totalcare.us)

Research Topic – Decreasing patient wait time to increase patient numbers. We want to find a

way to make patient wait less so we can increase the number of patients visit per day

Project Outline:

• Company Profile

• Mission

• Strategy

• SWOT – (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats)

• Problem Identification (Problem Statement) ½ page

• Process Analysis
o Flowchart – Use proper symbols
o Data Analysis 1 page
o Narrative – Explain the process and data analysis

• Benchmark/s – compare with similar processes in other companies/organizations

• Recommendations – Includes a process improvement methodology (6 Sigma – DMAIC,
TQM, Lean, PDCA, etc) 2 pages

• New Proposed Process
o New Process Flow Chart – Use proper symbols
o Identified Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to monitor (3 minimum)

• Cost Benefit (Cost vs. Benefit Detailed)

• Conclusion ½ page

Operations Management homework help

Project


Analysis of an Emerging Technology Firm

Please find a technology firm recently listed in any U.S. stock market, and analyze its values and potentials. The firm you choose must be listed in any U.S. stock market such as NYSE and NASDAQ after January 1, 2020. This is NOT a group project. Please complete this project by yourself. Plagiarism leads to an immediate zero!

(a) The name and symbol ticker of the firm. Was it directly listed or listed via SPAC? The firm you choose can be in any technology fields such as information technology, biomedical technology, aerospace technology, etc.

(b) Explain the technology the firm offers and what this technology can do for clients.

(c) The strengths and weaknesses of the technology.

(d) Do you think the firm’s stock is currently overvalued, undervalued, or fair valued? Why?

(e) Do you think the firm’s revenues and profits will increase or decrease in 5 years? Why?

(f) Who is the current CEO of this firm? Use about 50 words to describe the CEO’s backgrounds.

(g) If you were the CEO of this firm, what would you do to improve its revenues and profitability?

(e) Excluding figures, data tables, and references, a minimum of 5 page analyses are required. You should use double-space, size 12 Times New Roman fonts in this report. You can cite other industrial report and academic research to support your analysis. If your report doesn’t meet the minimum page requirement, you will lose 10 points for the analysis shortage.

Please save your analysis into a Word document, and submit it to myLeo Online. Thank you!

Appendix: How to Find an Emerging Tech Firm from the U.S. Stock Market

(1) If you already have a firm in mind, you can analyze it. Make sure the firm is in technology industry (note: any technology), and it went public in the U.S. stock market after January 1, 2020. One purpose of this project is to encourage you to learn new knowledge. Thus, this time limit is set.

(2) If you don’t have a firm in mind, you can search the IPO database on sources such as Yahoo Finance, as shown below:

(2.1) Go to https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/calendar/ipo?from=2020-12-13&to=2020-12-19&day=2020-12-16

(2.2) I just choose IPO on 2020 12 16 as an example. You do not need to choose the same day. You can click the “Prev” and “Next” buttons to go through listed companies on each day. You can also set your own date in the Events Calendar to search newly listed companies, as shown below.

You can take a look at a few different days, and look for the companies that interest you. You can click the company’s symbol, then Yahoo Finance will give you all the fundamentals such as company’s business summaries, income statements, balance sheets, etc. for supporting your answers. As long as you cite the reference sources, the citation does not count as plagiarism.

BTW, it doesn’t hurt to browse a few different companies, as you will learn all kinds of amazing new technologies when you compare the companies. This is one important purpose of this project. Just make sure the company you choose is a tech firm listed in the U.S. stock market after January 1, 2020.

Operations Management homework help

181

Volume 16 Number 1, June 2017

Assessment of Prophetic Foods Consumption among
Lactating Mothers: Combining Quantitative &
Qualitative Approaches

Siti Munirah Abdul Basir
1
, Nor Azwani Mohd Shukri

1
, Radiah Abdul Ghani

2
, Muhammad Ibrahim

1
,Muhammad

Muzaffar Ali Khan Khattak
1
, Muhammad Nor Omar

3

1
Department of Nutrition Sciences, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, International Islamic University Ma-

laysia, Jalan Sultan Ahmad Shah, Bandar Indera Mahkota, 25200, Kuantan, Pahang,
2
Department of Biomedi-

cal Sciences, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia,
3
Department of

Biotechnology, Kulliyyah of Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia

ABSTRACT
Introduction: The phrase ‘Prophetic food and medicine’ reflects the words and actions of the Holy Prophet
Muhammad (PBUH) with the bearing of disease, treatment of disease, and care of patients. Among plants
mentioned in the Al-Quran, Al-Hadith and Islamic literature are dates, pomegranates, figs, olive and black
cumin seeds. These plants are widely used for medicinal purposes, as functional foods and industrial
products. However, there are limited studies found regarding their effect on human milk quality and
quantity. Thus, this paper aims to describe the methodology to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice of
prophetic foods consumption among lactating mothers in Kuantan, Pahang. Methodology: Pregnant Malay
mothers aged 18 to 40 years old, at a gestational duration of ≥ 32 weeks, are recruited. During the lactation
period, their dietary intake (specifically the consumption of prophetic foods) are assessed using a
quantitative method which is food frequency questionnaire. A subsample of these mothers is then
interviewed using semi-structured interview method on the prophetic food consumption. Quantitative and
qualitative data are analysed using SPSS and NVivo software, respectively. Result: Reports of positive effects
of prophetic food consumption on lactation experience namely improving human milk production is
anticipated from this study. In addition, it will provide a foundation for further exploration of the role of
prophetic food consumption in the lactation process. Conclusion: This research is at the forefront to provide
the data on potential practice and application of prophetic foods in positively influencing lactation
experience and quality of human milk.

KEYWORDS: prophetic food, lactation, dietary assessment

Siti Munirah Abdul Basir
Department of Nutrition Sciences,
Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences,
International Islamic University Malaysia,
Kuantan Campus.
Email: munirah.basir@live.iium.edu.my

INTRODUCTION

The phrase ‘Prophetic food and medicine’ reflects
the words and actions of the Holy Prophet
Muhammad (PBUH) with relation to disease,
treatment of disease, and patients’ care.

1
This also

includes His words on medical matters, medical
treatment practiced by others on the Prophet,
medical treatments practised by the Prophet on
himself and others, medical treatments observed by
the Prophet with no objections, medical procedures
that the Prophet heard or knew about and did not
prohibit, or medical practices which were so
common that the Prophet could not have failed to
know about them.

1
Narrated by Abu Huraira: The

Prophet said, “There is no disease that Allah has
created, except that He also has created its
treatment.” The specific remedies taught by the
Prophet (PBUH) are valid and useful. These,
however, may not be used today without
undertaking further empirical research because of

changes in the human and physical environments.

Among plants mentioned in the Al-Quran, Al-Hadith
and Islamic literature are dates, pomegranates, figs,
olives and black cumin seeds.

2
These plants are

widely used for medicinal purposes such as to treat
common colds, diabetes, and eczema, as functional
foods i.e. to improve milk production and improving
memory.

3-5
In addition, these plants are also utilised

in industrial products such as facial cleanser, acne
treatment, and supplementary products.

The World Health Organization (WHO) and United
Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) strongly advocate
exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months after
birth as the optimal way of feeding infants. This is
based on a review of evidence which demonstrated its
benefits on child health, nutritional, immunologic,
developmental, psychological, social, economic, and
environmental status, as well as, its positive
implications on maternal wellbeing.

6
In addition,

WHO is now targeting to increase the rate of exclusive
breastfeeding in the first six months up to at least 50%
by the year 2025.

7
The Malaysian government has

consequently adopted this recommendation which
encourages mothers to practice breastfeeding from
birth until six months and continue to breastfeed

Volume 16 Number 1, June 2017

182

for two years in its Malaysian Dietary Guidelines
(MDG).

8,9
The recommendation has been

strengthened as Key Message 1 in the recent MDG
2013.
However, breastfeeding is not without its
challenges. There are a number of reasons related
to the inability to continue with breastfeeding
among some new mothers. Among the common
causes of early termination of breastfeeding is the
perception of insufficient milk production by the
mother and/or insufficient milk intake by the
baby.

10,11
In addition, lack of information and

support has been reported to influence
breastfeeding cessation.

12,13
Other reasons found in

the literature include concern about infant’s
nutritional status, difficulties related to lactation
and milk-pumping effort, – baby’s inability to
suckle, fear of painful breasts and low breastfeeding
self-efficacy among mothers.

14-17

In relation to this, there are very limited studies
found on prophetic foods consumption and their
potential role in breastfeeding. Current review
found only one study that showed a positive
relationship between consumption of palm dates
and quantity of human milk.

3
In addition, there are

many claims of the benefits of prophetic foods
(including for breastfeeding) which have yet to be
proven scientifically. These gaps warrant
investigation. Thus, the main aim of this paper is to
describe the methodology used in the current study
to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of
prophetic foods consumption among lactating
mothers in Kuantan, Pahang.

METHODOLOGY
Setting and participants

Study participants are being recruited from areas
around Kuantan, Pahang. The recruitment is done
by online advertisement and direct recruitment at a
few health care settings. A total of 152 mothers are
targeted to be included in this study. The study size
is determined by using a single mean formula as
stated below:

n = [Z α/2 x σ]

2


= [1.96 x 0.3 / 0.05]

2

= 138.3 + 10% attrition

≈ 152
* Z α/2: 95% confidence interval
σ: standard deviation from literature
∆: precision

Inclusion Criteria

These include pregnant women aged between 18 to
40 years old, with singleton pregnancy at week 32
and onwards, are motivated to exclusively
breastfeed, and deliver a full-term baby at least at
37 weeks of gestation; or women of the mentioned
age, who are exclusively breastfeeding a baby aged
six months or younger.

Exclusion Criteria
These include pregnant women: with the diagnosis
of any pre-existing chronic diseases such as
diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases, with
any pregnancy complications such as hyperemesis
gravidarum, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and
gestational diabetes; who practice tandem nursing;
and who deliver a preterm baby (less than 37 weeks
of gestation).

During the study, data are obtained only for as
long as the mothers exclusively breastfeed their
babies during the six-month postnatal period. Each
procedure involved in this study is clearly explained
before obtaining the participants’ verbal and written
consents.Figure 1 illustrates the general
methodology of the study.

Variables

Data on socio-demographic characteristics,
obstetric history, smoking status, physical activity,
and any dietary intake of multivitamins and/
or galactagogue supplements, during the study,
are collected using an interviewer – administered
questionnaire.Compared to a self-administered
questionnaire, this method allows for questions
clarification, ensures completion of the
questionnaire, obtains higher response rate and has
higher control of the environment.

18
In addition,

breastfeeding record such as frequency of
breastfeeding, the duration of each breastfeeding,
and the number of wet diapers of the babies, are
also collected.

Quantitative Assessment
The quantitative assessment of the prophetic food
consumption is carried out by using a food
frequency questionnaire (FFQ). This contains a list
of foods and beverages, with sections to report the
frequency and quantity of foods/ beverages
consumed over a specified period.

19
The FFQ method

represents an individual’s ‘habitual’ intake.

Development of questionnaire
To date, there is no FFQ on prophetic foods
available in the literature. Hence, the FFQ used in
this study is newly developed through several steps.
Firstly, a list of foods mentioned in the Al-Quran,
Al-Hadith and Islamic literature is obtained through
literature review. Eight foods which are commonly
recognized and consumed by Malaysians are
included in the FFQ. These include palm date,
raisin, black seed (Habbatus Sauda), honey,
pomegranate, milk, fig, and olive. For each food,
the amount taken per day is recorded. Other than
that, the frequency of consumption is assessed on a
daily and weekly basis. This is to determine the
nutrients and total energy contribution from these
foods in the daily dietary intake of the participants.
In addition, the reasons for consumption of the
foods are also noted. This quantitative assessment
is carried out on the 30

th
and 90

th
, days of

postpartum.

183

Volume 16 Number 1, June 2017

Before commencement of the actual study, a pilot
study has been conducted to assess the
acceptability of the FFQ. A total of 10 participants
were randomly chosen to participate in the study.
Based on the pilot study, a new food (fenugreek) is
added to the list. Other than that, the item
‘amount taken per day’ is rephrased as ‘amount
taken per eating session’.

Qualitative assessment
A subsample of mothers who has completed the
quantitative assessment as explained earlier are
then interviewed using semi-structured interview
method. The objective of this is to further explore
the consumption of prophetic foods during the
lactation period. A qualitative study is chosen
because it would assist in understanding a person’s
interpretation and experience on a subject matter.
In this case, the intention is to investigate the
mothers’ knowledge, attitude and practice on
prophetic foods consumption during the exclusive
breastfeeding period. Knowledge can be defined as
the mothers’ understanding about prophetic foods
or prophetic diet. Attitude refers to their
perception about prophetic foods consumption such
as its perceived benefits or harm. Practice, on the
other hand, depicts the way the mothers
demonstrate their knowledge and attitude on
prophetic foods through their actions.

A semi-structured interview is a type of in-depth
interview which may consist of open- and close-
ended questions. It allows researchers to develop a
better understanding on the topic of interest.

20

Study participants are interviewed individually.
Generally, the questions asked during the interview
revolve around these topics:

-Understanding about prophetic foods
-Giving examples of prophetic foods
-Consumption of any prophetic foods during
breastfeeding period
-The reason for consuming the prophetic food(s), if
they do

The number of included participants in this
qualitative assessment is determined by the
saturation of information obtained. The interview is
recorded using a voice recorder and is transcribed
prior to analysis.

Statistical and qualitative analyses

The nutritional intake from prophetic foods is
estimated based on the Nutrient Composition of
Malaysian Foods database and U.S. Department of
Agriculture (USDA) Foods database. Association
between maternal intake of prophetic foods and
nutrient contents of breast milk is assessed by using
Pearson correlation. This is performed using IBM
SPSS Version 20.0 with confidence interval level set
at 95%.

For the qualitative analysis, NVivo analysis software
is used. All information and answers obtained from

the interview are recorded in this software. It
assists in organizing and analysing the qualitative
information obtained from the interview with the
participants. The content of the interviews will be
analysed thematically into knowledge, attitude and
practice codes. Once a pattern is identified, the
recruitment for the interview shall be ended.

Ethical Approval and Informed Consents

This study has been approved by the International
Islamic University Malaysia Research Ethics
Committee (IREC). Signed informed consent is
prepared in both English and Malay. Verbal and
written consents are obtained in the presence of a
witness after each procedure involved in this study
is clearly explained to the participants.

RESULT

Reports of the positive experience of prophetic food
consumption on lactation including improvement of
human milk production are anticipated from this
study. The researchers are hoping to learn about
mothers’ individual knowledge and perception of
prophetic foods consumption and its role during the
lactation period. In addition, the mothers’ attitude
regarding prophetic food consumption during
lactation will be analysed. We may also see
prophetic foods consumption being practiced among
lactating mothers from the FFQ. Other than that,
this study will provide a foundation for further
exploration of the role of prophetic food
consumption in the lactation process.

DISCUSSION

The objective of this study is to analyse the
knowledge, attitude, and practice of prophetic
foods consumption during the lactation period. In
order to achieve this, FFQ and qualitative
interviewing are included as our methods of study.

FFQ is relatively an inexpensive research tool used
for a dietary intake assessment. It can be
completed quickly and is able to assess current and
past diet. Also, it may be used to compare between
those with high and low intakes as it allows ranking
of individual’s food or nutrient intake.

21
Qualitative

interviewing, on the other hand, helps to examine
issues in detail and in depth. It may also reveal the
subtlety and complexity of research subject which
is often missed by quantitative inquiry.

22
According

to Onwuegbuzie and Leech (2005), combining both
quantitative and qualitative research methodologies
has their advantages.

23
For instance, quantitative

data would help to generalize the findings from
qualitative assessment. Other than that, by having
both methodologies, researchers would be able to
combine the macro and micro levels of a research
issue. The combination of qualitative and
quantitative methodologies would also be useful in
developing conceptual frameworks, validating
quantitative findings by referring to findings from
the qualitative study, and constructing indices from

Volume 16 Number 1, June 2017

184

Development of questionnaire

Pilot study of questionnaire

Review of questionnaire

Administration of questionnaire
to respondents

Semi-structured interview on a
subsample of respondents

Q
u
a
n
ti

ta
ti

v
e

A
s
s
e
s
s
m

e
n
t

Q

u
a
li
ta

ti
v
e

A
s
s
e
s
s
m

e
n
t

REFERENCES

1. Omar Hassan Kasule. Tibbn Al-Nabawi. Scibd.

Available at:

/TIBBN-AL-NABAWI (2007). Accessed 20 April
2016

2. Mushtaq A, Mir A. K, Sarfaraz K.M.,
Muhammad, Z., Muhammad A.K., Tamoor, H.
and Shazia. S. Useful medicinal flora enlisted
in Holy Quran and Al-Hadith. American-
Eurasian J. Agric. & Environ. Sci. 2009; 5: 126-
140

3. Sakka, A.E., Salama, M., and Salama, K. The
Effect of Fenugreek Herbal Tea and Palm Dates
on Breast Milk Production and Infant Weight.
Journal of Pediatric Sciences 2014; 6: e202

4. Sheikh B.Y. The role of prophetic medicine in
the management of diabetes mellitus: A review
of literature. Journal of Taibah University
Medical Sciences [online] 2016; available at:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtumed.2015.12.0
02. Accessed 18 April 2016

5. Ramadhan, M. The Nutritional Value,
Functional Properties and Nutraceutical
Applications of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L.):
An Overview. International Journal of Food
Science and Technology 2007; 42: 1208-1218.
doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.2006.01417.x

6. Kramer, M.S. and Kakuma, R. The optimal
duration of exclusive breastfeeding: a
systematic review. World Health Organization
2001. Available at:
http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/optimal
_duration_of_exc_bfeeding_review_eng.pdf.
Accessed 15 April 2016

7. World Health Organization (WHO):
Comprehensive Implementation Plan on
Maternal, Infant and Young Child Nutrition.
World Health Organization Publication [online]
2014. Available at:
http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/CI
P_document/en/. Accessed 25 April 2016

8. National Coordinating Committee on Food and
Nutrition (NCCFN): Malaysian Dietary Guidelines
for Children and Adolescents – Summary.
Ministry of Health Malaysia [online] 2013.
Available at:
http://www.moh.gov.my/images/gallery/Gari
spanduan/MDG%20Children%20and%20Adolesce
nts%20Summary.pdf. Accessed 25 April 2016

9. National Coordinating Committee on Food and
Nutrition (NCCFN). Malaysian Dietary Guidelines
– Key Message 12. Ministry of Health Malaysia
[online]. Available at:
http://www.moh.gov.my/english.php/pages/v
iew/536. Accessed 25 April 2016

10. Spencer, J.: Common Problems of
Breastfeeding and Weaning. In: UpToDate
[online]. Available at:
http://www.uptodate.com/contents/common-
problems-of-breastfeeding-and-weaning.
Accessed 29 March 2016

11. Wang, W., Lau, Y., Chow. A. and Chan, K.S.
Breast-feeding intention, initiation and

qualitative data that can be used to analyse
quantitative data.

24

In this study, the researchers are looking at the
topic of prophetic food consumption among
lactating mothers which has never been explored
previously. By applying both quantitative and
qualitative approaches, this shall ensure that
information are collected as extensively and
accurately as possible, and thus would lead to an
improved understanding of this topic. The FFQ shall
help us determine the quantitative details of
prophetic foods consumption among the lactating
mothers, whereas the interviewing shall provide us
with the qualitative insights, such as their reasons
for and opinions of it.

