• Home

Language Arts

Earth Day

Name:

Date:

Questions

Your answers

1. According to an organization called Feeding America, “Each year, 108 billion pounds of food is wasted in the United States. That equates to 130 billion meals and more than $408 billion in food thrown away each year. Shockingly, nearly 40% of all food in America is wasted.”

After reading the quotes above, write a reflection of at least 4 sentences. Was there any information that surprised you? What? Was there information you already knew? Where did you learn it from?

Reflection:

2. Research the answers to the following:

· In what year was Earth Day first founded?

· In what year did it go global?

3. Read
this short article
called, “Fact Sheet: How Much Disposable Plastic We Use”. Look at bullet points 1-8. List 5 different sources of plastic that is polluting our planet.

·

·

·

·

·

4. Look through
this page
: “52 Ways to Invest In Our Planet”. Make a list of 5 things that YOU can do to make a difference.

·

·

·

·

·

5. Out of everything you have learned today about Earth Day, what will you take away? How can you and your family members make changes to help our Earth? Connect this information with what you learned earlier in the unit about humans being responsible for global climate change. Write a summary of at least 5 sentences in your own words.

Summary:

Language Arts

COMPREHENSION TOOLS Name:

Identify Central Idea

GRADE 6 Identify Central Idea 1 of 6©Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying permitted for classroom use.

TEXT A

Read the text, and
underline details that
support the central idea.
Then, complete the
activity on page 3.

DIRECTIONSThe First Women’s Rights
Convention

1 In 1848, a convention of historic importance took place in Seneca
Falls, New York. The small town was the site of the first women’s
rights convention. At the convention, people voted on a series of
proposals. One of them was that women should have the right to
vote. Many people at that time were opposed to this idea. But the
convention helped build support for women’s voting rights, which
eventually became the law of the land.

2 The idea for the convention began eight years earlier. In 1840,
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott were among a group of
women who went to London to attend the World Anti-Slavery
Convention. Once there, they were kept out of the conference
because they were women. So, the group decided to meet on their
own. Stanton and Mott agreed that another convention should be
held. That convention would address women’s rights. Eight years
passed before the two women achieved this goal. In 1848, Mott
was visiting her sister near Seneca Falls. Stanton was living there
at the time. Mott and Stanton met again. With three other
women, they agreed to plan a convention. Its purpose would be
“to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights
of women.”

3 Stanton agreed to write a Declaration of Sentiments. It would be
the basis for discussion at the meeting. She modeled her document
on the Declaration of Independence. That document said that “all
men are created equal.” Stanton wrote that “all men and women
are created equal.” She then listed eighteen injustices against
women. The Declaration of Independence aimed the same
number of charges at England’s king. Stanton also wrote eleven
resolutions. They pointed to areas where action should be taken
to correct injustices against women. The ninth resolution
proposed that women should have the right to vote.

proposals: plans to be
considered

resolutions: formal
statements voted on by
a group

COMPREHENSION TOOLS Name:

Identify Central Idea

GRADE 6 Identify Central Idea 2 of 6©Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying permitted for classroom use.

TEXT A

4 Three hundred people came to the convention in July of 1848.
Forty of them were men. Everyone present voted yes to all of
Stanton’s resolutions except the ninth one. Then Frederick
Douglass, who was formerly enslaved, spoke in favor of women
having the right to vote. He convinced the convention to pass the
resolution. One hundred women and men signed the declaration.
Many people criticized and made fun of the document and those
who signed it. But harsh words did not stop the cause for women’s
voting rights. The small convention had begun a big revolution.

5 The Seneca Falls Convention started women on a long pursuit for
the right to vote. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and
many others devoted their lives to the cause. Women finally won
the right to vote 72 years after the convention in 1920. Of all the
women who signed the convention’s Declaration of Sentiments,
only one lived long enough to exercise her right to vote.
But the Seneca Falls Convention made it possible for future
generations of women to vote and to pursue equality in other
areas as well.

devoted: dedicated yourself
to something

COMPREHENSION TOOLS Name:

Identify Central Idea

GRADE 6 Identify Central Idea 3 of 6©Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying permitted for classroom use.