CONCLUSION

Since breastfeeding would confer its benefits until
beyond childhood, appropriate action can be taken
and intervention can be planned to optimize its
effectiveness. This research is at the forefront to
provide exploratory information on the potential
practice and application of prophetic foods to
positively influence lactation experience and quality
of human milk. Thus, a combination of quantitative
as well as qualitative assessments is the appropriate
method to ensure the credibility of the information
obtained.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

This study is funded by Research Initiative Grants of
International Islamic University Malaysia (RIGS)

Figure 1: General methodology of the study

185

Volume 16 Number 1, June 2017

duration among Hong Kong Chinese women: A
prospective longitudinal study. Midwifery 2014;
30: 678-687

12. Oakley, L.L., Henderson, J., Redshaw, M. &
Quigley, M.A. The role of support and other
factors in early breastfeeding cessation: an
analysis data from a maternity survey in
England. BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth 2014; 18:
88

13. Agunbiade, O.M. & Ogunleye, O.V. Constraints
to exclusive breastfeeding practice among
breastfeeding mothers in Southwest Nigeria:
implications for scaling up. International
Breastfeeding Journal 2012; 7:5

14. Brand, E., Kothari, C. & Stark, M.A. 2011.
Factors related to breastfeeding
discontinuation between hospital discharge and
2 weeks postpartum. The Journal of Perinatal
Education, 2011; 20: 36-44. doi: 10.189/1058-
1234.20.2.36

15. Odom, E.C., Li, R., Scanlon, K.S., Perrine, C.G.
& Grummer-Strawn, L. 2013. Reasons for
earlier than desired cessation of breastfeeding.
Pediatrics, 2013; 131: e726-e732. doi:
10.1542/peds.2012-1295

16. Küçükoğlu, S. & Gökçeoğlu, E. 2015. The
relationship between insufficient milk
perception and breastfeeding self-efficacy
among Turkish mothers. Global Health
Promotion 2015; 1-9. doi:
10.1177/1757975916635080

17. Brown. Q.R.L., Dodds, L., Legge, A., Bryanton,
J. & Semenic S. 2014. Factors influencing the
reasons why mothers stop breastfeeding.
Canadian Journal of Public Health 2014 105:
e179-e185.

18. World Health Organization (WHO). 2008.
Questionnaire design. Foodborne disease
outbreaks: Guidelines for investigation and
control [online]. Available at:
http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/f
oodborne_disease/Annex_4.pdf . Accessed 5
May 2016

19. University of Colorado Danver: Food Frequency
Questionnaires [online]. Available at:
http://www.ucdenver.edu/research/CCTSI/pro
grams-
services/ctrc/Nutrition/Documents/Food_Freq
uency_Questionnaires.pdf . Accessed 5 May
2016

20. Cohen, D. and Crabtree, B.: Qualitative
Research Guidelines Project [online]. Robert
Wood Johnson Foundation 2006. Available at:
http://www.qualres.org/HomeSemi-3629.html.
Accessed on 14 September 2016.

21. Australian Child & Adolescent Obesity Research
Network: Dietary intake assessment – Frequent
Food Questionnaire. The University of Sydney
[online]. Available at:
http://www.acaorn.org.au/streams/nutrition/
assessment-methods/ffq.php. Accessed 10
September 2016.

22. Anderson, C.: Presenting and evaluating
qualitative research [online]. Available at:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/73116

5_3. Accessed on 10 September 2016.
23. Onwuegbuzie, A.J. and Leech, N.L. 2005. On

becoming a pragmatic researcher: the
importance of combining quantitative and
qualitative research methodologies.
International Journal of Research Methodology
2005; 8, 375-387. doi:
10.1080/13645570500402447.

24. Madey, D. L. Some benefits of integrating
qualitative and quantitative methods in
program evaluation, with some illustrations.
Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis
1982; 4: 223–236.

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University Malaysia, Faculty of Medicine and its content may not be copied or emailed to
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However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use.

Operations Management homework help

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Industry 47 DECISION HISTORY — All Years Company F

Workforce Compensation & Training Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Compensation
and Training
of Production
Workers

Base Wage (% change)
Incentive Pay ($/pair)
Fringe Benefits ($/year)
Best Practices ($/worker)

Supervisory Staff (ratio of workers to supervisors)
Supervisory Compensation (% change)

NORTH AMERICA FACILITY
+1%

$1.00
$3,007

$600
40 to 1

0%

+1%
$1.00

$3,007
$600

40 to 1
0%

+1%
$1.00

$3,007
$600

40 to 1
0%

+1%
$1.00

$3,007
$600

40 to 1
0%

+1%
$0.50

$0
$0

45 to 1
0%

+1%
$0.50

$0
$0

45 to 1
0%

Compensation
and Training
of Production
Workers

Base Wage (% change)
Incentive Pay ($/pair)
Fringe Benefits ($/year)
Best Practices ($/worker)

Supervisory Staff (ratio of workers to supervisors)
Supervisory Compensation (% change)

EUROPE-AFRICA FACILITY
0%

$0.00
$0
$0

0 to 1
0%

0%
$0.00

$0
$0

0 to 1
0%

0%
$0.00

$0
$0

0 to 1
0%

0%
$0.00

$0
$0

0 to 1
0%

0%
$0.00

$0
$0

0 to 1
0%

0%
$0.00

$0
$0

0 to 1
0%

Compensation
and Training
of Production
Workers

Base Wage (% change)
Incentive Pay ($/pair)
Fringe Benefits ($/year)
Best Practices ($/worker)

Supervisory Staff (ratio of workers to supervisors)
Supervisory Compensation (% change)

ASIA-PACIFIC FACILITY
+1%

$0.50
$1,536

$400
40 to 1

0%

+1%
$0.50

$1,536
$400

40 to 1
0%

+1%
$0.50

$1,536
$400

40 to 1
0%

+1%
$0.50

$1,536
$400

40 to 1
0%

+1%
$0.50
$500

$7,500
45 to 1

+1%

+1%
$0.50
$500

$7,500
45 to 1

+1%

Compensation
and Training
of Production
Workers

Base Wage (% change)
Incentive Pay ($/pair)
Fringe Benefits ($/year)
Best Practices ($/worker)

Supervisory Staff (ratio of workers to supervisors)
Supervisory Compensation (% change)

LATIN AMERICA FACILITY
0%

$0.00
$0
$0

0 to 1
0%

0%
$0.00

$0
$0

50 to 1
0%

+1%
$0.25

$1,000
$200

50 to 1
0%

+1%
$0.25

$1,000
$200

50 to 1
0%

+1%
$0.50
$500

$7,500
45 to 1

+1%

+1%
$0.50
$500

$7,500
45 to 1

+1%

Branded Footwear Production Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Branded
Production
Specs

Superior Materials %
Number of Models / Styles
Styling/Features ($000/model)
TQM / 6-Sigma ($/pair)

Anticipated Y16 Materials
Prices ($ per pair)

Standard
Superior

Branded Pairs to be Manufactured (000s)

NORTH AMERICA FACILITY
32.00%

200
$10

$1.00
4,033
$6.00

$12.00

32.00%
200
$10

$1.00
4,800
$6.10

$12.50

32.00%
300
$10

$1.00
4,800
$6.22

$12.04

32.00%
300
$10

$1.00
4,800
$6.04

$13.28

32.00%
500
$20

$2.00
0

$6.17
$14.43

32.00%
500

$0
$2.00

0
$5.83

$13.32

Branded
Production
Specs

Superior Materials %
Number of Models / Styles
Styling/Features ($000/model)
TQM / 6-Sigma ($/pair)

Anticipated Y16 Materials
Prices ($ per pair)

Standard
Superior

Branded Pairs to be Manufactured (000s)

EUROPE-AFRICA FACILITY
0.00%

0
$0

$0.00
0

$6.00
$12.00

0.00%
0

$0
$0.00

0
$6.10

$12.50

0.00%
0

$0
$0.00

0
$6.22

$12.04

0.00%
0

$0
$0.00

0
$6.04

$13.28

0.00%
0

$0
$0.00

0
$6.17

$14.43

0.00%
0

$0
$0.00

0
$5.83

$13.32

Branded
Production
Specs

Superior Materials %
Number of Models / Styles
Styling/Features ($000/model)
TQM / 6-Sigma ($/pair)

Anticipated Y16 Materials
Prices ($ per pair)

Standard
Superior

Branded Pairs to be Manufactured (000s)

ASIA-Pacific FACILITY
54.00%

200
$10

$0.90
4,249
$6.00

$12.00

54.00%
200
$10

$0.90
4,800
$6.10

$12.50

54.00%
300
$10

$0.90
4,800
$6.22

$12.04

54.00%
300
$10

$0.90
4,800
$6.04

$13.28

24.00%
500
$20

$2.00
4,125
$6.17

$14.43

24.00%
500
$20

$2.00
8,675
$5.83

$13.32

Branded
Production
Specs

Superior Materials %
Number of Models / Styles
Styling/Features ($000/model)
TQM / 6-Sigma ($/pair)

Anticipated Y16 Materials
Prices ($ per pair)

Standard
Superior

Branded Pairs to be Manufactured (000s)

LATIN AMERICA FACILITY
0.00%

0
$0

$0.00
0

$6.00
$12.00

0.00%
0

$0
$0.00
6,000
$6.10

$12.50

0.00%
200

$8
$0.70
6,000
$6.22

$12.04

0.00%
200

$8
$0.70
6,000
$6.04

$13.28

16.00%
500
$24

$2.00
6,525
$6.17

$14.43

20.00%
500
$24

$2.00
9,450
$5.83

$13.32

Decision History Copyright © GLO-BUS Software, Inc.
Printed 15-Apr-22 at 11:27 AM — Page 1

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Industry 47 DECISION HISTORY — All Years Company F

Production Facilities Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Production
Equipment

Purchase of
Equipment

New (000s of pairs)
Refurb (000s of prs)

Sale of Equipment (000s of prs)
Production
Imprvmnt
Options

Option A (reject rate reduction)
Option B (setup cost reduction)
Option C (S/Q rating increase)
Option D (productivity increase)

Construction of Additional Space (000s of pairs)

NORTH AMERICA FACILITY
0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

5,000
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0

5,000
No
No
No
No

0

Production
Equipment

Purchase of
Equipment

New (000s of pairs)
Refurb (000s of prs)

Sale of Equipment (000s of prs)
Production
Imprvmnt
Options

Option A (reject rate reduction)
Option B (setup cost reduction)
Option C (S/Q rating increase)
Option D (productivity increase)

Construction of Additional Space (000s of pairs)

EUROPE-AFRICA FACILITY
0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

Production
Equipment

Purchase of
Equipment

New (000s of pairs)
Refurb (000s of prs)

Sale of Equipment (000s of prs)
Production
Imprvmnt
Options

Option A (reject rate reduction)
Option B (setup cost reduction)
Option C (S/Q rating increase)
Option D (productivity increase)

Construction of Additional Space (000s of pairs)

ASIA-PACIFIC FACILITY
0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

2,000
0
0

No
No

Yes
No

4,000

8,000
0
0

Yes
No
No
No

0

Production
Equipment

Purchase of
Equipment

New (000s of pairs)
Refurb (000s of prs)

Sale of Equipment (000s of prs)
Production
Imprvmnt
Options

Option A (reject rate reduction)
Option B (setup cost reduction)
Option C (S/Q rating increase)
Option D (productivity increase)

Construction of Additional Space (000s of pairs)

LATIN AMERICA FACILITY
0
0
0

No
No
No
No

5,000

5,000
0
0

No
No
No
No

5,000

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

0
0
0

No
No
No
No

0

3,000
0
0

No
No

Yes
No

0

2,000
0
0

Yes
No
No
No

0

Branded Distribution Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Pairs Shipped
from Facility
to (000s)

North America Warehouse
Europe-Africa Warehouse
Asia-Paific Warehouse
Latin America Warehouse

NORTH AMERICA FACILITY
2,421
1,330

0
0

2,421
1,330

718
0

2,421
1,330

718
0

2,421
1,330

718
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

Pairs Shipped
from Facility
to (000s)

North America Warehouse
Europe-Africa Warehouse
Asia-Paific Warehouse
Latin America Warehouse

EUROPE-AFRICA FACILITY
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

Pairs Shipped
from Facility
to (000s)

North America Warehouse
Europe-Africa Warehouse
Asia-Paific Warehouse
Latin America Warehouse

ASIA-PACIFIC FACILITY
0

730
1,545
1,545

495
730

1,545
1,545

495
730

1,545
1,545

495
730

1,545
1,545

0
0

3,572
0

0
1,912
5,800

0

Pairs Shipped
from Facility
to (000s)

North America Warehouse
Europe-Africa Warehouse
Asia-Paific Warehouse
Latin America Warehouse

LATIN AMERICA FACILITY
0
0
0
0

2,688
2,688

0
0

2,688
2,688

0
0

2,688
2,688

0
0

0
1,716

0
4,000

3,600
0
0

4,754

Decision History Copyright © GLO-BUS Software, Inc.
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Industry 47 DECISION HISTORY — All Years Company F

Inventory Clearance Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20
Percentage of Pairs
Cleared
(from prior-year inventory)

North America
Europe-Africa
Asia-Pacific
Latin America

0%
0%
0%
0%

0%
0%
0%
0%

0%
0%
0%
0%

0%
0%
0%
0%

0%
0%
0%
0%

0%
0%
0%
0%

Internet Marketing Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Internet
Marketing
Decisions

Retail Price ($ per pair)
Search Engine Ads ($000s)
Free Shipping

Competitive
Assumptions

Retail Price ($ per pair)
Search Engine Ads ($000s)
Free Shipping

NORTH AMERICA MARKET
$67.00
$5,000

No
$67.00
$5,000

None

$67.00
$5,000

No
$67.58
$4,771

Few

$67.00
$5,000

No
$69.58
$4,917

Few

$67.00
$5,000

No
$72.08
$4,917
Some

$56.00
$10,000

No
$72.50
$4,813
Some

$87.00
$10,000

No
$77.83
$5,583
Some

Internet
Marketing
Decisions

Retail Price ($ per pair)
Search Engine Ads ($000s)
Free Shipping

Competitive
Assumptions

Retail Price ($ per pair)
Search Engine Ads ($000s)
Free Shipping

EUROPE-AFRICA MARKET
$72.00
$4,500

No
$72.00
$4,500

None

$53.00
$4,500

No
$72.71
$4,375

Few

$53.00
$4,500

No
$72.58
$4,375

Few

$53.00
$4,500

No
$76.00
$4,542

Few

$63.00
$10,000

No
$76.79
$4,313

Few

$78.50
$10,000

No
$80.38
$5,167
Some

Internet
Marketing
Decisions

Retail Price ($ per pair)
Search Engine Ads ($000s)
Free Shipping

Competitive
Assumptions

Retail Price ($ per pair)
Search Engine Ads ($000s)
Free Shipping

ASIA-PACIFIC MARKET
$67.00
$4,000

No
$67.00
$4,000

None

$67.00
$4,000

No
$67.88
$3,958

Few

$67.00
$4,000

No
$67.96
$3,875

Few

$67.00
$4,000

No
$70.67
$4,000
Some

$84.00
$10,000

No
$72.00
$3,938
Some

$73.50
$10,000

No
$78.00
$4,958
Some

Internet
Marketing
Decisions

Retail Price ($ per pair)
Search Engine Ads ($000s)
Free Shipping

Competitive
Assumptions

Retail Price ($ per pair)
Search Engine Ads ($000s)
Free Shipping

LATIN AMERICA MARKET
$72.00
$4,000

No
$72.00
$4,000

None

$53.00
$4,000

No
$73.17
$3,958

Few

$53.00
$4,000

No
$72.75
$3,750

Few

$53.00
$4,000

No
$74.63
$3,833

Few

$87.00
$10,000

No
$75.33
$3,917

Few

$86.50
$10,000

No
$80.83
$4,917
Some

Decision History Copyright © GLO-BUS Software, Inc.
Printed 15-Apr-22 at 11:27 AM — Page 3

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Industry 47 DECISION HISTORY — All Years Company F

Wholesale Marketing Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Wholesale
Marketing
Decisions

Wholesale Price ($ per pair)
Brand Advertising ($000s)
Rebate Offer ($ per pair)
Delivery Time (weeks)
Retailer Support ($ per outlet)

Competitive
Assumptions

S/Q Rating
Model Availability
Wholesale Price ($ per pair)
Brand Advertising ($000s)
Rebate Offer ($ per pair)
Delivery Time (weeks)
Retailer Support ($ per outlet)

NORTH AMERICA MARKET
$48.00

$10,000
$5.00

3
$4,000

4.0★
200

$48.00
$10,000

$5.00
3.0

$4,000

$48.00
$10,000

$5.00
3

$4,000
4.4★
216

$48.38
$10,375

$5.00
3.0

$4,104

$48.00
$10,000

$5.00
3

$4,000
4.8★
218

$48.55
$11,042

$4.80
2.4

$4,125

$48.00
$10,000

$5.00
3

$4,000
5.3★
247

$50.63
$9,750
$4.70

2.3
$4,208

$40.00
$25,000

$5.00
2

$4,000
5.5★
268

$52.79
$10,208

$4.70
2.3

$4,188

$62.00
$25,000

$5.00
2

$4,000
5.4★
266

$54.40
$12,417

$4.80
2.3

$4,188

Wholesale
Marketing
Decisions

Wholesale Price ($ per pair)
Brand Advertising ($000s)
Rebate Offer ($ per pair)
Delivery Time (weeks)
Retailer Support ($ per outlet)

Competitive
Assumptions

S/Q Rating
Model Availability
Wholesale Price ($ per pair)
Brand Advertising ($000s)
Rebate Offer ($ per pair)
Delivery Time (weeks)
Retailer Support ($ per outlet)

EUROPE-AFRICA MARKET
$53.00
$9,000
$5.00

3
$4,000

4.0★
200

$53.00
$9,000
$5.00

3.0
$4,000

$53.00
$9,000
$5.00

3
$4,000

4.4★
215

$53.47
$9,042
$5.00

3.0
$4,104

$53.00
$9,000
$5.00

3
$4,000

4.7★
216

$53.63
$9,500
$4.80

2.5
$4,125

$53.00
$9,000
$5.00

3
$4,000

5.2★
244

$56.38
$8,542
$4.80

2.4
$4,229

$45.00
$25,000

$5.00
2

$4,000
5.4★
264

$56.88
$9,750
$4.80

2.3
$4,208

$56.00
$25,000

$5.00
2

$4,000
5.3★
259

$57.42
$11,458

$5.00
2.3

$4,083

Wholesale
Marketing
Decisions

Wholesale Price ($ per pair)
Brand Advertising ($000s)
Rebate Offer ($ per pair)
Delivery Time (weeks)
Retailer Support ($ per outlet)

Competitive
Assumptions

S/Q Rating
Model Availability
Wholesale Price ($ per pair)
Brand Advertising ($000s)
Rebate Offer ($ per pair)
Delivery Time (weeks)
Retailer Support ($ per outlet)

ASIA-PACIFIC MARKET
$48.00
$8,000
$5.00

3
$2,750

4.0★
200

$48.00
$8,000
$5.00

3.0
$2,750

$48.00
$8,000
$5.00

3
$2,750

4.4★
212

$48.59
$8,083
$5.00

3.0
$2,792

$48.00
$8,000
$5.00

3
$2,750

4.8★
225

$48.76
$8,208
$4.80

2.5
$2,813

$48.00
$8,000
$5.00

3
$2,750

5.3★
247

$51.42
$7,583
$4.80

2.7
$3,104

$60.00
$25,000

$5.00
2

$3,000
5.5★
266

$52.67
$8,000
$4.80

2.6
$3,104

$52.50
$25,000

$5.00
2

$3,000
5.7★
287

$55.08
$10,583

$4.80
2.6

$3,125

Wholesale
Marketing
Decisions

Wholesale Price ($ per pair)
Brand Advertising ($000s)
Rebate Offer ($ per pair)
Delivery Time (weeks)
Retailer Support ($ per outlet)

Competitive
Assumptions

S/Q Rating
Model Availability
Wholesale Price ($ per pair)
Brand Advertising ($000s)
Rebate Offer ($ per pair)
Delivery Time (weeks)
Retailer Support ($ per outlet)

LATIN AMERICA MARKET
$53.00
$7,500
$5.00

3
$2,750

4.0★
200

$53.00
$7,500
$5.00

3.0
$2,750

$53.00
$7,500
$5.00

3
$2,750

4.4★
212

$53.83
$7,833
$5.00

3.0
$2,833

$53.00
$7,500
$5.00

3
$2,750

4.8★
208

$54.00
$8,000
$4.80

2.6
$2,792

$53.00
$7,500
$5.00

3
$2,750

5.3★
248

$56.43
$6,625
$4.80

2.6
$3,083

$62.00
$25,000

$5.00
2

$3,000
5.5★
262

$56.76
$7,208
$4.90

2.5
$3,000

$62.00
$25,000

$5.00
2

$3,000
5.5★
275

$58.83
$9,708
$4.80

2.3
$2,938

Decision History Copyright © GLO-BUS Software, Inc.
Printed 15-Apr-22 at 11:27 AM — Page 4

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Industry 47 DECISION HISTORY — All Years Company F

Private-Label Production Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Private-Label
Specs

Superior Materials %
Number of Models / Styles
Styling/Features ($000/model)

Pairs to be
Produced &
Shipped to
(000s)

North America Warehouse
Europe-Africa Warehouse
Asia-Paific Warehouse
Latin America Warehouse

NORTH AMERICA FACILITY
16.00

6
$3

215
215

0
0

16.00
6

$3
0
0
0
0

16.00
6

$3
0
0
0
0

16.00
6

$3
0
0
0
0

16.00
6

$2
0
0
0
0

16.00
6

$0
0
0
0
0

Private-Label
Specs

Superior Materials %
Number of Models / Styles
Styling/Features ($000/model)

Pairs to be
Produced &
Shipped to
(000s)

North America Warehouse
Europe-Africa Warehouse
Asia-Paific Warehouse
Latin America Warehouse

EUROPE-AFRICA FACILITY
0.00

0
$0

0
0
0
0

0.00
0

$0
0
0
0
0

0.00
0

$0
0
0
0
0

0.00
0

$0
0
0
0
0

0.00
0

$0
0
0
0
0

0.00
0

$0
0
0
0
0

Private-Label
Specs

Superior Materials %
Number of Models / Styles
Styling/Features ($000/model)

Pairs to be
Produced &
Shipped to
(000s)

North America Warehouse
Europe-Africa Warehouse
Asia-Paific Warehouse
Latin America Warehouse

ASIA-PACIFIC FACILITY
26.00

12
$3

0
0

222
222

26.00
12
$3

0
0
0
0

26.00
12
$3

0
0
0
0

26.00
12
$3

0
0
0
0

24.00
28
$5

0
1,475
1,600

0

6.00
12
$5

0
1,575
1,750

0

Private-Label
Specs

Superior Materials %
Number of Models / Styles
Styling/Features ($000/model)

Pairs to be
Produced &
Shipped to
(000s)

North America Warehouse
Europe-Africa Warehouse
Asia-Paific Warehouse
Latin America Warehouse

LATIN AMERICA FACILITY
0.00

0
$0

0
0
0
0

0.00
0

$1
0
0
0
0

0.00
0

$1
0
0
0
0

0.00
0

$1
0
0
0
0

26.00
22
$5

1,475
0
0

1,600

8.00
12
$5

800
0
0

1,750

Private-Label Contract Offers Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Pairs Offered for Sale (000s)
Price Offer ($ per pair)
Incorporate Projected Outcomes

NORTH AMERICA MARKET
200

$32.00
Yes

0
$32.00

No

0
$32.00

No

0
$32.00

No

1,364
$38.00

Yes

746
$37.00

Yes

Pairs Offered for Sale (000s)
Price Offer ($ per pair)
Incorporate Projected Outcomes

EUROPE-AFRICA MARKET
200

$37.00
Yes

0
$37.00

No

0
$37.00

No

0
$37.00

No

1,350
$40.00

Yes

1,477
$38.00

Yes

Pairs Offered for Sale (000s)
Price Offer ($ per pair)
Incorporate Projected Outcomes

ASIA-PACIFIC MARKET
200

$32.00
Yes

0
$32.00

No

0
$32.00

No

0
$32.00

No

1,464
$38.00

Yes

1,642
$37.00

Yes

Pairs Offered for Sale (000s)
Price Offer ($ per pair)
Incorporate Projected Outcomes

LATIN AMERICA MARKET
200

$37.00
Yes

0
$37.00

No

0
$37.00

No

0
$37.00

No

1,480
$40.00

Yes

1,633
$38.00

Yes

Decision History Copyright © GLO-BUS Software, Inc.
Printed 15-Apr-22 at 11:27 AM — Page 5

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Industry 47 DECISION HISTORY — All Years Company F

Celebrity Endorsements Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20
Contract Offer
($000s)

Judy Judge
Kimmie Jimmel
Bud Birkenstock
Jose Montana
Samuelle Jackson
Bronko Mars
Steff Caraway
Jay XYZ
Nunchuck Norris
Roger Federation
Nick Shavan
Anderson Blooper
Mic Jagermeister
Jim Hardball
LaBron Game
Flint Westwood

Offer Priority Judy Judge
Kimmie Jimmel
Bud Birkenstock
Jose Montana
Samuelle Jackson
Bronko Mars
Steff Caraway
Jay XYZ
Nunchuck Norris
Roger Federation
Nick Shavan
Anderson Blooper
Mic Jagermeister
Jim Hardball
LaBron Game
Flint Westwood

Spending Cap on Contracts ($000s)

$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$500
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

$0

$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

$0

$0
$10,000

$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

$0

$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

$0

$2,501
$2,501

$0
$2,501

$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$2,501
$0

$2,501
$0

$2,501
$0

$2,501
1
2
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
5
0
6
0
7

$18,000

$0
$0

$3,501
$0
$0
$0
$0

$3,501
$3,501

$0
$3,501

$0
$3,501

$0
$3,501

$0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
4
0
3
0
5
0
6
0

$22,000

CSRC Initiatives Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20

Charitable
Contributions

Total $ (before taxes)
% of Pretax Profit

Improved Working
Conditions

Cafeteris/Child Care
Vent./Lighting/Safety

Recycled Boxing/Packaging
Energy Efficiency Initiatives

Ethics Training/Enforcement

Supplier Code of Conduct

No
$0
$0

0%
No
No
No
No

No
$0
$0

0%
No
No
No
No

No
$0
$0

0%
No
No
No
No

No
$0
$0

0%
No
No
No
No

Yes
$500

$0
0%
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes

No
$500

$0
0%
No

Yes
Yes
No

Finance and Cash Flow Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 14 Year 15 Year 16 Year 17 Year 18 Year 19 Year 20
Sources of
Additional
Cash

1-Year Loan
5-Year Loan

10-Year Loan
Stock Issue (000s of shares)

$0
$0
$0

0

$0
$0

$311
0

$0
$0
$0

0

$0
$0
$0

0

$0
$0
$0

5,000

$0
$0

$25,000
5,000

Uses for
Excess
Cash

Early Repayment of
Long-Term Loans
Dividend ($ per share)
Stock Repurchase (000s shrs)

None
None
$0.00

0

None
None
$0.00

0

None
None
$0.00

0

None
None
$0.00

0

None
None
$0.00

0

None
None
$0.00

0

Decision History Copyright © GLO-BUS Software, Inc.
Printed 15-Apr-22 at 11:27 AM — Page 6

Operations Management homework help



اصدارأحكام وتوصيات صحيحة حول كيفية تحسين عمليات الموارد البشرية والوثائق في كل مرحلة من مراحل دورة حياة الموارد البشرية من خلال :

Make valid judgements and recommendations on how HR process and documents at each stage of the HR life cycle can be improved through :


شرح مفصل لمراحل دورة حياة الموظف وذلك من خلال :

a. An examination to the different stages of the HR life cycle applied to that job by doing the following


تعريف دورة حياة الموظف : –


HR-Life Cycle’s Definition

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:…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


اختر دورا معينا من وظائف واشرح عنها ( المسؤوليات والمتطلبات )


موظف حجوزات ، موظف استقبال ، موظف تدبير منزلي ، مساعد شيف ، مقدم الطعام او اي وظيف من المستويات التي يبدأ بها طالب متخرج حديثا

( اختر واحد )

Choose on role (Reservation Employee, Receptionist, House Keeper, Assistant Chef & Waiter), then introduce this role responsibilities and requirements

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

اشرح بالتفصيل المراحل المختلفة لدورة حياة الموظف المطبقة في تلك الوظيفة ( التعريف ، انواع ، الاهمية


Explain in detail the stages of HR-Life Cycle (definition, types , importance)


1 – التوظيف والاختيار :

1. Recruitment & Selection

الاستقطاب الجذب Attraction :

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Recruitment التوظيف من خلال الاعلان : ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Interviews …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


2 – الاعداد والتوجيةOn boarding Orientation :
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هناك ثلاث مراحل :

There are three stages:

1 – التهيئه والتوجيه

Orientation …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………2 – ادارة الاداء والتقييم

Performance Management – Evaluation …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3- التطوير والتدريب

Training and development …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


3 – ا لنقل والخروج ( ترك العمل : E

Exit & Transition

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اذكر المراحل الثلاث في الجدول الاتي مع تحديد الاهمية والمشاكل لكل مرحلة


Explain the importance and issues in each stage :

المشاكل / التحديات

Problems , Issues & Challenges

الاهمية

Importance

المرحلة

Stage

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Recruitment and selection

التوظيف والاختيار

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الاعداد والتوجية

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Exit and transition

الخروج والانتقال


نقاط القوة والضعف لأهميه كل مرحلة


Strengths & Weakness of importance each stage

نقاط الضعف

نقاط القوة

المرحلة

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التوظيف والاختيار

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الاعداد والتوجية

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Exit and transition

الخروج والانتقال

الملخص ( الاستنتاج ) Valid Conclusion :

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الوثائق المطلوبة في كل مرحلة :


Required documents in each stage

Documents

Stage

1 – ……………………………………………….

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التوظيف والاختيار Recruitment and selection

1 – ……………………………………………….

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الاعداد والتوجية Preparation and direction

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الخروج الانتقال Exit and transition


توصيات لتطويرالعمليات و الوثائق مع الشرح للوثيقه المقترحة :


Judgment and recommendations regarding the process and documents


يجب اقتراح تحسين يتعلق بالعميان واخر بالوثائق في كل مرحلة

توصيات وحلول

Recommendations for the process and documents

الحكم

Judgment

نقاط االضعف / Issues

المرحلة

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1 –

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التوظيف والاختيار

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الاعداد والتوجية

النقل والخروج

Exit and transition

توصيات لتطوير الوثائقRecommendations for the development of documents

1.

2.

3.

الملخص ( الاستنتاج )Valid Conclusion :

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اعداد خطة لإدارة الأداء للوظيفة التي اخترتها وتطبيق تقنيات مختلفة لحل السلوكيات السلبية والتغلب على مشاكل الاحتفاظ بالموظفين من خلال الاتي :

Develop a performance management plan for your chosen job and applying different techniques to resolve both negative behaviors and overcome issues of staff retention by following the below :



1 – اختر وظيفة محددة من الوظائف الموجوده في الفندق 1. Choose specific role from hotel context

………………………………………………………………………..

2 – حدد ماهي مهام ، متطلبات والمهارات المطلوبه لهذه الوظيفة 2. Provide the duties and skills, requirements of the chosen role

3

اختر ثلاث مهارات تحتاج للتطوير من خلال اعداد خطة تحتوي على ( المهارة او المهمة التي تحتاج للتطوير المخرجات المطلوبة ، والاسلوب المستخدم ، الوقت المطلوب واخيرا الشخص المسؤول عن متابعة الإجراء ) من خلال الجدول الاتي :

Choose 3 performance gap/ skills and prepare the development plan that includes (improvement area, desired outcome, desired action, technique, planned time and who in charge).

المشكلة

(تحتاج لتطوير )

Skill gap

Improvement Area

Desired outcome

النتيجة المطلوبه

التقنية المطلوبة

Technique

مدة المخطط

Planned

Time

من المسؤول

Who in Charge

1.

2.

3.

Operations Management homework help

Orders

Row ID Order ID Order Date Ship Date Ship Mode Customer ID Customer Name Segment Country City State Postal Code Region Product ID Category Sub-Category Product Name Sales Quantity Discount Profit
1 CA-2016-152156 11/8/16 11/11/16 Second Class CG-12520 Claire Gute Consumer United States Henderson Kentucky 42420 South FUR-BO-10001798 Furniture Bookcases Bush Somerset Collection Bookcase 261.96 2 0 41.9136
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7 CA-2014-115812 6/9/14 6/14/14 Standard Class BH-11710 Brosina Hoffman Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90032 West OFF-AR-10002833 Office Supplies Art Newell 322 7.28 4 0 1.9656
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11 CA-2014-115812 6/9/14 6/14/14 Standard Class BH-11710 Brosina Hoffman Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90032 West FUR-TA-10001539 Furniture Tables Chromcraft Rectangular Conference Tables 1706.184 9 0.2 85.3092
12 CA-2014-115812 6/9/14 6/14/14 Standard Class BH-11710 Brosina Hoffman Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90032 West TEC-PH-10002033 Technology Phones Konftel 250 Conference phone – Charcoal black 911.424 4 0.2 68.3568
13 CA-2017-114412 4/15/17 4/20/17 Standard Class AA-10480 Andrew Allen Consumer United States Concord North Carolina 28027 South OFF-PA-10002365 Office Supplies Paper Xerox 1967 15.552 3 0.2 5.4432
14 CA-2016-161389 12/5/16 12/10/16 Standard Class IM-15070 Irene Maddox Consumer United States Seattle Washington 98103 West OFF-BI-10003656 Office Supplies Binders Fellowes PB200 Plastic Comb Binding Machine 407.976 3 0.2 132.5922
15 US-2015-118983 11/22/15 11/26/15 Standard Class HP-14815 Harold Pawlan Home Office United States Fort Worth Texas 76106 Central OFF-AP-10002311 Office Supplies Appliances Holmes Replacement Filter for HEPA Air Cleaner, Very Large Room, HEPA Filter 68.81 5 0.8 -123.858
16 US-2015-118983 11/22/15 11/26/15 Standard Class HP-14815 Harold Pawlan Home Office United States Fort Worth Texas 76106 Central OFF-BI-10000756 Office Supplies Binders Storex DuraTech Recycled Plastic Frosted Binders 2.544 3 0.8 -3.816
17 CA-2014-105893 11/11/14 11/18/14 Standard Class PK-19075 Pete Kriz Consumer United States Madison Wisconsin 53711 Central OFF-ST-10004186 Office Supplies Storage Stur-D-Stor Shelving, Vertical 5-Shelf: 72″H x 36″W x 18 1/2″D 665.88 6 0 13.3176
18 CA-2014-167164 5/13/14 5/15/14 Second Class AG-10270 Alejandro Grove Consumer United States West Jordan Utah 84084 West OFF-ST-10000107 Office Supplies Storage Fellowes Super Stor/Drawer 55.5 2 0 9.99
19 CA-2014-143336 8/27/14 9/1/14 Second Class ZD-21925 Zuschuss Donatelli Consumer United States San Francisco California 94109 West OFF-AR-10003056 Office Supplies Art Newell 341 8.56 2 0 2.4824
20 CA-2014-143336 8/27/14 9/1/14 Second Class ZD-21925 Zuschuss Donatelli Consumer United States San Francisco California 94109 West TEC-PH-10001949 Technology Phones Cisco SPA 501G IP Phone 213.48 3 0.2 16.011
21 CA-2014-143336 8/27/14 9/1/14 Second Class ZD-21925 Zuschuss Donatelli Consumer United States San Francisco California 94109 West OFF-BI-10002215 Office Supplies Binders Wilson Jones Hanging View Binder, White, 1″ 22.72 4 0.2 7.384
22 CA-2016-137330 12/9/16 12/13/16 Standard Class KB-16585 Ken Black Corporate United States Fremont Nebraska 68025 Central OFF-AR-10000246 Office Supplies Art Newell 318 19.46 7 0 5.0596
23 CA-2016-137330 12/9/16 12/13/16 Standard Class KB-16585 Ken Black Corporate United States Fremont Nebraska 68025 Central OFF-AP-10001492 Office Supplies Appliances Acco Six-Outlet Power Strip, 4′ Cord Length 60.34 7 0 15.6884
24 US-2017-156909 7/16/17 7/18/17 Second Class SF-20065 Sandra Flanagan Consumer United States Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19140 East FUR-CH-10002774 Furniture Chairs Global Deluxe Stacking Chair, Gray 71.372 2 0.3 -1.0196
25 CA-2015-106320 9/25/15 9/30/15 Standard Class EB-13870 Emily Burns Consumer United States Orem Utah 84057 West FUR-TA-10000577 Furniture Tables Bretford CR4500 Series Slim Rectangular Table 1044.63 3 0 240.2649
26 CA-2016-121755 1/16/16 1/20/16 Second Class EH-13945 Eric Hoffmann Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90049 West OFF-BI-10001634 Office Supplies Binders Wilson Jones Active Use Binders 11.648 2 0.2 4.2224
27 CA-2016-121755 1/16/16 1/20/16 Second Class EH-13945 Eric Hoffmann Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90049 West TEC-AC-10003027 Technology Accessories Imation 8GB Mini TravelDrive USB 2.0 Flash Drive 90.57 3 0 11.7741
28 US-2015-150630 9/17/15 9/21/15 Standard Class TB-21520 Tracy Blumstein Consumer United States Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19140 East FUR-BO-10004834 Furniture Bookcases Riverside Palais Royal Lawyers Bookcase, Royale Cherry Finish 3083.43 7 0.5 -1665.0522
29 US-2015-150630 9/17/15 9/21/15 Standard Class TB-21520 Tracy Blumstein Consumer United States Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19140 East OFF-BI-10000474 Office Supplies Binders Avery Recycled Flexi-View Covers for Binding Systems 9.618 2 0.7 -7.0532
30 US-2015-150630 9/17/15 9/21/15 Standard Class TB-21520 Tracy Blumstein Consumer United States Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19140 East FUR-FU-10004848 Furniture Furnishings Howard Miller 13-3/4″ Diameter Brushed Chrome Round Wall Clock 124.2 3 0.2 15.525
31 US-2015-150630 9/17/15 9/21/15 Standard Class TB-21520 Tracy Blumstein Consumer United States Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19140 East OFF-EN-10001509 Office Supplies Envelopes Poly String Tie Envelopes 3.264 2 0.2 1.1016
32 US-2015-150630 9/17/15 9/21/15 Standard Class TB-21520 Tracy Blumstein Consumer United States Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19140 East OFF-AR-10004042 Office Supplies Art BOSTON Model 1800 Electric Pencil Sharpeners, Putty/Woodgrain 86.304 6 0.2 9.7092
33 US-2015-150630 9/17/15 9/21/15 Standard Class TB-21520 Tracy Blumstein Consumer United States Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19140 East OFF-BI-10001525 Office Supplies Binders Acco Pressboard Covers with Storage Hooks, 14 7/8″ x 11″, Executive Red 6.858 6 0.7 -5.715
34 US-2015-150630 9/17/15 9/21/15 Standard Class TB-21520 Tracy Blumstein Consumer United States Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19140 East OFF-AR-10001683 Office Supplies Art Lumber Crayons 15.76 2 0.2 3.546
35 CA-2017-107727 10/19/17 10/23/17 Second Class MA-17560 Matt Abelman Home Office United States Houston Texas 77095 Central OFF-PA-10000249 Office Supplies Paper Easy-staple paper 29.472 3 0.2 9.9468
36 CA-2016-117590 12/8/16 12/10/16 First Class GH-14485 Gene Hale Corporate United States Richardson Texas 75080 Central TEC-PH-10004977 Technology Phones GE 30524EE4 1097.544 7 0.2 123.4737
37 CA-2016-117590 12/8/16 12/10/16 First Class GH-14485 Gene Hale Corporate United States Richardson Texas 75080 Central FUR-FU-10003664 Furniture Furnishings Electrix Architect’s Clamp-On Swing Arm Lamp, Black 190.92 5 0.6 -147.963
38 CA-2015-117415 12/27/15 12/31/15 Standard Class SN-20710 Steve Nguyen Home Office United States Houston Texas 77041 Central OFF-EN-10002986 Office Supplies Envelopes #10-4 1/8″ x 9 1/2″ Premium Diagonal Seam Envelopes 113.328 9 0.2 35.415
39 CA-2015-117415 12/27/15 12/31/15 Standard Class SN-20710 Steve Nguyen Home Office United States Houston Texas 77041 Central FUR-BO-10002545 Furniture Bookcases Atlantic Metals Mobile 3-Shelf Bookcases, Custom Colors 532.3992 3 0.32 -46.9764
40 CA-2015-117415 12/27/15 12/31/15 Standard Class SN-20710 Steve Nguyen Home Office United States Houston Texas 77041 Central FUR-CH-10004218 Furniture Chairs Global Fabric Manager’s Chair, Dark Gray 212.058 3 0.3 -15.147
41 CA-2015-117415 12/27/15 12/31/15 Standard Class SN-20710 Steve Nguyen Home Office United States Houston Texas 77041 Central TEC-PH-10000486 Technology Phones Plantronics HL10 Handset Lifter 371.168 4 0.2 41.7564
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44 CA-2017-139619 9/19/17 9/23/17 Standard Class ES-14080 Erin Smith Corporate United States Melbourne Florida 32935 South OFF-ST-10003282 Office Supplies Storage Advantus 10-Drawer Portable Organizer, Chrome Metal Frame, Smoke Drawers 95.616 2 0.2 9.5616
45 CA-2016-118255 3/11/16 3/13/16 First Class ON-18715 Odella Nelson Corporate United States Eagan Minnesota 55122 Central TEC-AC-10000171 Technology Accessories Verbatim 25 GB 6x Blu-ray Single Layer Recordable Disc, 25/Pack 45.98 2 0 19.7714
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48 CA-2016-169194 6/20/16 6/25/16 Standard Class LH-16900 Lena Hernandez Consumer United States Dover Delaware 19901 East TEC-AC-10002167 Technology Accessories Imation 8gb Micro Traveldrive Usb 2.0 Flash Drive 45 3 0 4.95
49 CA-2016-169194 6/20/16 6/25/16 Standard Class LH-16900 Lena Hernandez Consumer United States Dover Delaware 19901 East TEC-PH-10003988 Technology Phones LF Elite 3D Dazzle Designer Hard Case Cover, Lf Stylus Pen and Wiper For Apple Iphone 5c Mini Lite 21.8 2 0 6.104
50 CA-2015-115742 4/18/15 4/22/15 Standard Class DP-13000 Darren Powers Consumer United States New Albany Indiana 47150 Central OFF-BI-10004410 Office Supplies Binders C-Line Peel & Stick Add-On Filing Pockets, 8-3/4 x 5-1/8, 10/Pack 38.22 6 0 17.9634
51 CA-2015-115742 4/18/15 4/22/15 Standard Class DP-13000 Darren Powers Consumer United States New Albany Indiana 47150 Central OFF-LA-10002762 Office Supplies Labels Avery 485 75.18 6 0 35.3346
52 CA-2015-115742 4/18/15 4/22/15 Standard Class DP-13000 Darren Powers Consumer United States New Albany Indiana 47150 Central FUR-FU-10001706 Furniture Furnishings Longer-Life Soft White Bulbs 6.16 2 0 2.9568
53 CA-2015-115742 4/18/15 4/22/15 Standard Class DP-13000 Darren Powers Consumer United States New Albany Indiana 47150 Central FUR-CH-10003061 Furniture Chairs Global Leather Task Chair, Black 89.99 1 0 17.0981
54 CA-2016-105816 12/11/16 12/17/16 Standard Class JM-15265 Janet Molinari Corporate United States New York City New York 10024 East OFF-FA-10000304 Office Supplies Fasteners Advantus Push Pins 15.26 7 0 6.2566
55 CA-2016-105816 12/11/16 12/17/16 Standard Class JM-15265 Janet Molinari Corporate United States New York City New York 10024 East TEC-PH-10002447 Technology Phones AT&T CL83451 4-Handset Telephone 1029.95 5 0 298.6855
56 CA-2016-111682 6/17/16 6/18/16 First Class TB-21055 Ted Butterfield Consumer United States Troy New York 12180 East OFF-ST-10000604 Office Supplies Storage Home/Office Personal File Carts 208.56 6 0 52.14
57 CA-2016-111682 6/17/16 6/18/16 First Class TB-21055 Ted Butterfield Consumer United States Troy New York 12180 East OFF-PA-10001569 Office Supplies Paper Xerox 232 32.4 5 0 15.552
58 CA-2016-111682 6/17/16 6/18/16 First Class TB-21055 Ted Butterfield Consumer United States Troy New York 12180 East FUR-CH-10003968 Furniture Chairs Novimex Turbo Task Chair 319.41 5 0.1 7.098
59 CA-2016-111682 6/17/16 6/18/16 First Class TB-21055 Ted Butterfield Consumer United States Troy New York 12180 East OFF-PA-10000587 Office Supplies Paper Array Parchment Paper, Assorted Colors 14.56 2 0 6.9888
60 CA-2016-111682 6/17/16 6/18/16 First Class TB-21055 Ted Butterfield Consumer United States Troy New York 12180 East TEC-AC-10002167 Technology Accessories Imation 8gb Micro Traveldrive Usb 2.0 Flash Drive 30 2 0 3.3
61 CA-2016-111682 6/17/16 6/18/16 First Class TB-21055 Ted Butterfield Consumer United States Troy New York 12180 East OFF-BI-10001460 Office Supplies Binders Plastic Binding Combs 48.48 4 0.2 16.362
62 CA-2016-111682 6/17/16 6/18/16 First Class TB-21055 Ted Butterfield Consumer United States Troy New York 12180 East OFF-AR-10001868 Office Supplies Art Prang Dustless Chalk Sticks 1.68 1 0 0.84
63 CA-2015-135545 11/24/15 11/30/15 Standard Class KM-16720 Kunst Miller Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90004 West TEC-AC-10004633 Technology Accessories Verbatim 25 GB 6x Blu-ray Single Layer Recordable Disc, 3/Pack 13.98 2 0 6.1512
64 CA-2015-135545 11/24/15 11/30/15 Standard Class KM-16720 Kunst Miller Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90004 West OFF-BI-10001078 Office Supplies Binders Acco PRESSTEX Data Binder with Storage Hooks, Dark Blue, 14 7/8″ X 11″ 25.824 6 0.2 9.3612
65 CA-2015-135545 11/24/15 11/30/15 Standard Class KM-16720 Kunst Miller Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90004 West OFF-PA-10003892 Office Supplies Paper Xerox 1943 146.73 3 0 68.9631
66 CA-2015-135545 11/24/15 11/30/15 Standard Class KM-16720 Kunst Miller Consumer United States Los Angeles California 90004 West FUR-FU-10000397 Furniture Furnishings Luxo Economy Swing Arm Lamp 79.76 4 0 22.3328
67 US-2015-164175 4/30/15 5/5/15 Standard Class PS-18970 Paul Stevenson Home Office United States Chicago Illinois 60610 Central FUR-CH-10001146 Furniture Chairs Global Value Mid-Back Manager’s Chair, Gray 213.115 5 0.3 -15.2225
68 CA-2014-106376 12/5/14 12/10/14 Standard Class BS-11590 Brendan Sweed Corporate United States Gilbert Arizona 85234 West OFF-AR-10002671 Office Supplies Art Hunt BOSTON Model 1606 High-Volume Electric Pencil Sharpener, Beige 1113.024 8 0.2 111.3024
69 CA-2014-106376 12/5/14 12/10/14 Standard Class BS-11590 Brendan Sweed Corporate United States Gilbert Arizona 85234 West TEC-PH-10002726 Technology Phones netTALK DUO VoIP Telephone Service 167.968 4 0.2 62.988
70 CA-2016-119823 6/4/16 6/6/16 First Class KD-16270 Karen Daniels Consumer United States Springfield Virginia 22153 South OFF-PA-10000482 Office Supplies Paper Snap-A-Way Black Print Carbonless Ruled Speed Letter, Triplicate 75.88 2 0 35.6636
71 CA-2016-106075 9/18/16 9/23/16 Standard Class HM-14980 Henry MacAllister Consumer United States New York City New York 10009 East OFF-BI-10004654 Office Supplies Binders Avery Binding System Hidden Tab Executive Style Index Sets 4.616 1 0.2 1.731
72 CA-2017-114440 9/14/17 9/17/17 Second Class TB-21520 Tracy Blumstein Consumer United States Jackson Michigan 49201 Central OFF-PA-10004675 Office Supplies Paper Telephone Message Books with Fax/Mobile Section, 5 1/2″ x 3 3/16″ 19.05 3 0 8.763
73 US-2015-134026 4/26/15 5/2/15 Standard Class JE-15745 Joel Eaton Consumer United States Memphis Tennessee 38109 South FUR-CH-10000513 Furniture Chairs High-Back Leather Manager’s Chair 831.936 8 0.2 -114.3912
74 US-2015-134026 4/26/15 5/2/15 Standard Class JE-15745 Joel Eaton Consumer United States Memphis Tennessee 38109 South FUR-FU-10003708 Furniture Furnishings Tenex Traditional Chairmats for Medium Pile Carpet, Standard Lip, 36″ x 48″ 97.04 2 0.2 1.213
75 US-2015-134026 4/26/15 5/2/15 Standard Class JE-15745 Joel Eaton Consumer United States Memphis Tennessee 38109 South OFF-ST-10004123 Office Supplies Storage Safco Industrial Wire Shelving System 72.784 1 0.2 -18.196
76 US-2017-118038 12/9/17 12/11/17 First Class KB-16600 Ken Brennan Corporate United States Houston Texas 77041 Central OFF-BI-10004182 Office