Find Key Details
Record key details about how the Seneca Falls Convention helped women
gain voting rights.

ACTIVITY A

Central Idea

Detail

Detail

Detail

Detail Detail

COMPREHENSION TOOLS Name:

Identify Central Idea

GRADE 6 Identify Central Idea 4 of 6©Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying permitted for classroom use.

Gandhi: A Life of Peaceful
Protest

1 When Mohandas K. Gandhi was born in 1869, India was ruled
by Great Britain. When Gandhi died in 1948, India was an
independent nation. Gandhi devoted his life to Indian
independence. His commitment to peaceful protest was the
moral backbone of the movement to free India.

2 When Gandhi was a young man, he made a decision that would
change his life. He took a job in South Africa. The British ruled
parts of South Africa. Indians living there did not have the same
freedoms that white people had, simply because of their skin color.
This injustice moved Gandhi to action.

3 Shortly after moving to South Africa, Gandhi took a business trip.
He bought a first-class railroad ticket. At one stop, a white man
boarded the train. He insisted that Gandhi could not sit in the
first-class car because he was a “non-white.” Gandhi protested. He
showed his first-class ticket and refused to move. He was thrown
off the train. This prejudice that Gandhi faced inspired him to
win rights for Indians in South Africa.

4 During his twenty years in South Africa, Gandhi developed the
idea of peaceful protest. Some called it nonviolent resistance. This
principle guided Gandhi’s life. Gandhi believed that if people
disobeyed unjust laws without using violence, the lawmakers
would see the injustice of their laws. Truth and fairness would
sway the rulers and force them to change the laws.

5 In 1915, Gandhi returned to India to impart his program of
peaceful protest. For a year, he traveled throughout India. Gandhi
thought the people of India should make three improvements to
their society. First, Gandhi wanted Hindus and Muslims to find
ways to live together peacefully. Differences between the two
religious groups sometimes caused conf lict. Second, he wanted
better treatment for people who society unjustly considered to be
inferior. Third, Gandhi thought people should live simpler lives.
He urged them to learn to weave and to wear homespun cotton

prejudice: preferring one
group over another

impart: to tell

inferior: not as good as
something else

Read the text, and
underline repeated
words and ideas. Then,
complete the activity
on p. 6.

DIRECTIONS

TEXT B

COMPREHENSION TOOLS Name:

Identify Central Idea

GRADE 6 Identify Central Idea 5 of 6©Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying permitted for classroom use.

TEXT B

clothing. He spun cotton for his own clothing. In fact, the
spinning wheel became a symbol of his movement.

6 As part of their fight for freedom, Gandhi said that Indians
should not cooperate with their British rulers. He wanted Indians
to boycott, or reject, all things British. He did not want Indians to
use the British law courts. Gandhi also said Indians should not
send their children to British schools or take jobs in British
businesses. They should reject the type of clothing worn in
Britain, and even reject British cloth. Gandhi believed he could
unite Indians by encouraging them to be self-sufficient and proud
of their culture.

7 In 1930, Gandhi’s party called for complete independence from
Britain. Gandhi chose an unusual protest to support this demand.
He planned a march to the coast of the Arabian Sea. There, he
would pick up some salty sand. Why would Gandhi do this? At
that time, a law stated that only the British could make or sell salt.
The British taxed the salt heavily, which made it very expensive.
Because all humans need salt to live, even the poorest Indians had
to buy it. Breaking the salt law was one way to protest an unfair
law that kept India dependent on Britain.

8 In March 1930, Gandhi set out with 78 followers to walk 240 miles
to Dandi on the sea. Each day more people joined them. By the
end, there were 50,000 marchers. At Dandi, Gandhi picked up
some wet, salty sand. In the days that followed, people all over
India broke the law by drying seawater to make salt. Thousands,
including Gandhi, were put in jail. Yet, the peaceful protest
continued.