Operations Management homework help



Unit VII Case Study


Instructions

In this unit, you will complete the case study of the company that you chose in Unit II and have been researching throughout the course. Respond to the four writing prompts below. Your responses must include information from academic and scholarly research, including at least two resources from the CSU Online Library and at least two other online sources.

1. Create a case study summary of the company you have chosen, including a general overview of the company, its external environment, and a list of its current strategies and objectives.

2. If the company continues with its present strategies and objectives, where will it be in five years?

3. If you were the CEO of the company, what strategies would you recommend, and why?

4. Describe the competitive strategies used by the company’s main competitors. Which of these strategies are the most effective? How can your company combat these strategies? Support your answers.

If you paraphrase, quote, or use ideas from any source, you should cite your sources using APA guidelines. Your case study should be at least three pages in length, excluding a cover page and references page. Please contact your instructor if you have any questions, or contact the CSU Success Center should you need more support.

Resources

The following resource(s) may help you with this assignment.


Operations Management homework help

Ethics and Integrity in Research:

Research the various issues and concerns related to conducting research and prepare a final paper (no less than 1200 words) on why Ethics and Integrity in research is critical.  

Paper must identify and provide point and counter points on the types and levels of review (e.g., level 0, non-critical) and what steps must a researcher adopt to comply with CFR 46 standards.

1. Additional Resources:

· View the video, The Belmont Report (Part One: Basic Ethical Principles) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86zWBjDaXPk [5:44]

· View the video, The Belmont Report (Part Two: Applying the Principles) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIafASIIU70 [5:22]

· View the video, “Belmont Report Educational Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7sfIA1dIGQ [9:10]

Operations Management homework help

MGT 4337: Business Policy and Decision Making

Decision Log Journal Guidelines and Rubric

Overview
After completing each simulation with your team, you will individually document in a decision log the reasoning behind your company’s strategy
by explaining why you and your co-manager(s) chose to make the decisions and changes that you did in this module’s simulations.

You will submit a journal entry for each simulation (two per module, in Modules 2–6), totalling ten entries. However, individual entries will not be
graded in each module. Instead, the Decision Log Journal will be assessed as a whole after the completion of all the required simulations in
Module 6.

Note: ​If your company scores poorly in the industry, an exemplary Decision Log may replace your Business Strategy Game Industry Score up to
a maximum of 90%.

Prompt
For each Decision Log Journal Entry, be sure to complete the following:

1. First, for each journal entry, reflect on how you think the decisions for the year went in about one or two paragraphs. Specifically, address
the following:

a. Describe the major changes your company made
b. Explain why your company chose to make the decisions it did
c. Describe the outcomes of the changes or decisions your company made

2. Then download and save a copy of this document for each entry so you can edit the Strategy Decision Tracking Table on page 2 to track

your decisions for each round and explain how each decision fits with your company’s strategy. Be sure to include a detailed description
of the decisions you track and a thorough explanation of how they fit into your overall strategy.

For Example:​ One bullet point under a given region and market segment might read as follows: “Increased the percentage of superior
materials used to 70%. A differentiation strategy means having higher-quality shoes, so we believed increasing the percentage of
superior materials would be the best route to take.” This example identifies a major decision made during the simulation round and
explains how it fits in this company’s differentiation strategy.

To complete your journal entry for each decision year, you must attach a saved, completed copy of the Strategy Decisions Tracking
Table for that year’s decisions. It is recommended that you keep a personal copy of each year’s saved table under original file names as
a backup.

1

MGT 4337: Business Policy and Decision Making

Strategy Decision Tracking Table
*You must attach a copy of this completed table for each Decision Year Log Entry

Region Wholesale Internet Private Label

North America

Europe-Africa

Asia-Pacific

Latin America

2

MGT 4337: Business Policy and Decision Making

Rubric
Guidelines for Submission:​ Each journal entry should be about one or two paragraphs in length and include an attached copy of the completed
Strategy Decisions Tracking Table.

Instructor Feedback:​ This activity uses an integrated rubric in Blackboard. Students can view instructor feedback in the Grade Center.

Critical
Elements

Exemplary ​(100%) Proficient (85%) Needs Improvement (55%) Not Evident (0%) Value
%

Decision
Year 11

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

Decision
Year 12

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

3

MGT 4337: Business Policy and Decision Making

Decision
Year 13

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

Decision
Year 14

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

Decision
Year 15

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

4

MGT 4337: Business Policy and Decision Making

Decision
Year 16

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

Decision
Year 17

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

Decision
Year 18

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

5

MGT 4337: Business Policy and Decision Making

Decision
Year 19

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

Decision
Year 20

Demonstrates a sophisticated knowledge of
business policy and decision making through
the explanation of the outcomes of specific
major business changes or decisions, and
through the explanation of how each decision
aligned with company strategies. Submission
is also free of errors related to citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization
and is presented in a professional and
easy-to-read format.

Clearly identifies major business
changes or decisions, explaining
why each decision was made and
what the outcomes were. Also
explains how each decision fits
into the company’s strategy.
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization.

Identifies changes or decisions but
may not clearly explain why they
were made, what the outcomes
were, or why each decision fits into
the company’s strategy. Submission
may have major errors related to
citations, grammar, spelling, syntax,
or organization that negatively
impact readability and articulation of
main ideas.

Did not submit
journal entry.

10

Total

100 %

6

Operations Management homework help

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

DLA-HUNTSVILLE
DLA-AVIATION, BLDG 5201 Martin Road 2nd Floor

Redstone Arsenal, AL. 35898

UNOFFICIAL USE ONLY

FOUO

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY HUNTSVILLE (DLA)

PROPOSED TRAINING DEPARTMENT

SUBMITTED TO:

DLA-Aviation Huntsville Management

PREPARED BY:

Christopher Butler, Contract Specialist

DLA-Aviation Huntsville

Prepared on: 06/21/2021

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

DLA-HUNTSVILLE
DLA-AVIATION, BLDG 5201 Martin Road 2nd Floor

Redstone Arsenal, AL. 35898

UNOFFICIAL USE ONLY

FOUO

Date: June 08, 2021

To: DLA Aviation Huntsville Management Team

SUBJECT: Proposed Training Department

Dear Leadership Team,

While working at DLA Aviation for the past five years, turnover of employees has become

routine due to reasons such as retirement, promotion, or even to try something new. Attrition

leads to new hires at DLA. A proper foundation is a key to personal success and overall

organizational success in the complex career field of contracting. When it comes to supporting

the warfighter, who is protecting all our freedoms, organizational success depends upon

efficiency and a well-trained workforce.

The enclosed proposal highlights the benefits of adding a training department for all new hires to

the organization and the Federal Government. The proposed training department will lay the

proper foundation of firm-fixed pricing contracting. Additionally, the training department will

provide training to the whole organization every week to help maintain DLA Uniform

Workforce Initiative for Acquisition (DUWIA) certification while keeping the workforce

prepared for the ever-changing contracting field. Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Should you have any questions concerning this proposal, please contact Christopher Butler,

Contract Specialist, via email at christopher.butler@dla.mil.

Sincerely,

Christopher Butler

Christopher Butler

Contract Specialist

DLA Aviation Huntsville

Team Blackhawk

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

DLA-HUNTSVILLE
DLA-AVIATION, BLDG 5201 Martin Road 2nd Floor

Redstone Arsenal, AL. 35898

UNOFFICIAL USE ONLY

FOUO

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Letter of Proposal……………………………………………………………………………. Pg. 1

Table of Contents………………………………………………………………………………Pg. 2

Executive Summary……………………………………………………………………………Pg.3

Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………… Pg.4

Background, Problem, and Purpose……………………………………………………………Pg.4

Proposal, Plan, and Schedule………………………………………………………………… Pg.5

Staffing and Budget……………………………………………………………………………Pg.5

Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………. Pg.6

References…………………………………………………………………………………….Pg.7

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

DLA-HUNTSVILLE
DLA-AVIATION, BLDG 5201 Martin Road 2nd Floor

Redstone Arsenal, AL. 35898

UNOFFICIAL USE ONLY

FOUO

Executive Summary

This proposal outlines the need for DLA Aviation Huntsville to implement a training department.

The training department will be highly beneficial to the originations and its ability to carry on

with the mission of supporting the warfighter, while upholding the morale of the team and

improving employee retention. Implementing a training department will give new employees to

DLA and the Federal Government a solid foundation in firm-fixed-price contracting. At the same

time, it prepares the organization to be in a proactive, not reactive mindset. Fifty-five percent of

individuals in the contracting field are within five years of retiring from service. The acquisition

process at DLA Huntsville is drastically different from other DLA organizations and more in

debt due to the types of products procured. Additionally, new employees are required to request

access to, and become proficient in and familiar with multiple systems to successfully perform

the duties assigned.

Without proper training and introduction to the world of spare part acquisitions, the entire

process can be daunting and complicated. Fifty-three percent of the DLA Huntsville new hires

are from non-procurement, private sector backgrounds. These new employees require organized

training to ensure success for themselves and the organization. The proposed training department

would utilize two existing employees, on a one-year rotational basis, which would require no

additional funding. DLA trainers would be responsible for the following:

• Retirement and benefits training (401K, TSP)

• Mandatory training completed and keeping them up to date (depending on experience)

• Continuous learning points training given to the whole organization 40 weeks per year

• Training on the acquisition process using the 180-day gated acquisition process

• Training on computer systems needed to complete procurements

• Overview training of the pre and post-award processes used at DLA Huntsville

The institution of an internal DLA training program would benefit all new employees to DLA and

Government contracting while providing a stable foundation and knowledge base to become an

effective, efficient employee contributing to supporting the warfighter. Additionally, the training

department would put DLA Huntsville at the forefront for preparing for the rising age of current

contracting professionals reaching the retirement age. A training department allows DLA to groom

the next generation of contracting professionals efficiently and effectively.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

DLA-HUNTSVILLE
DLA-AVIATION, BLDG 5201 Martin Road 2nd Floor

Redstone Arsenal, AL. 35898

UNOFFICIAL USE ONLY

FOUO

Introduction

Propose DLA Aviation Huntsville add a training department for all new hires. A training department

would be beneficial to organizational success, providing new employees a proper foundation and

introduction to Government contracting. The knowledge is essential to mission success and long-term

retention and employee morale, while never losing sight of DLA’s motto of “Warfighter First.”

Background, Problem, and Purpose

Due to DLA Huntsville’s current organizational restructuring and staffing ramp-up, the need for an

appropriately trained and efficient workforce has never been more apparent. Additionally, according to

govexec.com, fifty-five percent of the current 1102 (contract specialists) workforce are within five years

of retirement (Buble, 2019). With this reduction in the contracting workforce on the horizon, there will be

a massive influx of new employees entering the Government requiring proper training and introduction to

contracting to maintain mission readiness. DLA Huntsville’s mission effectiveness has to ability to be

threatened due to employees becoming retire qualified. The below table will show the estimated number

of employees eligible for retirement for the next four fiscal years and the possible void that can be left.

• Estimated 33 employees eligible for retirement in the next four years.

The above table does not account for normal attrition for various reasons, such as promotions or

relocation. Another drawback to the aging workforce is the amount of experience that will be leaving. A

training department would benefit new hires to learn from experienced employees before individuals

separate from Federal Service.

An employee entering Government contracting at DLA Huntsville with no prior contracting experience

can find the whole process extremely overwhelming. As a contract specialist, one must request access to

twelve ARMY systems and learn the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and contracting process. In

addition, the employee is trying to earn DUWIA certification. Any individual not holding a DUWIA

DLA
HUNTSVILLE

FY
2022

FY
2023

FY
2024

FY
2025

Total Employees

84

84

84

84

Eligible for
Retirement

8

14

6

5

Possible Void Left

33

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

DLA-HUNTSVILLE
DLA-AVIATION, BLDG 5201 Martin Road 2nd Floor

Redstone Arsenal, AL. 35898

UNOFFICIAL USE ONLY

FOUO

certification after twenty-four months of employment can be removed from Federal Service. The DUWIA

certification is mandatory for all 1102 contract specialists. The current training process involves using

Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), screenshots, and interactions with fellow employees to learn the

procurement process. The problem with this method is taking employees away from their workload to

help train the new team member, which hampers productivity and effectiveness. This lack of training

leads to employees leaving the organization, resulting in decreasing retention rates. Loss of employees

leads to overworking existing employees, decreasing morale.

The purpose of the proposed DLA training team would be to introduce new employees to Government

contracting and the processes and procedures necessary to start acquisitions at DLA, while, producing a

skilled workforce with long-term retention.