9 Britain saw little hope of holding on to India with force. Peaceful
protests had proved more powerful than violence. Finally, after
World War II, Britain agreed to grant India independence.

10 Even after India gained independence, Gandhi continued to work
toward making peace among the different groups of people in India.
But on January 30, 1948, Gandhi was killed by a man who disagreed
with his policies. Millions of people around the world mourned the
death of the man many called Mahatma, or the Great Soul. Gandhi’s
commitment to peaceful protest had earned him this name.

COMPREHENSION TOOLS Name:

Identify Central Idea

GRADE 6 Identify Central Idea 6 of 6©Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying permitted for classroom use.

Recognize Key Concepts
Identify and record details to describe key concepts in Gandhi: A Life of
Peaceful Protest.

ACTIVITY B

Key Concept Key Concept

Key Concept

Central Idea

peaceful/nonviolent protest

Language Arts

(t)
©

Sa
l I

dr
is

s;
(c

) ©
Ge

tty
Im

ag
es

10

James Berry (b. 1924) was raised in a tiny seaside village in
Jamaica. At seventeen, he left home for the United States. Unhappy
there, he returned to Jamaica four years later. Although Berry
moved to England in 1948, much of his writing focuses on his
early Caribbean home. He chooses to use the local language
of his childhood in his writing because he wants to express the
experience of living in his home village. Berry has won many
literary awards for his poetry and stories.

SETTING A PURPOSE As you read, pay attention to the clues
that help you understand the relationship between the boy
and his father. Write down any questions you have while
reading.

In the hours the hurricane stayed, its presence made everybody older. It made Mr. Bass see that not only people
and animals and certain valuables were of most importance to
be saved.

From its very buildup the hurricane meant to show it
was merciless, unstoppable, and, with its might, changed
landscapes.

All day the Jamaican sun didn’t come out. Then, ten
minutes before, there was a swift shower of rain that raced by
and was gone like some urgent messenger-rush of wind. And
again everything went back to that quiet, that unnatural quiet.
It was as if trees crouched quietly in fear. As if, too, birds knew
they should shut up. A thick and low black cloud had covered
the sky and shadowed everywhere, and made it seem like

Short Story by James BerryShort Story by James Berry

THE
BANANA
TREE

The Banana Tree 171

20

30

40

50

night was coming on. And the cloud deepened. Its deepening
spread more and more over the full stretch of the sea.

The doom-laden afternoon had the atmosphere of
Judgment Day1 for everybody in all the districts about.
Everybody knew the hour of disaster was near. Warnings
printed in bold lettering had been put up at post offices, police
stations, and school-yard entrances and in clear view on shop
walls in village squares.

Carrying children and belongings, people hurried in files
and in scattered groups, headed for the big, strong, and safe
community buildings. In Canerise Village, we headed for the
schoolroom. Loaded with bags and cases, with bundles and
lidded baskets, individuals carrying or leading an animal,
parents shrieking for children to stay at their heels, we arrived
there. And looking around, anyone would think the whole of
Canerise was here in this vast superbarn of a noisy chattering
schoolroom.

With violent gusts and squalls the storm broke. Great
rushes, huge bulky rushes, of wind struck the building
in heavy, repeated thuds, shaking it over and over and
carrying on.

Families were huddled together on the f loor. People sang,
sitting on benches, desks, anywhere there was room. Some
people knelt in loud prayer. Among the refugees’ noises a goat
bleated, a hen f luttered or cackled, a dog whined.

Mr. Jetro Bass was sitting on a soap box. His broad back
leaned on the blackboard against the wall. Mrs. Imogene Bass,
largely pregnant, looked a midget beside him. Their children
were sitting on the f loor. The eldest boy, Gustus, sat farthest
from his father. Altogether, the children’s heads made seven
different levels of height around the parents. Mr. Bass forced
a reassuring smile. His toothbrush mustache2 moved about a
little as he said, “The storm’s bad, chil’run. Really bad. But it’ll
blow off. It’ll spen’ itself out. It’ll kill itself.”

Except for Gustus’s, all the faces of the children turned up
with subdued fear and looked at their father as he spoke.

1 Judgment Day: a religious term for the end of the world.
2 toothbrush mustache (m≠s t́√sh´): a small, rectangular unshaven area of hair

on a man’s upper lip.

Collection 3172

60

70

80

“Das true wha’ Pappy say,” Mrs. Bass said. “The good Lord
won’ gi’ we more than we can bear.”

Mr. Bass looked at Gustus. He stretched fully through
the sitting children and put a lumpy, blistery hand—though a
huge hand—on the boy’s head, almost covering it. The boy’s
clear brown eyes looked straight and unblinkingly into his
father’s face. “Wha’s the matter, bwoy?” his dad asked.

He shook his head. “Nothin’, Pappy.”
“Wha’ mek you say nothin’? I sure somet’ing bodder

you, Gustus. You not a bwoy who frighten easy. Is not the
hurricane wha’ bodder you? Tell Pappy.”

“Is nothin’.”
“You’re a big bwoy now. Gustus—you nearly thirteen. You

strong. You very useful fo’ you age. You good as mi right han’.
I depen’ on you. But this afternoon—earlier—in the rush,
when we so well push to move befo’ storm broke, you couldn’
rememba a t’ing! Not one t’ing! Why so? Wha’ on you mind?
You harborin’ t’ings from me, Gustus?”

Gustus opened his mouth to speak but closed it again.
He knew his father was proud of how well he had grown.
To strengthen him, he had always given him “last milk”3
straight from the cow in the mornings. He was thankful.
But to him his strength was only proven in the number of
innings he could pitch for his cricket team. The boy’s lips
trembled. What’s the good of tellin’ when Pappy don’ like
cricket. He only get vex4 an’ say it’s an evil game for idle
hands! He twisted his head and looked away. “I’m harborin’
nothin’, Pappy.”

“Gustus . . . ”
At that moment a man called, “Mr. Bass!” He came up

quickly. “Got a hymnbook, Mr. Bass? We want you to lead
us singing.”

The people were sitting with bowed heads, humming
a song. As the repressed singing grew louder and louder, it
sounded mournful in the room. Mr. Bass shuff led, looking
around as if he wished to back out of the suggestion. But his
rich voice and singing leadership were too famous. Mrs. Bass

3 last milk: the last milk taken from milking a cow; this milk is usually the
richest in nutrients and taste.

4 vex: dialect for vexed, meaning “annoyed.”

repress
(r∆-pr≈s´) v. If you
repress something,
you hold it back or
try to stop it from
happening.

The Banana Tree 173

©
S

hu
tte

rs
to

ck

90

100

already had the hymnbook in her hand, and she pushed it at
her husband. He took it and began turning the leaves as he
moved toward the center of the room.

Immediately Mr. Bass was surrounded. He started with a
resounding chant over the heads of everybody. “Abide wid me;
fast fall the eventide . . . ” He joined the singing but broke off
to recite the next line. “The darkness deepen; Lord, wid me,
abide . . . ” Again, before the last long-drawn note faded from
the deeply stirred voices, Mr. Bass intoned musically, “When
odder helpers fail, and comfo’ts f lee . . . ”

In this manner he fired inspiration into the singing of
hymn after hymn. The congregation swelled their throats,
and their mixed voices filled the room, pleading to heaven
from the depths of their hearts. But the wind outside mocked
viciously. It screamed. It whistled. It smashed everywhere up.

Mrs. Bass had tightly closed her eyes, singing and swaying
in the center of the children who nestled around her. But
Gustus was by himself. He had his elbows on his knees and his
hands blocking his ears. He had his own worries.

mock
(m≤k) v. To mock
someone is to treat
them with scorn or
contempt.