Proposal, Plan, and Schedule

The proposed implementation of a training department for new employees to the organization. New hires

would be assigned to the training team to process and train for ninety or one hundred twenty days. The

time frame is determined by the employee’s prior experience with Government acquisitions. During the

in-processing and training period, the training department would complete the following:

• Training and enrollment in the thrift savings plan (TSP)

• Introduction to and enrollment in the Federal Benefits package

• Request access and training on all required procurement systems needed to complete a

Government Acquisition

• Acquisition acronyms

• Quiz to identify the parts of the FAR

• The completion of all mandatory local and industry-mandated training (i.e., cybersecurity, ethics,

sexual harassment)

• Walkthrough of the delivery order, planning, and solicitation phases of the procurement process

• Training of Pre and Post-award procedures and processes (needed prior team assignment)

• Introduction to the DLA Huntsville 180-day gated procurement process

• Training on Workflow Management Tool (WMT)

• The completion of all prerequisites and coursework for DUWIA certification, along with

registration for in-seat classes (based on contracting experience)

Upon completion of training employees will become eligible for assignment to a department and

supervisor with the general knowledge and understanding of the Government procurement process.

Additionally, the employee is well along on the path to contracting certification.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

DLA-HUNTSVILLE
DLA-AVIATION, BLDG 5201 Martin Road 2nd Floor

Redstone Arsenal, AL. 35898

UNOFFICIAL USE ONLY

FOUO

Staffing and Budget

Staffing for the proposed training department would come from within the origination, using two veteran

contract specialists on a one-year rotational basis. Rotating trainers allows for training opportunities for

multiple employees while keeping training up to date.

Potential Trainers Requirements

• Warranted Contracting Officer

• DUWIA level three Certified

• Five years of contracting experience

• Proficient skills in all contracts writing systems at DLA Huntsville

• WMT Certified

• General Schedule (GS) level 12 or 13

All employees assigned to the training department will maintain a sixty percent workload preventing a

drop-off in production. Additional duties of trainers are to provide one-hour weekly training 40 weeks per

year to the entire organization to help the organization meet the required eighty CLPs needed every two

years to maintain certification in the acquisition and contracting field. With the addition of a training

department staffed from within, there would be no negative budgetary impact. Additionally, while

employees are assigned to the training department, it would afford cross-training opportunities for

existing employees to fill spots vacated by the employees assigned to the training department.

Conclusion

Implementation of a training department at DLA Aviation would be instrumental in retaining employees.

In addition to increasing retention, the training department will prepare the next generation of contract

specialists before the expected exodus of retirement eligible employees. It will afford them the proper

foundation and initial understanding needed to become productive contract specialists. It is critical to be

proactive, not reactive, when it comes to training and grooming new employees. A well-trained, happy

employee is a productive employee who will help push the organization into the future and maintain a

mission redness and effectiveness in supporting the nation’s warfighter.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

DLA-HUNTSVILLE
DLA-AVIATION, BLDG 5201 Martin Road 2nd Floor

Redstone Arsenal, AL. 35898

UNOFFICIAL USE ONLY

FOUO

References

Buble, C. (2019, August 30). The Aging Federal Workforce Need “New Blood.” Retrieved June 05, 2021,

from Government Executive .com: https://www.govexec.com/workforce/2019/08/aging-federal-

workforce-needs-new-blood-experts-say/159585/

Butler, C. (2021).

Guffey, M. E., & Loewy, D. (2018). Essentials of Business Communication (Vol. 11e). Boston, Ma:

Cengage Learning US.

Katz, E. (2018, June 18). The Federal Agencies Where the most Employees are Eligible to Retire.

Retrieved June 06, 2021, from Government Executive .com: https://www.govexec.com/pay-

benefits/2018/06/federal-agencies-where-most-employees-are-eligible-retire/149091/

Operations Management homework help

Customer Orientation
Level 2

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

1

Communication
Listening to others and communicating in an effective way to encourage open communication.
Customer Orientation
Anticipates and meets the needs of both internal and external customers in a friendly, prompt and professional manner. Demonstrates the willingness and ability to give priority to customers, while delivering and maintaining high standards of quality and service.
Planning & Organizing
Defining tasks and milestones to achieve objectives, whilst ensuring the optimal use of resources.
Influence & Dependability
Persuades others, using different approaches, in order to gain support for a course of action to be adopted and to accept recommendations, cooperation and/or behavior change.
Team Working
Working collaboratively with others to achieve common goals and positive results.
Integrity & Honesty
Behaves in fair, and ethical manner showing consistency in words and actions, even when no one else is around. Sets an example of high standards of integrity and honesty through demonstrated performance.

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2

3

4

5

6

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Agenda

Our brands

Customer demographic

Expectations

Customers and sustainability

Precise skills

Service VS no service

Customer wants and needs

Keeping up with the times

New technologies

Compare to adjust

Be prepared for misfortune

Online presence

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Introduce the different topics to be discussed.

3

Objective

Better understanding of the customers in order to deliver a better oriented customer service.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

The secret of a good business is to be specific and precise. Generalizing takes away from authenticity and lowers the added value of the offer.

4

Our brands

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Tell: Al Hokair is a retailer for different types of brands and offers a big branch of products. Therefor, their costumers vary a lot from a brand to another.

5

Our brands

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Name the types of brands and different franchise being offered. Reflect on the image of each brand and what it inspires. Note the differences between the brands, what population each brand targets, and how they market their franchise.

6

Customer demographic

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Different types of brands target different types of populations. The service has to depend on the customer and what they’re looking for in the brand. Variables such as age group, lifestyle and income should be taken into consideration while assisting the customers.

Example:

Jennifer is a brand for young girls, aged between 13 and 23. They deal with a population that is mainly interested in current trends promoted online.

7

Different customers have different expectations

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Activity: Discuss what the different customer demographics expect from the brands, and how does the customer service meet the expectations effectively.

Example: There are different types of customers. Some customers need a high customer service, and a deeper interaction, meanwhile others expect nothing and prefer no assistance.

8

Customers and sustainability

A new trend came to the surface in recent years. More customers are interested in the sustainability dimensions of a business. A new approach has to be set in place.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Tell: A new generation of woke customers are becoming more invested into the business sustainability dimensions. They are looking for a brand that represents their ecological, social and economical interests.

How do we handle them?

9

How did Desigual do it?

In 2019, the Spanish brand collaborated with Ecoalf proposing a 100% sustainable collection.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Discussing fabric materials, and the making process of the products will engage more with this type of customers.

This is yet another example of complying to the customer’s needs.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

It is worth mentioning if an item is made of organic cotton or linen, as those natural materials are considered the most eco friendly in the fashion industry.

11

Precise skills

Selling is being viewed today as an ‘Art’ and a ‘Science’, with an emphasis on practicing agility to enhance performance.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Selling is being viewed today as an ‘Art’ and a ‘Science’, with an emphasis on practicing agility to enhance performance.

Skills needed to seduce the customer will be discussed in the next slides.

12

Skills

Know your customer

Create the opportunity

Matching customer needs

Know your costumer

Who are they?

First step is identifying your customers.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Identifying your customer: their gender, their age, their lifestyle.

13

Know your costumer

What they do?

A key point in knowing your customers, is learning about their occupations and interests.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

14

Know your costumer

Why and when they buy?

Tracking the customers selling behavior is important to match their needs.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Why they buy

If you know why customers buy a product or service, it’s easier to match their needs to the benefits your business can offer.

When they buy

If you approach a customer just at the time they want to buy, you will massively increase your chances of success.

15

The triple E’s model on how to build an effective costumer service

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Easy- fast response to service requests

Engaging- personalized to individual needs

Effortless- answering questions and issues before they arise or escalate.

Create the opportunity

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Create opportunities for sales: to improve sales we have to create opportunities for sales, we need to impress customers with our service and the way we deal with them.

Welcome and communication: Its important we welcome every single customers that enter our store with a smile and a welcoming greet/script.

Words, tone and body language are all communication skills to be taken into consideration while addressing the customers.

Customers needs and wants: Ask the right questions to identify needs and wants

Listen & acknowledge answers

Mirror customers body language

Go with the customers’ pace

Clarify points to match needs

17

Create opportunities for sales

Welcome and communication

Customers needs and wants

Questioning and listening

Match the customers needs

Know the product to know how to sell it.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

18

The importance of customer service

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Activity: Dress together the advantages and disadvantages of costumer service (cost, efficiency, database, etc.)

19

Service Vs No Service

WHAT IF THERE WAS NO CUSTOMER SERVICE?

Identification:  a customer service representative must help a customer identify and anticipate possible future needs for the customer.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

20

Service Vs No Service

WHAT IF THERE WAS NO CUSTOMER SERVICE?

Needs go unfulfilled: If a customer does not feel that his needs are being met the customer is less likely to buy from the company.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

21

Service Vs No Service

WHAT IF THERE WAS NO CUSTOMER SERVICE?

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

22

Lack of customer database

Lack of demographic insight

Can’t target customers correctly

Service Vs No Service

WHAT IF THERE WAS NO CUSTOMER SERVICE?

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Tell: With no direct feedback from the customers, the business doesn’t have enough information about their products once sold. Therefor their capacities of improvement and targeting a specific market are lowered.

23

No feedback

Low capacity of targeting a specific market

No improvement

Service VS no service

WHAT IF THERE WAS NO CUSTOMER SERVICE?

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

At first view, there is no immediate link between customer service and salaries. But if we think about it for a second, customer service is tightly linked to how much money a business makes, affecting the personnel’s salaries and tips.

24

No customer service

Less sales

Impact on salaries

Customer wants and needs

What does the customer really want?

Can no costumer service be customer service?

Sephora: an example

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Tell: Sometimes, no assistance can be a customer service in itself. Sephora uses this new tactic to put the customer more at ease.

25

Keeping up with the times

Keep up with the new technologies.

Compare with different countries and competitors.

Always be prepared for misfortune.

Online presence is key.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Keeping up with the new technologies

Nokia an example:

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Tell: Let’s take the example of Nokia, who was the leader and best-selling company for mobile telephones, but is now struggling against the competition from Apple. Their decline is explained by their incapacity of keeping up with the smartphone market and its new technologies. Apple adopted a more customer service oriented strategy, involving a limited warranty with an authorized wireless carrier, besides opening retail stores all over the world such as Aleph stores.

27

Keeping up with the new technologies

There are various tools provided by today’s modern-day technology that salespeople can use to sell better and enhance their productivity. Such tools are as follows:

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Tell: Through the years, technologies have been developed to make life easier in every aspect. They should be used without moderation to enhance productivity.

28

Compare to adjust

It is important to learn about your competitors’ approach.

It’s also helpful to compare yourself with different countries. People today are traveling more and expecting more.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Be prepared for misfortune

Covid-19 crisis, a lesson:

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Tell: With the national lockdown and the social distancing measures, classical customer service had to reintroduce itself in a new way.

30

Online presence

Today, everything happens online, from sales to surveys.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Tell: If there is one lesson we learned from the coronavirus crisis, it’s the importance of online presence. When all shops were closed, the only way to keep in touch with the customers is through social media, and customer service chat rooms.

The businesses that were impacted less by this crisis are those who were already invested into their online presence. For us, we had to save our seasonal sales expectations through this method.

31

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Any questions or queries please contact:

talent.development@fahretail.com

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Operations Management homework help

HR-Employee-Attrition

Operations Management homework help

3

Week 2 Apply: Strategic Plan Research

Week 2 Apply: Strategic Plan Research

Procter and Gamble (P&G) is the chosen organization for investigation in this course. P&G is well-known across many global markets as they are a billion-dollar organization. They are part of the consumer goods industry that produces and sells many household goods. This brief analysis will describe their strategic growth plan.

Where P&G is Going

From an integrated growth perspective, P&G focuses their attention on performance changes that makes consumers choose their company (Procter and Gamble, 2022). P&G wants their growth to be balanced and create values for their consumers. One way they accomplish this is by providing global access to their services and products.

External and Internal Environments

P&G boasts having a positive and empowering internal and external environment. One of their motto’s is to “lead with love.” They have a group of valued partners that help to create acts of goods in as many communities as possible. P&G also offers several opportunities for career growth with their current employees, and they offer tuition reimbursement programs. They create love both within and outside.

People Plan

P&G has a diverse work organization that is agile, empowers employees, and holds everyone accountable for their actions. They pride themselves as being unique and united as they are an inclusive workplace (Procter and Gamble, 2022). Additionally, they feel that creating a diverse workforce helps them to better serve their communities. This includes having equal representation among gender and being multicultural.

Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Sustainability

P&G is involved with several projects related to social responsibility and environment sustainability. They specifically deal in climate, forestry, plastic packaging, and water. They provide clean water to residents of Zimbabwe, and this started when that country was experiencing a lack of clean water. P&G works to preserve many forests around the country to ensure they are available to future generations (Procter and Gamble, 2022). Furthermore, they work to provide sustainable packaging and engage in regular recycling and waste management processes.

References

Procter and Gamble. (2022). What Do We Mean by Strategy? Retrieved from:

https://prod.reader-ui.prod.mheducation.com/epub/sn_4e83/data-uuid-d4267f5b73bc4f6581906e00f0446b5b

Operations Management homework help

Risk and Quality Sections of the Project Plan

In Units II and III, you completed the Project Overview section of your project plan. It is now time to work on the following sections: Risk Assessment and Quality Management Report.

In this assignment, you are required to complete sections 2 and 3 of the project plan. Refer to your unit lesson (from this unit and last unit) and required unit resources to advance your project plan. Create the sections listed below.

2. Risk Assessment: Include evidence of the risk assessment. The section is divided into subsections on identification of risks, analysis (assessment of risk probability and consequences), and mitigation strategies.

2.1 Risk Identification: Describe all relevant risk variables for the project, including a brief description of the risk variable and the ways in which it is likely to affect the project.

2.2 Assessment of Probability and Consequence (Qualitative): Include a qualitative risk assessment matrix in this space. Give evidence of how you arrived at this assessment.

2.3 Assessment of Probability and Consequence (Quantitative): Include a quantitative assessment of probability and consequences, clearly identifying the criteria used for determining both probability of failure and consequence of failure.

2.4 Mitigation Strategies: Identify individual mitigation strategies for each high-priority risk factor. Briefly specify actions to be taken in order to accomplish the strategy.

3. Quality Management Report: In this section, be sure to define what quality means for your project from both a product and process standpoint. Include your project quality standards and expectations both internally and for the customer, the metrics and measures for success, and critical success factors. How will you monitor quality throughout the project? Who will be responsible?

This assignment should be a minimum of two pages in length, not counting the title page and reference page. Be sure to use proper APA formatting. Citations are not required; however, if outside sources are used, make certain to provide in-text citations and references.

Project Schedule

In this unit, you are required to complete the Project Schedule section of the project plan. Refer to your unit lesson (from this unit and last unit) and required unit resources to advance your project plan. For this assignment, create the components listed below.

4. Project Schedule: Include the duration estimates for all project activities, their activity networks, the project critical

path, and estimated project duration.

4.1 Activity Duration Estimates: Include a table with activity number, activity, predecessors, optimistic duration, most likely duration, pessimistic duration, and estimated duration. Be sure to show your paths as well as the critical path.

4.2 Gantt Chart: Show the task, duration, predecessors, and the schedule leveling.

4.3 Activity Network: Be sure to include fully completed nodes, including early start, early finish, late start, late finish, and activity float/slack.

This assignment should be a minimum of two pages in length, not counting the title page and reference page. Be sure to use proper APA formatting. Citations are not required; however, if outside sources are used, make certain to provide in-text citations and references in APA format. For more elaboration on what you should include in your project plan, refer to pp.

539–542 in your textbook.

Cost Estimation and Budgeting

In this unit, you are required to complete the Project Budget section of the project plan. Refer to your unit lesson and required unit resources to advance your project plan. You may also need to revisit the Unit V Lesson. For this assignment, create the components listed below.

2. Project Budget: Include cost estimation and project budget. Include direct and indirect costs, recurring and nonrecurring costs, and any expedited costs.

2.1 Project Resources: Identify all project resources. Develop a cost table for all project resources.

2.2 Other Costs: Identify all significant costs for materials (e.g., equipment, overhead, expediting).

2.3 Cost Estimates: Submit ballpark, comparative, and feasibility estimates. Show all information gathered to support these estimates.

2.4 Time-Phased Budget: Include estimated expenses for duration increments (e.g., days, weeks, and quarters).

This assignment should be a minimum of two pages in length, not counting the title page and reference page. Be sure to use proper APA formatting. Citations are not required; however, if outside sources are used, make certain to provide in-text citations and references in lude in your project plan, refer to pp.

539–542 in your textbook.

Communications and Control

In this unit, you are required to complete the following sections: Communications Management and Tracking and Status Updates. Refer to your unit lesson (from this unit and last unit) and required unit resources to advance your project plan. For this unit, create the sections listed below.

2. Communications Management: Identify all critical communications channels for project stakeholders, frequency of communications, types of information to be communicated, and the project status-tracking plan. Where appropriate, include electronic media used for collaborative purposes (e.g., Google Docs, Yammer, and Facebook). Also, in cases of geographically dispersed project teams, indicate methods for regular communications. Please review the discussion from Chapter 6 on team communication methods. An example of a communications management protocol is shown on p. 541 of your textbook.

3. Tracking and Status Updates: Indicate the methods the project team will use to regularly update the project status, including methods for tracking project progress, and identify which organizational stakeholders receive notification of the project status.

3.1 Tracking Method: Show the method used to track project status (e.g., S-curve, earned value, milestones). Indicate the regularity of these assessments (i.e., monthly, as needed, or upon completion of major deliverables). For earned value assessments, indicate how you will provide updated cost performance index (CPI) and schedule performance index (SPI) data. See p. 542 of your textbook.

3.2 Notification Record: Provide a record of project status update communications. Indicate who received project updates and show sign-off by key stakeholders upon their receipt of status updates.

3.3 Control Systems: Indicate the forms of project control to be used for the project, including configuration control, design control, quality control, document control, and trend monitoring. Develop control documentation for each form of control you intend to use, including a list of key organizational stakeholders who will be copied on all control documents and status updates.

This assignment should be a minimum of two pages in length, not counting the title page and reference page. Be sure to use proper APA formatting. Citations are not required; however, if outside sources are used, make certain to provide in-text citations and references include in your project plan, refer to pp.

539–542 in your textbook.

Project Closing

In Unit VIII, you are required to complete the Project Closeout section of your project plan. Refer to your unit lesson and required unit resources to advance your project plan. For this unit, create the section listed below.

2. Project Closeout: All necessary project closeout documentation should be included. Work completed or soon to be- completed must be identified, along with any configuration management changes.

2.1 Close Cost Accounts: Discuss completing and closing all project cost accounts and other financial closeouts.

2.2 Lessons Learned: Complete a Lessons Learned assessment that identifies key concepts learned and suggestions for future projects. What is your plan for retention of this information?

The Project Closeout section should be a minimum of two pages in length. You will need to add the Project Closeout section to your previous work from Units II–VII and submit a cohesive, complete, polished document for your final project plan. You will submit only one document; you do not have to submit the Project Closeout section separately. Be sure that you have incorporated modifications based on your professor’s feedback throughout Units II–VII.

This assignment should be a minimum of two pages in length, not counting the title page and reference page. Be sure to use proper APA formatting. Citations are not required; however, if outside sources are used, make certain to provide in-text citations and references include in your project plan, refer to pp.

539–542 in your textbook.