Collection 3174

110

120

130

What’s the good of Pappy asking all those questions when
he treat him so bad? He’s the only one in the family without a
pair of shoes! Because he’s a big boy, he don’t need anyt’ing an’
must do all the work. He can’t stay at school in the evenings
an’ play cricket5 because there’s work to do at home. He can’t
have no outings with the other children because he has no
shoes. An’ now when he was to sell his bunch of bananas
an’ buy shoes so he can go out with his cricket team, the
hurricane is going to blow it down.

It was true: the root of the banana was his “navel string.”6
After his birth the umbilical cord7 was dressed with castor oil
and sprinkled with nutmeg and buried, with the banana tree
planted over it for him. When he was nine days old, the nana
midwife8 had taken him out into the open for the first time.
She had held the infant proudly and walked the twenty-five
yards that separated the house from the kitchen, and at the
back showed him his tree. “‘Memba when you grow up,” her
toothless mouth had said, “it’s you nable strings feedin’ you
tree, the same way it feed you from you mudder.”

Refuse from the kitchen made the plant f lourish out of
all proportion. But the rich soil around it was loose. Each
time the tree gave a shoot, the bunch would be too heavy for
the soil to support; so it crashed to the ground, crushing the
tender fruit. This time, determined that his banana must
reach the market, Gustus had supported his tree with eight
props. And as he watched it night and morning, it had become
very close to him. Often he had seriously thought of moving
his bed to its root.

Muff led cries, and the sound of blowing noses, now
mixed with the singing. Delayed impact of the disaster was
happening. Sobbing was everywhere. Quickly the atmosphere
became sodden with the wave of weeping outbursts.

5 cricket (kr∆k´∆t): an English sport similar to baseball.
6 navel string: a term for the umbilical cord.
7 umbilical cord (≠m-b∆l´∆-k∂l kôrd): the cord through which an unborn baby

(fetus) receives nourishment from its mother; a person’s navel is the place where
the cord was attached.

8 nana midwife: a woman who helps other women give birth and cares for
newborn children.

The Banana Tree 175

140

150

160

170

Mrs. Bass’s pregnant belly heaved. Her younger children
were upset and cried, “Mammy, Mammy, Mammy . . . ”

Realizing that his family, too, was overwhelmed by
the surrounding calamity, Mr. Bass bustled over to them.
Because their respect for him bordered on fear, his presence
quietened all immediately. He looked around. “Where’s
Gustus! Imogene . . . where’s Gustus!”

“He was ’ere, Pappy,” she replied, drying her eyes. “I dohn
know when he get up.”

Briskly Mr. Bass began combing the schoolroom to find
his boy. He asked; no one had seen Gustus. He called. There
was no answer. He tottered, lifting his heavy boots over heads,
fighting his way to the jalousie.9 He opened it, and his eyes
gleamed up and down the road but saw nothing of the boy. In
despair Mr. Bass gave one last thunderous shout: “Gustus!”
Only the wind sneered.

By this time Gustus was halfway on the mile journey to
their house. The lone figure in the raging wind and shin-deep
road f lood was tugging, snapping, and pitching branches out
of his path. His shirt was f luttering from his back like a boat
sail. And a leaf was fastened to his cheek. But the belligerent
wind was merciless. It bellowed into his ears and drummed a
deafening commotion. As he grimaced and covered his ears,
he was forcefully slapped against a coconut tree trunk that lay
across the road.

When his eyes opened, his round face was turned up to a
festered10 sky. Above the tormented trees a zinc sheet writhed,
twisted, and somersaulted in the tempestuous f lurry. Leaves
of all shapes and sizes were whirling and diving like attackers
around the zinc sheet. As Gustus turned to get up, a bullet
drop of rain struck his temple. He shook his head, held grimly
to the tree trunk, and struggled to his feet.

Where the road was clear, he edged along the bank. Once,
when the wind staggered him, he recovered with his legs wide
apart. Angrily he stretched out his hands with clenched fists
and shouted, “I almos’ hol’ you that time. . . . Come solid like
that again, an’ we fight like man an’ man!”