Operations Management homework help

Customer Orientation
Level 3

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

1

EmployeeNo. Status Age BusinessTravel Department Education EducationField Gender JobRole JobSatisfaction MaritalStatus MonthlyIncome NumCompaniesWorked PercentSalaryHike PerformanceRating TotalWorkingYears TrainingTimesLastYear WorkLifeBalance YearsAtCompany YearsInCurrentRole YearsSinceLastPromotion
1 Former 41 Travel_Rarely Sales Associate Degree Life Sciences Female Sales Executive Very Satisfied Single 5993 8 11 3 8 0 1 6 4 0
2 Current 49 Travel_Frequently Research & Development High School or Equivalent Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Somewhat Satisfied Married 5130 1 23 4 10 3 3 10 7 1
3 Former 37 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Other Male Laboratory Technician Satisfied Single 2090 6 15 1 7 3 3 0 0 0
4 Current 33 Travel_Frequently Research & Development Graduate Degree Life Sciences Female Research Scientist Satisfied Married 2909 1 11 3 8 3 3 8 7 3
5 Current 27 Travel_Rarely Research & Development High School or Equivalent Medical Male Laboratory Technician Somewhat Satisfied Married 3468 9 12 3 6 3 3 2 2 2
6 Current 32 Travel_Frequently Research & Development Associate Degree Life Sciences Male Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Single 3068 0 13 3 8 2 2 7 7 3
7 Current 59 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Female Laboratory Technician Unsatisfied Married 2670 4 20 1 12 3 2 1 0 0
8 Current 30 Travel_Rarely Research & Development High School or Equivalent Life Sciences Male Laboratory Technician Satisfied Divorced 2693 1 22 4 1 2 3 1 0 0
9 Current 38 Travel_Frequently Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Manufacturing Director Satisfied Single 9526 0 21 4 10 2 3 9 7 1
10 Current 36 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Male Healthcare Representative Satisfied Married 5237 6 13 3 17 3 2 7 7 7
11 Current 35 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Male Laboratory Technician Somewhat Satisfied Married 2426 0 13 3 6 5 3 5 4 0
12 Current 29 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Life Sciences Female Laboratory Technician Satisfied Single 4193 0 12 3 10 3 3 9 5 0
13 Current 31 Travel_Rarely Research & Development High School or Equivalent Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Satisfied Divorced 2911 1 17 3 5 1 2 5 2 4
14 Current 34 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Medical Male Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Divorced 2661 0 11 3 3 2 3 2 2 1
15 Former 28 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Laboratory Technician Satisfied Single 2028 5 14 3 6 4 3 4 2 0
16 Current 29 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Life Sciences Female Manufacturing Director Unsatisfied Divorced 9980 1 11 3 10 1 3 10 9 8
17 Current 32 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Somewhat Satisfied Divorced 3298 0 12 3 7 5 2 6 2 0
18 Current 22 Nontravel Research & Development Associate Degree Medical Male Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Divorced 2935 1 13 3 1 2 2 1 0 0
19 Current 53 Travel_Rarely Sales Graduate Degree Life Sciences Female Manager Very Satisfied Married 15427 2 16 3 31 3 3 15 8 3
20 Current 38 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Very Satisfied Single 3944 5 11 2 6 3 3 3 2 1
21 Current 24 Nontravel Research & Development Associate Degree Other Female Manufacturing Director Satisfied Divorced 4011 0 18 3 5 5 2 4 2 1
22 Former 36 Travel_Rarely Sales Graduate Degree Life Sciences Male Sales Representative Unsatisfied Single 3407 7 23 4 10 4 3 5 3 0
23 Current 34 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Life Sciences Female Research Director Somewhat Satisfied Single 11994 0 11 1 13 4 3 12 6 2
24 Current 21 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Very Satisfied Single 1232 1 14 1 0 6 3 0 0 0
25 Former 34 Travel_Rarely Research & Development High School or Equivalent Medical Male Research Scientist Unsatisfied Single 2960 2 11 3 8 2 3 4 2 1
26 Current 53 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Other Female Manager Satisfied Divorced 19094 4 11 3 26 3 2 14 13 4
27 Former 32 Travel_Frequently Research & Development High School or Equivalent Life Sciences Female Research Scientist Unsatisfied Single 3919 1 22 4 10 5 3 10 2 6
28 Current 42 Travel_Rarely Sales Graduate Degree Marketing Male Sales Executive Somewhat Satisfied Married 6825 0 11 3 10 2 3 9 7 4
29 Current 44 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Medical Female Healthcare Representative Very Satisfied Married 10248 3 14 3 24 4 3 22 6 5
30 Current 46 Travel_Rarely Sales Graduate Degree Marketing Female Manager Unsatisfied Single 18947 3 12 3 22 2 2 2 2 2
31 Current 33 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Male Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Single 2496 4 11 3 7 3 3 1 1 0
32 Current 44 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Other Male Healthcare Representative Very Satisfied Married 6465 2 13 3 9 5 4 4 2 1
33 Current 30 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Medical Male Laboratory Technician Satisfied Single 2206 1 13 3 10 5 3 10 0 1
34 Former 39 Travel_Rarely Sales Undergraduate Degree Technical Degree Male Sales Representative Very Satisfied Married 2086 3 14 3 19 6 4 1 0 0
35 Former 24 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Male Research Scientist Very Satisfied Married 2293 2 16 3 6 2 2 2 0 2
36 Current 43 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Medical Female Research Scientist Satisfied Divorced 2645 1 12 3 6 3 2 5 3 1
37 Former 50 Travel_Rarely Sales Associate Degree Marketing Male Sales Representative Satisfied Married 2683 1 14 3 3 2 3 3 2 0
38 Current 35 Travel_Rarely Sales Undergraduate Degree Marketing Female Sales Representative Very Satisfied Married 2014 1 13 3 2 3 3 2 2 2
39 Current 36 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Life Sciences Female Research Scientist Unsatisfied Married 3419 9 14 3 6 3 4 1 1 0
40 Current 33 Travel_Frequently Sales Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Female Sales Executive Unsatisfied Married 5376 2 19 3 10 3 3 5 3 1
41 Current 35 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Other Male Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Divorced 1951 1 12 1 1 3 3 1 0 0
42 Current 27 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Life Sciences Female Laboratory Technician Unsatisfied Divorced 2341 1 13 3 1 6 3 1 0 0
43 Former 26 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Laboratory Technician Satisfied Single 2293 1 12 1 1 2 2 1 0 0
44 Current 27 Travel_Frequently Sales Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Sales Executive Satisfied Single 8726 1 15 3 9 0 3 9 8 1
45 Current 30 Travel_Frequently Research & Development Associate Degree Medical Female Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Single 4011 1 23 4 12 2 3 12 8 3
46 Former 41 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Technical Degree Female Research Director Satisfied Married 19545 1 12 3 23 0 3 22 15 15
47 Current 34 Nontravel Sales Graduate Degree Marketing Male Sales Executive Satisfied Single 4568 0 20 4 10 2 3 9 5 8
48 Current 37 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Somewhat Satisfied Married 3022 4 21 2 8 1 3 1 0 0
49 Current 46 Travel_Frequently Sales Graduate Degree Marketing Male Sales Executive Very Satisfied Single 5772 4 21 4 14 4 3 9 6 0
50 Current 35 Travel_Rarely Research & Development High School or Equivalent Life Sciences Male Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Married 2269 1 19 3 1 2 3 1 0 0
51 Former 48 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Life Sciences Male Laboratory Technician Satisfied Single 5381 9 13 3 23 2 3 1 0 0
52 Former 28 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Technical Degree Male Laboratory Technician Satisfied Single 3441 1 13 3 2 3 2 2 2 2
53 Current 44 Travel_Rarely Sales Doctorate Marketing Female Sales Executive Unsatisfied Divorced 5454 5 21 4 9 2 2 4 3 1
54 Current 35 Nontravel Research & Development Associate Degree Medical Male Healthcare Representative Unsatisfied Married 9884 2 13 3 10 3 3 4 0 2
55 Current 26 Travel_Rarely Sales Undergraduate Degree Marketing Female Sales Executive Very Satisfied Married 4157 7 19 3 5 2 2 2 2 0
56 Current 33 Travel_Frequently Research & Development Associate Degree Life Sciences Female Research Director Very Satisfied Single 13458 1 12 1 15 1 3 15 14 8
57 Current 35 Travel_Frequently Sales Doctorate Life Sciences Male Sales Executive Unsatisfied Married 9069 1 22 4 9 3 2 9 8 1
58 Current 35 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Medical Female Laboratory Technician Unsatisfied Married 4014 3 15 3 4 3 3 2 2 2
59 Current 31 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Life Sciences Male Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Divorced 5915 3 22 2 10 3 2 7 7 1
60 Current 37 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Life Sciences Male Manufacturing Director Satisfied Divorced 5993 1 18 3 7 2 4 7 5 0
61 Current 32 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Male Manufacturing Director Very Satisfied Married 6162 1 22 4 9 3 3 9 8 7
62 Current 38 Travel_Frequently Research & Development Doctorate Life Sciences Female Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Single 2406 1 11 3 10 2 3 10 3 9
63 Current 50 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Associate Degree Medical Female Research Director Satisfied Divorced 18740 5 12 3 29 2 2 17 3 13
64 Current 59 Travel_Rarely Sales Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Female Sales Executive Unsatisfied Single 7637 7 11 3 28 3 2 21 16 7
65 Current 36 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Technical Degree Female Healthcare Representative Satisfied Divorced 10096 1 13 3 17 2 3 17 14 12
66 Current 55 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Female Manager Satisfied Divorced 14756 2 14 3 21 2 3 5 0 0
67 Current 36 Travel_Frequently Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Manufacturing Director Somewhat Satisfied Single 6499 1 13 3 6 3 3 6 5 0
68 Current 45 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Unsatisfied Divorced 9724 2 17 1 25 2 3 1 0 0
69 Current 35 Travel_Frequently Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Male Research Scientist Unsatisfied Married 2194 4 13 1 5 2 2 3 2 1
70 Former 36 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Male Research Scientist Satisfied Married 3388 0 17 3 2 0 2 1 0 0
71 Current 59 Travel_Frequently Sales High School or Equivalent Life Sciences Female Sales Executive Satisfied Single 5473 7 11 3 20 2 2 4 3 1
72 Current 29 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Somewhat Satisfied Married 2703 0 23 2 6 3 3 5 4 0
73 Current 31 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Medical Male Research Scientist Somewhat Satisfied Single 2501 1 17 3 1 4 3 1 1 1
74 Current 32 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Male Research Scientist Somewhat Satisfied Married 6220 1 17 3 10 3 3 10 4 0
75 Current 36 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Life Sciences Female Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Married 3038 3 12 3 5 3 3 1 0 0
76 Current 31 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Life Sciences Female Manufacturing Director Very Satisfied Single 4424 1 23 4 11 2 3 11 7 1
77 Current 35 Travel_Rarely Sales Graduate Degree Marketing Male Sales Executive Unsatisfied Single 4312 0 14 3 16 2 3 15 13 2
78 Current 45 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Other Male Research Director Unsatisfied Married 13245 4 14 3 17 3 4 0 0 0
79 Current 37 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Graduate Degree Medical Male Research Director Satisfied Single 13664 4 13 3 16 3 4 5 2 0
80 Current 46 Travel_Rarely Human Resources Associate Degree Medical Male Human Resources Somewhat Satisfied Divorced 5021 8 22 4 16 2 3 4 2 0
81 Current 30 Travel_Rarely Research & Development High School or Equivalent Life Sciences Male Laboratory Technician Very Satisfied Married 5126 1 12 3 10 1 2 10 8 3
82 Current 35 Travel_Rarely Research & Development Undergraduate Degree Medical Male Research Scientist Satisfied Single 2859 1 18 3 6 3 3 6 4 0
83 Current 55 Travel_Rarely Sales Associate Degree Life Sciences Male Sales Executive Very Satisfied Married 10239 3 14 3 24 4 3 1 0 1
Communication
Listening to others and communicating in an effective way to encourage open communication.
Customer Orientation
Anticipates and meets the needs of both internal and external customers in a friendly, prompt and professional manner. Demonstrates the willingness and ability to give priority to customers, while delivering and maintaining high standards of quality and service.
Planning & Organizing
Defining tasks and milestones to achieve objectives, whilst ensuring the optimal use of resources.
Influence & Dependability
Persuades others, using different approaches, in order to gain support for a course of action to be adopted and to accept recommendations, cooperation and/or behavior change.
Team Working
Working collaboratively with others to achieve common goals and positive results.
Integrity & Honesty
Behaves in fair, and ethical manner showing consistency in words and actions, even when no one else is around. Sets an example of high standards of integrity and honesty through demonstrated performance.

1

2

3

4

5

6

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Agenda

What does Customer Orientation mean to you?

You as a customer

For your customers

Exploring the buyer’s decision-making process

Structuring successful sales

Why do customers leave?

What could “indifference” mean?

Why service matters

Some statistics

What are Service Standards

Understand the importance of Customer Service Standards

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Introduce the different topics to be discussed.

3

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4

What does Customer Orientation mean to you?

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Customer orientation is a business approach in which a company solves for the customer first. It’s all about focusing on helping customers meet their goals. Essentially, the needs and wants of the customer are valued over the needs of the business. For customer service, this means your support team is focused on meeting customer needs.

5

You as a customer

Your experiences

Share a good service experience

Share a bad service experience

What will be your future actions ‘good service’ and ‘bad service’ provided to you?

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6

You as a customer

Do you demand action?

Do you make it clear what you want?

Do you lack patience?

Do you tend to speak faster?

Are you focused on results?

Are you usually not interested in detail?

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7

For your customers

Your customers are people like you

Their reactions will be similar that of yours

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Exploring the buyer’s decision-making process

This buying process is worth considering ,as it can enable you to map behavior in the sales cycle.

The traditional process is follows:

The realization of a need

Searching for information and opinions

specific options Evaluation of against agreed criteria

Purchase

Post-sales evaluation

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In order to be a proactive part of sales experience ,you must understand where your customer is in his or her decision making process, and how you can help them through

that process.

9

Structuring successful sales

The sales process needs to follow a similar path to the buying process

Prepare

Connect

Probe

Match

Agree

Close

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(Prepare)

Find out as much as possible about the person you are selling to and investigate what potential needs you may be able to meet

(Connect)

Introduce yourself in some way and start the process of tuning in to the potential customer

(probe)

This stage in the one that is so often missed by pushy salespeople or done in such a way that it lacks integrity or sincerity

(match)

This stage is our opportunity to domonstrated how our product matches the unmet needs the customer

(agree)

This agreement stage is criticlal because it enables the salesperson to help the customer work through common objectionss and become alingned on how the solution matches requirments

10

Why do customers leave?

Move away -4%

Friendships -5%

Competition -9%

Dissatisfaction -14%

Indifference -68%

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11

What could “indifference” mean?

Not being empathetic

Not listening carefully

Not reverting as discussed

Not looking for solution but quoting “Company Policy”

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Why service matters

▪86 % of customers expect better services than they did five years ago.

▪82% of customers will switch loyalty if better services are not given

▪35 % said that a mere ‘Sorry’ would have stopped from moving off.

▪The cost of acquiring new customers is 5 times the cost of keeping old ones happy

▪Old customers bring returns about 3 to 7 times more than a new customer. ▪

Increasing customer retention by 5 % can raise profits by 25 to 30% ▪

Reducing customer problems by 1 % can increase profits a few crores over the years

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Some statistics

Out of 100 dissatisfied customers

Only 4% will complain

96% will just go away

Of those who go away, only 5% will return

91% will never return to you.

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14

Some Statistics

64% of customers feel companies with which they frequently interface by telephone are not respectful of their time

It takes between 2-5 times the cost to find a new customer as to retain a customer

Reducing these customer defections by 5% could increase profits as much as 50%.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

What are Service Standards

Every organization strives for quality, consistency, efficiency and best practice. Service standards can help ensure your organization in getting the best results and show you how to keep improving.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

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16

Importance of Customer Service Standards

Good service standards are based on a thorough understanding of who your customers are, what they need and/or expect from a product or service you provide.

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Characteristics of Good Service Standards

Relevant to the customer:

Based on consultation:

Measurable:

Ambitious but realistic:

Endorsed by management:

Communicated:

Transparent:

Continuously updated:

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Relevant to the customer: Service standards are consistent with customer priorities. This means they must address aspects of the service that customers value most within available resource allocations. 

Based on consultation: Service standards are developed in consultation with customers and staff particularly frontline staff who are responsible for delivering the service. They should also have the support of managements to ensure that they are meaningful and match the organisations’ overall purpose and values.

 Measurable: Service standards are quantifiable and linked to monitoring activities.  Consistent: Service standards should be consistent across the board. For example, customers who visit a Sainsbury’s store in South London expects the same treatment if they visit another store in North London. Similarly, a customer who interacts with your reception staff expects the same high standards when they interact with your catering staff. It is also easier to share best practices and adopt common approaches when standards are approached in an integrated manner. 

Ambitious but realistic: Service standards are realistic, based on analysis and consistent with objectives you want to achieve, yet sufficiently challenging to the customer service team. 

Endorsed by management: Service standards are understood and endorsed by senior management.  Communicated: Service standards are clearly communicated to customers, staff, and other stakeholders to help manage expectations. 

Transparent: Service standards should be stated clearly and well documented. They should also be monitored and performance results should be shared with relevant stakeholders. 

Continuously updated: Service standards are regularly reviewed and updated as appropriate.

18

Benefits of Good Service Standards

Service standards provide the behavioral template by making expectations clear

Service standards lead to consistent service and can be a valuable training resource

They set benchmarks that can be used to monitor and improve service standards 

They provide the proper tools to help staff achieve standards set 

They provide necessary tools to evaluate current customer service quality 

They provide information that helps pinpoint problems areas in service so corrections can be made 

They create an environment where rewards can be given based on whether standards are reached and maintained

Service standards can also form a valuable part of marketing material, whether in print or web form

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

19

Steps for developing Customer Service standards

1. Establish Priorities for Service Standards

2. Plan and develop

3. Implement the standards

4. Measure performance against service standards

5. Act on the results

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

20

Successful customer

Present customer benefit

Focus on collecting information from customer

Put customer needs at the center-stage, not your product/ service

Customers open up slowly; don’t force the pace

First impressions are very important- be polite and tactful

Try and assess personality type of customer. Don’t make hasty judgments.

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Any questions or queries please contact:

talent.development@fahretail.com

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

6 CORE/BEHAVIOUR COMPETENCIES

Operations Management homework help

Formal Report and Executive Presentation

Formal Report and Executive Presentation Using Chapter 02 – “Overcrowding in a hospital emergency department” from the Wilding (2019) textbook as a baseline, consider how operations management and logistics are closely related. Either use your workplace as an example or research an organization that has been involved in organizing a relief effort during a crisis. Show how they problem-solved to alleviate bottlenecks in the supply chain. Provide graphs and charts as necessary. The 6-10 page formal report should be in APA style. In addition, you will prepare a brief 5-10 slide PowerPoint or Prezi presentation on your findings and recommendations. Your presentation should consist of (1) the slides and (2) written narrative of what you would say if presenting your findings and recommendations to an executive board for consideration. You will submit your report (Word doc) and presentation (PPT). The PowerPoint should include your “narration” in the Notes area. If you create a Prezi, submit your narration as a Word doc, with the URL of your Prezi at the top of the page.

NB/ The questions in the overcrowding are answered already don’t mind them just concentrate on above.

Graphical user interface, text, application, Word  Description automatically generated

Text  Description automatically generated

Text  Description automatically generated

Graphical user interface, text, application  Description automatically generated

Text  Description automatically generated

Text  Description automatically generated

Text  Description automatically generated

Graphical user interface, text, application  Description automatically generated

Operations Management homework help

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access

A strategic initiative to facilitate knowledge
translation research in rehabilitation
Katherine Montpetit-Tourangeau1,2* , Dahlia Kairy1,2, Sara Ahmed2,3,4, Dana Anaby2,3,5, André Bussières2,3,6,
Marie-Ève Lamontagne7,8, Annie Rochette1,2, Keiko Shikako-Thomas2,3,5 and Aliki Thomas2,3,9

Abstract

Background: While there is a growing body of literature supporting clinical decision-making for rehabilitation
professionals, suboptimal use of evidence-based practices in that field persists. A strategic initiative that
ensures the relevance of the research and its implementation in the context of rehabilitation could 1) help
improve the coordination of knowledge translation (KT) research and 2) enhance the delivery of evidence-
based rehabilitation services offered to patients with physical disabilities. This paper describes the process and
methods used to develop a KT strategic initiative aimed at building capacity and coordinating KT research in
physical rehabilitation and its strategic plan; it also reports the initial applications of the strategic plan
implementation.

Methods: We used a 3-phase process consisting of an online environmental scan to identify the extent of KT
research activities in physical rehabilitation in Quebec, Canada. Data from the environmental scan was used to
develop a strategic plan that structures KT research in physical rehabilitation. Seven external KT experts in
health science reviewed the strategic plan for consistency and applicability.

Results: Sixty-four KT researchers were identified and classified according to the extent of their level of
involvement in KT. Ninety-six research projects meeting eligibility criteria were funded by eight of the
fourteen agencies and organizations searched. To address the identified gaps, a 5-year strategic plan was
developed, containing a mission, a vision, four main goals, nine strategies and forty-two actions.

Conclusion: Such initiatives can help guide researchers and relevant key stakeholders, to structure, organize
and advance KT research in the field of rehabilitation. The strategies are being implemented progressively to
meet the strategic initiative’s mission and ultimately enhance users’ rehabilitation services.

Keywords: Knowledge translation research, Strategic initiative, Implementation, Evidence-based practice ,
Physical rehabilitation, Physical disabilities

© The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License,
which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give
appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if
changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons
licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons
licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain
permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the
data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

* Correspondence: katherine.montpetit-tourangeau@umontreal.ca
1School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, P.O.
Box 6128, Station Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada
2Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation, Montreal, Quebec,
Canada
Full list of author information is available at the end of the article

Montpetit-Tourangeau et al. BMC Health Services Research (2020) 20:973
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-020-05772-8

Background
In different public health systems, there is a growing
need to synthesise, adapt and apply the exponential
amount of scientific evidence being generated in order
to respond to patients’ expectations to receive the best
possible care [1, 2]. Rehabilitation professionals, as vital
members of interdisciplinary healthcare teams, offer ser-
vices often in complex and unique practice settings
aimed at enabling individuals with disabilities to reach
and maintain their optimal physical, sensory, intellectual,
psychological and social functional levels, and to
optimize their participation in desired life domains [3].
Rehabilitation as a distinct field of practice often re-
quires unique and tailored methods for knowledge trans-
lation (KT).
Despite a growing body of research in rehabilitation that

can be used to support clinical decision-making and inter-
ventions to improve patient outcomes [4–10], studies have
identified suboptimal research utilization in rehabilitation
throughout the life span and across various conditions
such as stroke [11], musculoskeletal disorders [12–20],
paediatric conditions [21] and other chronic conditions
[22, 23]. Barriers to uptake of research findings in rehabili-
tation include lack of time, limited confidence in the crit-
ical appraisal and use of research information, and limited
support from management [17, 24–26]. Higher academic
degrees, participation in research and close proximity be-
tween researchers and clinicians, student supervision and
collaborative practice environments are factors found to
facilitate research use [27–30]. Organizational determi-
nants such as leadership style, social capital and the avail-
ability of resources [31–33] can also influence clinicians’
uptake of evidence-based practice (EBP). Studies con-
ducted in rehabilitation suggest that systems-level changes
and shifts in the organization’s paradigm, such as involv-
ing rehabilitation professionals in the research teams, can
reduce the aforementioned barriers and promote a culture
of EBP [27, 34–36].
Knowledge translation (KT) research in rehabilitation

aims to identify individual and organisational barriers
and facilitators and to develop, implement and assess
the impact of strategies used to narrow the research-
practice gap. Despite KT being a growing field, recent
systematic reviews suggest that the amount and quality
of the evidence on effective KT strategies to promote the
use of EBP in rehabilitation is still limited [11, 37, 38].
The reviews also show a paucity of research on active,
complex KT interventions as well as on the methods
that may be used to evaluate the success of these KT in-
terventions. Moreover, there is an absence of coordi-
nated efforts aimed at developing and implementing KT
plans and of training in that field [17, 39, 40]. As a KT
plan is increasingly required by a growing number of

funding agencies [41], researchers need to integrate ef-
fective KT strategies based on implementation science to
build their KT plan [41], and include the relevant stake-
holders throughout the research process [42].
Even though resources are limited, conducting KT re-

search in rehabilitation using theory-based KT interven-
tions and assessing robust outcome measures is needed
[42]. Efforts should aim to increase the body of research
in KT in rehabilitation and strengthen the implementa-
tion and evaluation of KT strategies in this context [43–
45]. From a research standpoint, there is a need to col-
lectively build the necessary bridges among people and
organizations developing KT initiatives in clinical prac-
tice to share and improve the conduct of KT research
[42]. Researchers and graduate students would benefit
from having access to mentoring [46, 47]. Importantly,
there is thus a need to support efforts to accelerate the
uptake of EBP in clinical practice by advancing the KT
research agenda in rehabilitation.
One way forward is to better understand the structures

that can support researchers in designing, implementing,
and evaluating KT strategies. This paper reports on the
development and outcomes of the Knowledge Transla-
tion Strategic Initiative in Rehabilitation in Quebec (KT-
SIRQ). This initiative leads, monitors and facilitates re-
search developments in KT in rehabilitation for individ-
uals with physical disabilities in one large Canadian
province.
The objective of this paper is to describe a multiphase

systematic process used to create the initiative and the
initial applications of the implementation of the initia-
tive’s strategic plan. We used the Knowledge-to-action
(KTA) framework [48] to strategically address EBP gaps
in rehabilitation in different settings.

Methodology
Context
This study took place in Quebec, Canada, where each of
the ten provinces and three territories has its own Min-
istry of Health and Social Services (MHSS), but the Can-
adian health care system is under the jurisdiction of the
federal Ministry of Health. In Quebec, the MHSS admin-
isters health and social services across the province. A
delegated minister is responsible for Rehabilitation,
Youth Protection, Public Health and Healthy Living. Re-
habilitation is a major priority across the country and
most rehabilitation service structures are common be-
tween provinces [49–51].
The process of developing the 5-year strategic plan

consisted of two phases: 1) an environmental scan
(phase 1); and 2) the development of the strategic plan
using a modified Delphi approach (phase 2A) and its val-
idation (phase 2B). The data from the environmental

Montpetit-Tourangeau et al. BMC Health Services Research (2020) 20:973 Page 2 of 10

scan were obtained from public websites and did not re-
quire ethics approval. The core team members were in-
volved in the Delphi which did not require ethics
approval. The validation process was exclusively for im-
provement purpose and did not constitute in a research
process, thus it also did not require ethical approval.
Ethical approval was obtained by the Centre for Interdis-
ciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal
(CRIR-1169-0616) and institutional convenience of the
targeted establishments from which we recruited partici-
pants for the survey conducted in the initial applications
of the strategic plan.

Phase 1: environmental scan
Environmental scans consist of an exploratory review used
to examine the state of a particular system to better
understand its needs and context [52–54]. The purpose of
our environmental scan conducted between November
2014 and October 2015 was to 1) identify KT researchers
whose work was focused on the various stages and/or
components of the KT process and research activities in
the field of rehabilitation for patients living with physical
disabilities in the province; and 2) to document the state
of KT research related to physical disabilities.

Search strategy
All searches for the environmental scan were conducted
online (e.g., research centers websites) and/or by con-
tacting funding agencies and organizations by email or
phone. The search initially included rehabilitation re-
searchers in all universities within the province. The
keywords were defined based on the steps of the KTA
framework [48] and included among others ‘dissemin-
ation’, ‘knowledge synthesis’ and ‘implementation’. The
terms used to represent KT vary greatly, which explains
the large number of keywords used. These words were
searched and identified in the researchers’ profiles, and
eligibility criteria applied (Table 1) in other relevant
websites, both in French and English.

Researchers
We consulted the websites of: 1) all eight universities
with a rehabilitation department (occupational therapy,
physical therapy, nursing, psychology, kinesiology, chiro-
practic, speech therapy and audiology) across the prov-
ince of Quebec (Additional file 2); 2) seven major
physical rehabilitation research centers serving various
patient populations (Additional file 3); and 3) the major
provincial research funding organizations. Researchers
who met the eligibility criteria were identified (Table 1).
We extracted the researcher’s health profession, research
affiliation, credentials, contact information, research
area/fields of interest, recent publications and the web-
site information.

The research group engaged in a two-round validation
process to identify the extent to which the identified re-
searchers were involved in KT research. Using the infor-
mation extracted from the public websites, each member
(n = 8) independently classified the KT researchers into
one of four ordinal categories describing the researcher’s
level of involvement in KT. Category 1 included re-
searchers working primarily in KT; most, if not all of
their research projects were related to KT and were
aimed at advancing KT research or implementation sci-
ence. For example, a researcher that had formal training
in KT (PhD, postdoctoral training in KT or courses in
KT) doing research on KT science was placed into cat-
egory 1. The second category included researchers doing
research in KT as well as in another (other) domain(s).
For example, a researcher in the second category would
be involved in KT activities as well as in primarily
rehabilitation-focused projects. The third category in-
cluded researchers involved mainly in other domains of
research but incorporating components of KT in their
projects. For example, a researcher developing clinical
practice guidelines in their main area of research would
be in the third category. Researchers in the fourth cat-
egory were excluded from the final environmental scan
because they did not meet eligibility criteria (e.g., in-
cluded key words in their description, but were doing

Table 1 Eligibility criteria for researchers and research projects
related to KT

Type of data Eligibility criteria

Researchers found online
(universities, research
centers and FRQS)

Inclusion criteria:
Researcher’s description, publication or
project include:
1) at least one term related to KTa

AND
2) has a field of work related to physical

disabilities
Exclusion criteria:
1) A person not eligible to receive

funding
2) Rehabilitation conducted in the field

of mental health
3) Research conducted in other

unrelated fields of research
4) Retired researcher
5) No identification of their work in KT

in their description

Projects funded by all funding
agencies and organizations
found online

Inclusion criteria:
1) Project’s description or title include at

least one term related to KTa

2) Description rely to KT
3) Field of work related to physical

disabilities
Exclusion criteria:
1) Rehabilitation conducted in the field

of mental health
2) Research conducted in other

unrelated fields of research
aFind full list of words searched in Additional file 1

Montpetit-Tourangeau et al. BMC Health Services Research (2020) 20:973 Page 3 of 10

KT research related to mental health). The categories
were developed by our team and informed by the KTA
framework [48]. All researchers integrating one or more
components of the KTA framework were considered in-
volved in KT research (categories one, two and three).

Funded research projects
We searched funding agencies’ and organizations’ web-
sites for KT funded projects. We also contacted (by
phone or email) key members of these agencies and or-
ganizations who were responsible for, or knowledgeable
about, the KT projects to identify other projects that
may not have been available on the websites. The search
strategies for the funding agencies are presented in
Additional file 4.
We collected the following information for all projects

funded between 2005 and 2015: the organization or
funding agency, the title, authors/researchers, target
audience of the research (e.g., for clinicians, graduate
students…), year, amount received and short summary.
Projects started and/or funded prior to 2005 were ex-
cluded as KT research during that time period was not
formally called “KT” in Canada (since publication of
seminal KT work and mandate to include KT in project
applications) [48].

Phase 2A: strategic planning
Based on the collective expertise of the research group
members in KT research in rehabilitation and drawing on
the preliminary results from the environmental scan (e.g.,
number of researchers involved in KT and percentage of
KT projects funded by funding agencies) (Additional file 5),
we developed a 5-year strategic plan to facilitate and sup-
port KT researchers in physical rehabilitation. Guided by
Holt et al’s framework (2015) of strategic planning [55],
we held six meetings and a two-day retreat (led by a group
member (AB) with expertise in strategic planning) to: a)
refine and approve the group’s mission, vision and goals;
b) identify the strategies (how we will reach the objectives)
and tactics/actions (what we will do and who will lead the
intervention to implement the strategies) to achieve the
goals, and metrics to assess the tactics/actions; c) plan for
the tactics/actions execution; and d) establish a prelimin-
ary timeline for the implementation of the strategic plan.
We used an iterative brainstorming approach to systemat-
ically generate strategies and related tactics/actions and
elaborate the metrics and action plan. A consensus was
then established to decide on the inclusion of activities in
the strategic plan.
Following the series of team meetings, we used a 3-

round modified Delphi method with our team members
to obtain a consensus on the priority rankings for all
strategies [56, 57]. The Delphi approach was used to fa-
cilitate collaborative work within the research team.

Strategies were highly ranked if they could have a major
impact on the mission of the KT-SIRQ. The first round
consisted of each group member individually ranking
the strategies by priority. The frequency of answers was
calculated for every statement and a table was prepared
with a summary of the findings from the first round, in-
cluding a space for the second-round ranking. We en-
gaged in a second-round seeking at least 80% consensus
on all items. A third round was conducted via a face-to-
face meeting in order to achieve final consensus.
For each strategy, individuals or organizations that

could potentially be involved in leading the strategy were
considered and proposed, and a timeframe and an esti-
mation of the magnitude of required resources (e.g.,
budget, research personnel) needed for the execution of
the corresponding tactics or actions were identified.

Phase 2B: expert consultation and review of the strategic
plan
As suggested in the Holt and al’s framework [55], we
consulted nine provincial and national experts (re-
searchers and stakeholders (research advisors and co-
ordinators)) in the field of KT to review the strategic
plan for consistency and applicability.). The goal was
to obtain feedback that would help ensure that the
objectives and plan were aligned with current and fu-
ture priorities in KT research in rehabilitation, and
that the strategic plan was consistent and realistic.
These experts from diverse settings (KT research
groups (e.g., province-based subgroups of the Strat-
egies for Patient Oriented Research (SPOR) Unit) and
health related organizations (e.g., National Institute of
Excellence in Health and Social Services) were re-
searchers, managers and public health coordinators
involved in KT. Experts were provided with an execu-
tive summary, a first complete version of the strategic
plan, and a list of five open-ended questions (Add-
itional file 6). Comments gathered through the con-
sultation with the experts provided external validation
of the strategic plan. All the comments were gathered
in a single document, analyzed and addressed an-
onymously. The feedback was used to refine the stra-
tegic plan.

Results
Phase 1: environmental scan
Researchers
We identified 123 researchers of which 64 matched
the eligibility criteria after group consensus. The 64
researchers had a range of clinical and research train-
ing and were found across eight universities, seven re-
search centers and one organization (i.e. Fonds de
recherche du Québec – FRQ). Figure 1 illustrates the
number and types of researchers that were identified

Montpetit-Tourangeau et al. BMC Health Services Research (2020) 20:973 Page 4 of 10

and classified by the group members (four levels of
classification – see description above).

Research projects
For the 10-year period between 2005 and 2015, a total of
96 projects funded by eight of the 14 different agencies
met the eligibility criteria (Additional file 7). One

provincial network in rehabilitation, funded a total of
14.4% of the projects related to KT in rehabilitation.

Phase 2A: strategic planning
The KT-SIRQ’s group mission, vision, four goals, nine
related strategies (2–3 per goal) ranked by order of pri-
ority and 42 corresponding tactics or actions (3–10 per

Fig. 1 KT researchers selection flow diagram

Fig. 2 Five-year preliminary roadmap

Montpetit-Tourangeau et al. BMC Health Services Research (2020) 20:973 Page 5 of 10

strategy) were elaborated. A 5-year preliminary timeline
that underpins the strategic plan was also developed
(Fig. 2). The strategic plan highlights the need to im-
prove access to resources supporting the KT process;
this would meet the need for guidance and structure in
KT projects for researchers, students, postdoctoral fel-
lows and stakeholders.

Phase 2B: expert consultation and review of the strategic
plan
Seven of the nine experts invited to review the strategic
plan returned their feedback on whether the initiative
aimed to build capacity in KT research or in KT more
broadly; preliminary timelines for the proposed activities;
the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of the
strategic plan; the population targeted for each strategy;
targeted leaders and a team for each strategy; and collab-
orations with existing initiatives in KT. We incorporated
the comments and returned a revised version to group
members for feedback and final approval. The final ver-
sion of the strategic plan was completed after phases 2A
and 2B (Additional file 8). Table 2 presents a summary
of the strategic plan.

Moving forward from the strategic plan, preliminary
outcomes
The strategies and actions elaborated in the strategic
plan are being implemented according to the priorities
established in the strategic plan, and each research
group member is leading a strategy. The preliminary
timeline was modified based on the funding and re-
sources available for implementation of specific strat-
egies. Our group also includes graduate students and
post-doctoral fellows involved in ongoing projects. Three
of the nine strategies have begun to be actively imple-
mented by our group:

Strategy 1A: increase access to knowledge in KT
Consistent with our strategic plan and in collaboration
with the federally funded KT provincial Component of
the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
SPOR Unit, we developed and held the first ever provin-
cial KT training program to increase capacity in KT.
The KT Component of the SPOR Unit aims to identify
KT resources in healthcare and social services, and to
support the creation and development of training pro-
grams in KT. Thirty-eight individuals (or researchers
(n = 6), post-doctoral fellows (n = 7), graduate students
(n = 13), master students (n = 4), research assistants (n =
2) and stakeholders such as clinicians, managers and re-
search coordinators) from nine universities and seven
clinical milieus participated in the first edition (2018) of
the training program. The objectives of the 3-day train-
ing program were to: 1) Justify the importance of plan-
ning KT in research studies; 2) Identify and carry out
effective and optimal KT strategies and methods in re-
search projects and clinical projects including research
on KT and implementation science; 3) Describe the
steps to implement a KT plan; and 4) Create a KT plan
for a grant application or a research project. Policy
makers and patients were invited but were not
represented.

Strategy 2A: identify and engage relevant stakeholders and
their needs and priorities
Drawing from the environmental scan, we conducted a
survey with identified researchers and stakeholders. Indi-
vidual interviews and a focus groups with subsets of re-
searchers working in rehabilitation are being held to
identify needs and priorities in KT research. This on-
going study will identify the nature of their research, and
the perceived barriers and facilitators to conducting KT
research. Findings should help clarify both the priorities
of individuals involved in KT across the province and
their perceived need for support from our group.
Thirty-seven individuals (researchers (n = 33) and

stakeholders (n = 4)) involved in KT research and/or ac-
tivities in physical disabilities in the province completed

Table 2 Strategic plan summary

Strategic plan

Vision: To enhance the health of individuals with physical disabilities in
Quebec by advancing KT research in rehabilitation science.
Mission: To build capacity and promote collaborative KT research in
rehabilitation to improve the delivery of services and ultimately the
health and wellbeing of individuals with physical disabilities.

Goals Strategies

1. Build capacity in KT research and
implementation and promote
networking

A. Increase access to knowledge in
KT

B. Promoting KT research and
implementation

C. Influence funding opportunities

2. Identify and engage relevant
stakeholders (e.g., consumers of
rehabilitation services, service
providers, organizations, decision
makers) to support the mission
of the Qc KT Rehab Strat
Initiative

A. Identify and engage relevant
stakeholders and their needs
and priorities

B. Create a sustainability plan for
KT-SIRQ

3. Be a catalyst for the creation,
application and evaluation of
innovative and effective KT for
individuals with physical
disabilities

A. Support the continuous
implementation of evaluation
and feedback of interventions
and outcomes

B. Promote sustainability of
practice change

4. Advance KT research in
rehabilitation

A. Identify gaps in KT research in
rehabilitation

B. Promote the use of rigorous
methods in KT research in
rehabilitation

Montpetit-Tourangeau et al. BMC Health Services Research (2020) 20:973 Page 6 of 10

the survey of the 94 invited to participate. In comple-
mentarity with the environmental scan, the survey re-
vealed that researchers are primarily involved in KT
activities in their main area of research and less than
20% are primarily focused on KT research. Though re-
spondents were involved in various components of the
KT process (e.g. knowledge syntheses, identification of
EBP gaps and identification of barriers and facilitators to
knowledge use) most were involved in knowledge syn-
theses (n = 22) and guidelines (n = 13), and the develop-
ment of KT interventions (n = 16) rather than on
evaluation (n = 12) or sustainability (n = 9) of KT
strategies.

Strategy 4A: identify gaps in KT research in rehabilitation
In parallel with these two projects, we are currently in
the process of conducting an overview of systematic re-
views to answer the following research question. In the
context of health care, what is the impact of implementa-
tion strategies, when compared to none or other imple-
mentation strategies, to increase the application of
evidence-based knowledge tools? This synthesis will clas-
sify effective implementation strategies according to par-
ticipants’ characteristics, health care domains and
contexts to guide decision-making on the best ways to
transfer evidence into clinical practice. Recommenda-
tions stemming from this review should enhance the use
of KT methods and ultimately increase the quality of KT
research in rehabilitation.