9 jalousie (j√l ∂́-s∏): a window blind or shutter with adjustable thin slats.
10 festered (f≈s t́∂rd): infected and irritated; diseased.

grimace
(gr∆m´∆s) v. If you
grimace, you twist
your face in an
unattractive way
because you are
unhappy, disgusted,
or in pain.

Collection 3176

180

190

200

210

When Gustus approached the river he had to cross, it was
f looded and blocked beyond recognition. Pressing his chest
against the gritty road bank, the boy closed his weary eyes
on the brink of the spating river. The wrecked footbridge had
become the harboring fort for all the debris, branches, and
monstrous tree trunks which the river swept along its course.
The river was still swelling. More accumulation arrived each
moment, ramming and pressing the bridge. Under pressure it
was cracking and shifting minutely toward a turbulent forty-
foot fall.

Gustus had seen it! A feeling of dismay paralyzed him,
reminding him of his foolish venture. He scraped his cheek
on the bank looking back. But how can he go back? He has
no strength to go back. His house is nearer than the school.
An’ Pappy will only strap him for nothin’ . . . for nothin’ . . .
no shoes, nothin’, when the hurricane is gone.

With trembling fingers he tied up the remnants of his
shirt. He made a bold step, and the wind half lifted him,
ducking him in the muddy f lood. He sank to his neck.
Floating leaves, sticks, coconut husks, dead ratbats, and all
manner of feathered creatures and refuse surrounded him.
Forest vines under the water entangled him. But he struggled
desperately until he clung to the laden bridge and climbed up
among leaf less branches.

His legs were bruised and bore deep scratches, but steadily
he moved up on the slimy pile. He felt like a man at sea, in the
heart of a storm, going up the mast of a ship. He rested his feet
on a smooth log that stuck to the water-splashed heap like a
black torso. As he strained up for another grip, the torso came
to life and leaped from under his feet. Swiftly sliding down, he
grimly clutched some brambles.

The urgency of getting across became more frightening,
and he gritted his teeth and dug his toes into the debris,
climbing with maddened determination. But a hard gust
of wind slammed the wreck, pinning him like a motionless
lizard. For a minute the boy was stuck there, panting, swelling
his naked ribs.

He stirred again and reached the top. He was sliding over a
breadfruit limb when a f lutter startled him. As he looked and
saw the clean-head crow and glassy-eyed owl close together,

venture
(v≈n ćh∂r) n.
A venture is a
dangerous, daring, or
poorly planned task
or activity.

bore
(bôr) v. (past tense
of bear) If you
say a person bore
something, you mean
they carried it or had
it on them; it is visible
in some way.

The Banana Tree 177

©
S

hu
tte

rs
to

ck

220

230

there was a powerful jolt. Gustus f lung himself into the air
and fell in the expanding water on the other side. When he
surfaced, the river had dumped the entire wreckage into the
gurgling gully. For once the wind helped. It blew him to land.

Gustus was in a daze when he reached his house. Mud
and rotten leaves covered his head and face, and blood caked
around a gash on his chin. He bent down, shielding himself
behind a tree stump whose white heart was a needly splinter,
murdered by the wind.

He could hardly recognize his yard. The terrorized trees
that stood were writhing in turmoil. Their thatched house had
collapsed like an open umbrella that was given a heavy blow.
He looked the other way and whispered, “Is still there! That’s a
miracle. . . . That’s a miracle.”

Dodging the wind, he staggered from tree to tree until
he got to his own tormented banana tree. Gustus hugged the
tree. “My nable string!” he cried. “My nable string! I know you
would stan’ up to it, I know you would.”

Collection 3178

240

250

260

270

The bones of the tree’s stalky leaves were broken, and the
wind lifted them and harassed them. And over Gustus’s head
the heavy fruit swayed and swayed. The props held the tree,
but they were squeaking and slipping. And around the plant
the roots stretched and trembled, gradually surfacing under
loose earth.

With the rags of his wet shirt f lying off his back, Gustus
was down busily on his knees, bracing, pushing, tightening
the props. One by one he was adjusting them until a heavy
rush of wind knocked him to the ground. A prop fell on him,
but he scrambled to his feet and looked up at the thirteen-
hand bunch of bananas. “My good tree,” he bawled, “hol’ you
fruit. . . . Keep it to you heart like a mudder savin’ her baby!
Don’t let the wicked wind t’row you to the groun’ . . . even if it
t’row me to the groun’. I will not leave you.”

But several attempts to replace the prop were futile. The
force of the wind against his weight was too much for him.
He thought of a rope to lash the tree to anything, but it was
difficult to make his way into the kitchen, which, separate
from the house, was still standing. The invisible hand of the
wind tugged, pushed, and forcefully restrained him. He got
down and crawled on his belly into the earth-f loor kitchen.
As he showed himself with the rope, the wind tossed him, like
washing on the line, against his tree.

The boy was hurt! He looked crucified against the tree.
The spike of the wind was slightly withdrawn. He fell, folded
on the ground. He lay there unconscious. And the wind had
no mercy for him. It shoved him, poked him, and molested his
clothes like muddy newspaper against the tree.

As darkness began to move in rapidly, the wind grew more
vicious and surged a mighty gust that struck the resisting
kitchen. It was heaved to the ground in a rubbled pile. The
brave wooden hut had been shielding the banana tree but in
its death fall missed it by inches. The wind charged again, and
the soft tree gurgled—the fruit was torn from it and plunged
to the ground.

The wind was less fierce when Mr. Bass and a searching
party arrived with lanterns. Because the bridge was
washed away, the hazardous roundabout journey had badly
impeded them.

Talks about safety were mockery to the anxious father.
Relentlessly he searched. In the darkness his great voice

The Banana Tree 179

280

290

300

COLLABORATIVE DISCUSSION Think about what happens at the
end of “The Banana Tree.” With a partner, discuss how the storm may
change the relationship between Gustus and his father. Use text
evidence to support your ideas.

echoed everywhere, calling for his boy. He was wrenching
and ripping through the house wreckage when suddenly he
vaguely remembered how the boy had been fussing with the
banana tree. Desperate, the man struggled from the ruins,
f lagging the lantern he carried.

The f lickering light above his head showed Mr. Bass the
forlorn and pitiful banana tree. There it stood, shivering
and twitching like a propped-up man with lacerated throat
and dismembered head. Half of the damaged fruit rested on
Gustus. The father hesitated. But when he saw a feeble wink
of the boy’s eyelids, he f lung himself to the ground. His bristly
chin rubbed the child’s face while his unsteady hand ran
all over his body. “Mi bwoy!” he murmured. “Mi hurricane
bwoy! The Good Lord save you. . . . Why you do this? Why
you do this?”

“I did want buy mi shoes, Pappy. I . . . I can’t go anywhere ’
cause I have no shoes. . . . I didn’ go to school outing at the
factory. I didn’ go to Government House. I didn’ go to Ol’ Fort
in town.”

Mr. Bass sank into the dirt and stripped himself of his
heavy boots. He was about to lace them to the boy’s feet when
the onlooking men prevented him. He tied the boots together
and threw them over his shoulder.

Gustus’s broken arm was strapped to his side as they
carried him away. Mr. Bass stroked his head and asked how he
felt. Only then grief swelled inside him and he wept.

Collection 3180

Language Arts

Name: Date:

Personification


Personification

is when you give human qualities to an animal, object or thing.

Find 3 examples of personification in
“The Banana Tree”
. Explain what is really meant by the example.

Example of personification

Explanation

Example A: Lightning danced across the sky.

Lightning cannot actually dance because it isn’t human. The sentence is just emphasizing how the lightning looked while it was moving across the sky.

Example B: The car complained as the key was roughly turned in its ignition.

1.

2.

3.

Constructed Response Questions

Answer the following questions using the R.A.C.E. Strategy. Be sure to EXPLAIN your answer citing evidence from the short story.