Discussion
The purpose of this paper was to present the process and
methods used to develop a strategic plan for an initiative
that supports KT researchers in the rehabilitation of indi-
viduals with physical disabilities. This was accomplished
through an environmental scan of KT researchers and re-
search projects related to KT in the field and a consult-
ation with key KT experts. We report on the first
outcomes of the implementation of the strategic plan.
Based on the findings from the environmental scan,

most of the researchers (76,6% of the researchers identi-
fied), were only partially involved in KT activities (cat-
egory #3). Little emphasis from researchers seems to be
made on advancing KT research or implementation sci-
ence, defined as research aimed at improving methods
to better use evidence in healthcare practices and pol-
icies (category #1, 6,2%) [58]. The same observation was
made for the research projects as only very few of the re-
search projects seem to incorporate one component of
the KTA framework. Hence, it appears that researchers
in physical rehabilitation seldom focus on the action
cycle component of the KTA framework or employ inte-
grated KT approaches as proposed by the Canadian In-
stitute of Health Research (CIHR) [59]. Indeed, the

majority of researchers in physical rehabilitation focus
primarily on knowledge creation (e.g. development of
practice guidelines) or end-of-grant KT projects with a
dissemination plan. On their own, such projects are in-
sufficient to affect outcomes on clinical practices [60].
Even though knowledge creation-type of research may
not always lead to findings which can be immediately
implemented in the clinical settings [61], additional at-
tention should be given to the relevance of the research
produced and to buy-in from relevant stakeholders to
avoid widening the research-practice gap and increase
the significance of research [59]. Integrated KT projects
incorporating KT components early in the research
process may increase with the growing emphasis on EBP
in rehabilitation [62], stakeholder engagement in re-
search [63], mounting pressure from local and federal
funding agencies for researchers to include an imple-
mentation plan in grant proposals [59], and the increas-
ing number of new investigators trained in KT [64]. For
example, KT is part of the priority mandates for several
major health funding agencies in in Canada (e.g., Canad-
ian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) [59].
The large number of institutions and organizations in-

terested in reducing research-practice gaps are other ex-
amples of the growing interest in KT and the
importance of coordinating future KT research to
optimize EBP. Previous research and this environmental
scan further support the need to establish a structure
that would facilitate and help advance KT research in re-
habilitation [41]. By building capacity in KT research,
identifying and engaging stakeholders, being a catalyst
for KT and advancing KT research, our group will target
essential aspects aiming to address sub-optimal use of
robust methods in KT research. Using these strategies,
and as research evidence in rehabilitation continues to
grow, our aim is to facilitate and help coordina

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NARRATIVES OF STAKEHOLDERS UNDER
THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE STRATEGY AS
SOCIAL PRACTICE

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
Resources and Entrepreneurial Development, doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

JOSÉ B. S. NETO1

https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4518-1960

JACQUELAINE F. BORGES2

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8550-8329

To cite this paper: Souza Neto, J. B., & Borges, J. F. (2019). Narratives of stakeholders under the
perspective of the strategy the social practice. Revista de Administração Mackenzie, 20(1). doi:10.1590/
1678-6971/eRAMR190118

Submission: June 12, 2018. Acceptance: July 31, 2018.

1 Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.
2 Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.

2

José B. S. Neto, Jacquelaine F. Borges

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The paper is driven by the following question: how do interest
group narratives contribute to the dialogue between the perspective of
strategy as a practice and the stakeholder theory? The objective is to
analyze the changes, permanent and tensions in the narratives of the
stakeholders, seen the strategic practices, in the context of mining.
Originality/value: Strategy as a social practice concerns the relationships
between organizations, individuals and society in search of coexistence.
This study establishes a dialogue between strategy as a social practice
and the political perspective of the stakeholders, considering that they
interact in networks, seeking the creation of value from mutuality.
Design/methodology/approach: Field research was conducted in a
qualitative and longitudinal approach. Data collection used to document
research techniques in notes and videos of public hearings, newspaper
research and interviews.
Findings: The results show narrative interactions of six interest groups:
entrepreneurial organizations, public authority, education, environment,
residents of the area of implantation and the productive sector. The
result suggests a relevant role of relational tensions as elements that
restrict and enable changes and permanent and indicate the dynamic
nature of intra and intergroup interactions of stakeholders. The proposed
theoretical dialogue extends the field of strategic studies, in a postmodern
dimension, by establishing a dialogue with the political side of
stakeholder action as an alternative to the traditional functionalist
perspective in the field.

KEYwORDS

Strategy as practice. Stakeholder Theory. Narrative research. Mining
sector. Relational tension.

Narratives of stakeholders under the perspective of the strategy as social practice

3

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

1. INTRODUCTION

The State of Minas Gerais is considered by the Brazilian Mining Institute
(IBRAM) (2015) as the most relevant to the mining industry. Minas Gerais
moves 53% of the mineral sector. Of the 100 largest mineral extraction mines,
40 are in that state. Of the ten largest mining cities of Brazil, seven are in
Minas Gerais. Of the 853 municipalities of Minas Gerais (Brazilian Institute
of Geography and Statistics [IBGE], 2010), 400 have mineral extraction
activities, being the largest producer of gold, iron and phosphate of the
country, and the largest producer of niobium in the world (IBRAM, 2015).

This phenomenon also occurs with phosphate mining, a central component
for the production of fertilizers, which in turn, is crucial and strategic for the
increase of productivity in Brazilian agricultural activity and its economic
support. According to the National Department of Mineral Production
(DNPM) (2016), which was transformed into the National Mining Agency in
2017, the phosphate mining, the basis for fertilizer production, is insufficient
to meet the internal demand of the country. The report highlights the deposits
that may come into operation, among these, “one of the most promising is
from Patrocínio in Minas Gerais” (DNPM, 2016, p. 71). Therefore, the theme
of this research is relevant to the State of Minas Gerais and Brazil.

The process of deploying a mineral extraction company involves various
social interactions between various individuals and interest groups. As an
economic and social activity, mining enables the formation of enterprises
that generate expectations, mobilize interests and meet the needs of various
stakeholders: entrepreneurs, environmentalists, suppliers of goods and
services, representatives of the Government, students and members of
the productive sector. These groups are a fundamental dimension of the
implementation of an enterprise in the mining sector.

This article is driven by the following question: How do the narratives
of interest groups contribute to the dialogue between the perspective of
strategy as a practice and the theory of stakeholders? The goal is to analyze
the changes, the permanence and the tensions in narratives of the
stakeholders, seen as strategic practices in the deployment process of a
phosphate mining plant. Stakeholders are defined as those that influence or
are influenced by a particular organization in the pursuit of their goals
(Freeman, 1984; Donaldson & Preston, 1995; Clarkson, 1995). This study
establishes a dialogue between strategy as a social practice and a political
perspective of stakeholders, since strategy as a social practice, regards the

4

José B. S. Neto, Jacquelaine F. Borges

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

relations between organizations, individuals and society in search of their
coexistence.

The stakeholders may be perceived differently by organizations,
depending on how they interact, according to Bridoux and Stoelhorst (2014).
In a socio-political approach of the stakeholders, Sachs and Rühli (2011)
defend mutual value creation through network actions. Bonnafous-Boucher
and Rendtorff (2016) establish a relationship between the business world and
public life, making a civil society a stakeholder society, given the complexity
of the environmental organizations, including the economic and legal, social,
political, cultural and ecological aspects.

The concepts of strategy as a practice and strategic practices used in
this article originate from the perspective of strategy as practice (ECP)
(Jarzabkowsky, 2003, 2004; Whittington, 1996, 2003, 2006) and on the
assumption that the dynamic interactions of interest groups and their
practices can also exert influence on the results of a given phenomenon
(Dias, Rossetto & Marinho, 2017).

The dialogue between these two perspectives – strategy as a social
practice and stakeholders – is conducted as a narrative. For Jones and Wicks
(1999), narratives relate to what organizations should do from an ethical
perspective and the instruments they use to achieve their goals. The
importance of language and narratives in organizations is analyzed by
Oliveira and Bulgacov (2013). Brown and Thompson (2013) claim that
there is a natural relationship between narrative and strategy as a practice.
Barros and Carrieri (2015) claim that studies of narratives based on history
are important, as these can enhance the visibility of practices based on the
experiences of the practitioners. Vaara, Sonenshein, and Boje (2016) argue
that the narrative is able to promote stability or change in organizations.
From the epistemological and methodological point of view, Clandinin and
Connelly (2000) show that the narrative is interested in the lives of people,
the way lives interact with other lives and develop the experiences.

In three distinct sections below, each of the three themes will be
addressed: strategy as a practice, interest groups (stakeholders) and
narratives. The methodological procedures are described in their own
section. The next section describes and analyzes the results of the research
of the narratives of the stakeholder interactions in the process of deploying
a phosphate mining plant, located in the municipality of Patrocínio, in Minas
Gerais. The paper ends with a section of conclusions and implications of the
research.

Narratives of stakeholders under the perspective of the strategy as social practice

5

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

2. THE PERSPECTIVE OF STRATEGY AS A SOCIAL
PRACTICE

In the early 2000s, studies that embraced and helped to spread the
concept of SAP (Strategy-as-Practice), like Johnson, Melin and Whittington’s
(2003), proposed the need for research in strategy to dedicate more attention
to the day-to-day activities of organizations, giving emphasis on details,
which were called micro activities. For Wilson and Jarzabkowski (2004), the
traditional perspective of strategy is insufficient and limited if what is
desired is to understand how strategy arises and how it is put into practice
by its practitioners in the organizational environment.

When the strategy is not widespread in the structure and people do not
have access to it, that might promote contradictions whose mediation
contributes to change, says Jarzabkowski (2003). These two aspects,
permanences and changes, are important themes in the SAP universe, which
Jarzabkowski (2004) referred to as recursion and adaptation, and assigned
factors that favor permanences and changes (Figure 2.1).

Figure 2.1

FACTORS THAT FAVOR PERmANENCES AND CHANGES

Contexts
Recursive Factors that favor

permanences
Adaptive Factors that

favor changes

Macro
Context

Completely institutionalized structures;
Dominant social structures;
Stable Economic and normative
regulation;
Stable competition.

Markets with rapid growth;
Saturated or mature markets;
Institutionalized social structures;
Pluralism in social structures;
Changes in economic and social
regulation and standards;
High competition.

Micro
Context

Highly political;
Fragmented and discrete subcultures;
Homogeneous communities;
Unique and strong culture;
Dominant logic;
Bureaucratic, specialized, hierarchical
and structure;
A strategy built on the top-down model;
Strong operating routines;
Low absorption capacity.

Several practice communities;
Social interaction between communities;
Entrepreneurship;
Domestic investment initiatives;
Peripheral involvement strategies;
Distribution and transfer of knowledge;
Non-hierarchical, cellular and networked
structures;
Structures based on flexibility and
change codes (patch)

(continue)

6

José B. S. Neto, Jacquelaine F. Borges

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

Contexts
Recursive Factors that favor

permanences
Adaptive Factors that

favor changes

Actor
perception

Assimilation narrow structures;
Reflective capacity low;
Accommodation zone of restricted
interest;
Skills, abilities and knowledge
base low.

Wide assimilation structures;
High reflective capacity;
Accommodation area of broad interests;
The basis of competencies, skills and
vast knowledge.

Source: Adapted from Jarzabkowski (2004, p. 539).

SAP addresses the interactions between people in a given context and
how the strategy is built. For Chia and MacKay (2007) and Chia and Rasche
(2010), SAP is built as social activity and it reorients strategy for the practices
developed by the actors, what they do, how they communicate, and how
they use their competence in favor of the goals of the organization.

One of the key elements for understanding SAP is the integration
between practice, praxis and practitioners. As presented by Whittington
(2006), practitioners are strategists who “develop, shape and run” strategy,
which may be inside or out of the Organization as external consultants,
advisers and what the author calls strategy “gurus” (p. 619). According to
Jarzabkowski and Spee (2009), praxis is defined as a flow of activity that
interconnects the micro-actions of individuals and groups with broader
institutions in which these actions are located and to which they contribute.
The basis and references of the praxis are the organization’s practices, which
are the routines that may or may not be institutionalized.

Key elements for SAP are strategizing and organizing. For Walter and
Ahmed (2011), strategizing regards the activities of various actors and the
way in which these activities are carried out. In different, dependent and
independent ways (Light & Walter, 2015), strategizing refers to the action
of building strategic practices, and organizing refers to the action of building
the organization as a whole, its goals, interests and image. Strategizing and
organizing emphasize movement.

Regarding pluralistic contexts, which mark the occurrence of SAP in
complex environments, Denis, Langley and Rouleau (2007), Jarzabkowski,
Lê, and Van de Ven (2013), Pascucci and Meyer (2013) denounce the
implications to strategy the moment intentions become actions. For these

Figure 2.1 (conclusion)

FACTORS THAT FAVOR PERmANENCES AND CHANGES

Narratives of stakeholders under the perspective of the strategy as social practice

7

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

authors, in complex and pluralistic environments, the cognitive elements of
each of the practitioners are crucial to the construction of strategy, so
ambiguity and difficulty of consensus press organizing and strategizing.

The open concept of strategy considers aspects comprehensively, which
accommodates the experiences and interactions among these practitioners,
and is called by Hautz, Seidl, and Whittington (2016) Open Strategy, defined
as the open movement of strategy that promises to increase transparency
and inclusion, involving stakeholders both internal and external to the
organization.

3. THE STAKEHOLDERS PERSPECTIVE: FROM
FUNCTIONALISM TO A POLITICAL CONCEPT

In the field of studies on stakeholders, a functionalist concept emerged
in the early 1980s. According to Freeman (1984) and Freeman, Harrison,
Wicks, Parmar and De Colle (2010), this theory was designed to help
organizations solve three problems: 1. The generation and exchange of
values; 2. Better understand the relationship between ethics and capitalism
in organizations; and 3. Help managers change their perceptions about the
creation of value and ethics in changing environments. Savage, Nix,
Whitehead and Blair (1991), Mitchell, Agle and Wood (1997) and Macharia,
Alves and Raposo (2012), in their time, classify stakeholders differently but
regard them relevant to organizations and deserving their consideration.

The way in which interest groups may be perceived by the organizations
is determined by how they interact, according to Bridoux and Stoelhorst
(2014). Their interactions may be perceived as reciprocal or motivated by
self-interest. The fair approach is the beacon used by the authors for this
analysis of reciprocity, while the self-expansion approach is used in dealing
with those stakeholders with high bargaining power.

In this respect, Bonnafous-Boucher and Rendtorff (2016) argue that the
principle of the theory of stakeholders is the same as that of civil society, i.e.,
individuals seek primarily their own well-being and the satisfaction of their
needs. According to these authors, the scope of these interests is in line with
the common good and that is why they are mediated by the interests of the
collective. The individual interest must coexist with the collective interest.
This occurs through the institutionalization of interests, or through the
formation of groups (of interest) that are governed by internal rules and
legality (Bonnafous-Boucher & Rendtorff, 2016).

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José B. S. Neto, Jacquelaine F. Borges

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

The prospect of generating value for organizations is latent in the
traditional view of the theory of stakeholders, as formulated by Freeman
(1984) and Freeman et al. (2010), putting the organization at the center of
the activities. A contribution of this theory in the field of social and political
philosophy has not been explored, as argue Bonnafous-Boucher and
Rendtorff (2016), for whom “the construction of public life, the common
good, the art of living together has no center and, if in fact there is such a
center, it has no nothing to do with the economic life “(p. 53).

Organizations are not able to cater to all stakeholders, and so they need
to negotiate, generating tension. Bonnafous-Boucher and Rendtorff (2016)
argue that a spread of interests of the groups is difficult to identify, as well
as their influence and needs in a global context; such aspect competes to
maintain conflicts between stakeholders. This approach differs from the
traditional functionalist approach, advocated by Freeman (1984) and
Freeman et al. (2010).

A political perspective of the theory of stakeholders opposes a
functionalist approach, strongly based on economic assumptions and the
unique role of the stakeholders to the economic performance of the company.
As advocate Sachs and Rühli (2011), a difference of the political perspective
is the focus on mutuality which ensures that values are created with and for
stakeholders, diverging from the position of value created solely on the basis
of economic purposes, as a capital return.

In a social and political perspective of the theory of stakeholders, in
contrast to an economic perspective, the groups and their representatives do
not have as an exclusive focus the overcoming or elimination of barriers in
their contexts of action for the achievement of their economic interests. The
stakeholders mobilize other experiences, in addition to the economic one,
considering the dynamism of goals, expectations and needs of the networks
with whom they interface and act in different networks simultaneously. In
this way, a network of stakeholders, rather than being perceived as, for
example, competitors, can be assumed to be a contributor network, no
longer perceived as restricting their practices to an extended position in the
generation of value (Sachs & Rühli, 2011).

4. NARRATIVES SEEN AS STRATEGIC PRACTICES AND
STAKEHOLDERS: A DIALOGUE

In a study of the narrative as an epistemological and methodological
issue, Clandinin and Connelly (2000) examine the tensions, the confrontation

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between the narrative thinking and the dominant narrative, and the border
that exposes tension points as: 1. Temporality – everything has a past, a
present and, implicitly, a future; 2. People – people are in a continuous
process of change and are relevant to the phenomenon that is observed;
3. The action – seen here as a narrative symbol; and 4. The certainties –
events in a narrative perspective can always have another meaning. All these
elements of tension are interconnected and immersed in 5. Contexts that
are crucial to giving meaning to each of the individuals or groups.

In organizational studies and in the field of strategy, the narrative is the
means by which organizations can be understood, says Czarniawska (2007).
The narratives allow “understanding of how humans build sense, building
experience, knowledge and identity ”, claim Fenton and Langley (2011,
p. 1174). The strategy is a process of the relationship of power that is
exercised “in an ambiguous and contradictory way; while it supports, it
frustrates” (McCabe, 2009, p. 152). Ambiguity is inherent to the management
process and contravenes clarity because when managers manifest themselves
ambiguously, they avoid resistance giving more power of interpretation to
their interlocutor, whereas if they are clearer, they become more responsible
for the strategy (McCabe, 2009).

The existence of a natural relationship between narrative and strategy as
practice is proposed and analyzed by Brown and Thompson (2013). The
authors identify and analyze two reasons for this study: polyphony and
equivocality. Polyphony refers to the dissonance in the understanding and
dissemination of the key strategies of the organization; and equivocality, or
ability to generate misunderstandings, is present in complex relationships
generated by strategy as a social practice. The approach of the study of
narrative allows those nuances to be identified. Brown and Thompson
(2013) understand that strategies are reflections of power and are through
the power that dominant strategies can be replicated.

Studies of narratives based on history can broaden the visibility of
practices based on the experiences of practitioners, which Barros and Carrieri
(2015) claim to be important and call ordinary management. The narrative
is able to promote stability or change in organizations, argue Vaara et al.
(2016, p. 17). These authors recognize that this concept connects to
polyphony and multiple interpretations, proposed by Brown and Thompson
(2013). Vaara et al. (2016) realize that, given the complexity of change, a
single narrative would not be able to understand all of its nuances.

Human action unveils a strategy as a social practice and it is through
the narratives that this happens, because they enable the understanding of
polyphony, that the strategy in this approach brings out, claim Rese, Kuabara,

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José B. S. Neto, Jacquelaine F. Borges

ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

Villar and Ferreira (2017). These authors explore the issue of sensemaking
(construction of meaning) and sensegiving (interpretation of the meaning)
as the construction of meaning mediated by the narratives of the practitioners.

In Figure 4.1, we present a proposal for a set of attributes of the narratives
(one to eight). In a given context (6), stakeholders/practitioners (1) spark
the narratives (4) when interacting (5) in defense of their interests or in the
fulfillment of their strategic practices. This interaction can generate tensions
through ambiguity (3), polyphony and equivocality (7). The manifestations
of power (2) can occur in an attempt to establish a dominant narrative, be it
to promote change or permanence. The narratives are also generated in the
relations between the groups/practitioners with society (8) from a political
perspective.

In the political perspective of stakeholders, analyzed by Bonnafous-
Boucher and Rendtorff (2016), the approach of the theory of stakeholders
interfacing with strategy allows practitioners the recognition of those
involved as well as their needs, their interests and their (pre)dispositions,
facilitating the identification of opportunities for the generation of higher
value, with the creation of interaction networks (Sachs & Rühli, 2011),
which triggers the process of negotiation by means of licenses.

Figure 4.1

DIALOG BETwEEN STRATEGY AS PRACTICE AND A POLITICAL
PERSPECTIVE OF STAKEHOLDERS

Items/
Identification

Narrative Attributes
Political perspective of

stakeholders
Strategy as Practice

1 Narrative actors Stakeholders: internal and
external groups and
individuals.
Act in defense of their
interests.

Practitioners: individuals and
intra-organizational and
non-organizational groups.
Experience strategic
practices.

2 Power to convince
and be convinced

Influence.
Enforce their prerogatives
to achieve their interests.
Motivations

Practice.
Acts as a referential source
that limits and enables. The
diffusion of power
contributes to ambiguity.

3 Ambiguity Similarities and differences
in motivations, resource
property and perceptions
(clear or ambiguous) of
other groups.

Multidimensionality of
practices: behavioral,
cognitive, moral, cultural,
political, economic, etc.

(continue)

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ISSN 1678-6971 (electronic version) • RAM, São Paulo, 20(1), eRAMR190118, 2019
doi:10.1590/1678-6971/eRAMR190118

Items/
Identification

Narrative Attributes
Political perspective of

stakeholders
Strategy as Practice

4 Triggers the narrative Multiple goals, interests and
needs.

Relational interactions,
praxis.

5 Interactions and
conflicts

Unilateral vision: internal
and external
Risk management and
benefits: to the extent that
the range of interests can
be affected.

Multidimensional vision:
micro and macro.
Relational tensions: the
practices can change the