1. Is Mr. Bass a good or a bad father? Why or why not?

2. Do you agree with what Gustus did in going back for his tree? Why or why not?

Language Arts

4. Analyze: Reread paragraphs 1-3 and note details about setting and character traits. How is the historical setting related to the characters?

5. Draw Conclusions: Review the author’s use of language in paragraph 8. How do mood and characterization suggest the text’s theme?

6. Marigolds

Notice & Note: Review paragraphs 36-48. What does Lanesha realize about their situation? Explain how Lanesha uses this realization to help TaShon overcome his sense of hopelessness.

Language Arts

Compare and Contrast Texts

· Use the texts


“After the Hurricane”


and


“Ninth Ward”


to fill in the chart below then answer the questions. Make sure you go back and re-read sections. You may also listen to the


audio clip


on “Ninth Ward” on your phone or tablet (the part we’re reading stops at 7:33).

· If it helps you to first create a Venn Diagram like we did in class yesterday, you may do that on notebook paper.

·
This assignment is two pages long.

“After the Hurricane”

“Ninth Ward”

Key statements

1.

2.

1.

2.

Significant Events

1.

2.

1.

2.

Memorable Images

1.

2.

1.

2.

Analyze the Text Questions

1. Identify: How are the speaker in “After the Hurricane” and the narrator in Ninth Ward similar?

2. Compare: How are the circumstances faced by the poem’s speaker and the novel’s narrator different? How are their responses to their circumstances different?

3. Draw Conclusions: What have you learned from these selections about what it takes to be a survivor?

Language Arts

Narrative Essay Brainstorm

Complete the slides…

Name:London Parker

Date:March 23, 2022

Prompt →

Write a story about a person who moves to a new place. Include details about who or what your character misses most and about the surprises they find in the new place.

Who are your characters?

List at least 2 names and use 2 adjectives to describe each character.

Character 1: Elllie

  • Describe them: Quiet and nice
  • Character 2: Elliot
  • Describe them: Cautious and brave

Setting

  • Where is your main character originally from? Jacksonville Florida Briefly describe their hometown and how they felt about it? Jacksonville is a lot of fun and has a lot of beaches to enjoy. And most of all they miss their family.

2. Where is your character moving to? Pensacola, Florida. How do they feel about moving? They are moving because of Dad’s job and they have no family there and they don’t know anyone.

What point of view will you tell your story from? Choose one POV and change the font color to red.

First person point of view?

The main character is also the narrator.

Third person limited point of view?

The narrator is not a character in the story. The narrator only knows the thoughts and feelings of the main character.

Third person omniscient point of view.

The narrator is not a character in the story. The narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of all of the characters in the story.

  • Event 1: Prepare to move from Jacksonville Florida and move to Pensacola, Florida. The vent will involve bidding their friends by and parking their belongings.
  • Event 2:Loading the belongings to the truck and embark on the journey to their new residence. On arriving at the new residence, they will offload the properties and arrange them in the new house in Pensacola, Florida (Gee, 2019).
  • Event 3: To get oriented to the new environment by identifying and locating important social, and economic institutions and places they can get what they want. The event will also involve getting to know the new neighborhood (Gee, 2019).

Conflict

What is the problem in your narrative? What gets in the way of what the character(s) want?

  • The characters in the story are experiencing internal and external conflicts.
  • They are not willing to move to the new location but are forced by circumstances (Gee, 2019).
  • They are not sure of what will happen to them at the new residence and are resisting change.
  • They do not know if the environment in the new location is favorable like it was the case in the previous location (Gee, 2019).
  • They are not sure if they will be able to form friends that will be like those they had in their previous destination (Gee, 2019). . The only thing standing between what the characters want and what they do not want is their Dad’s job.
  • Event 1:Characters moving around the new residence trying to get or make new friends. They also move around the town as they get to know where they can enjoy themselves and spend their free time (Prince, 2013).

  • Event 2:The characters make up their minds to stay in the new location and they start sourcing for new schools and other new social institutions such as church, recreation places among other important areas in the new location that will make their stay in the new residence enjoyable (Prince, 2013).

Resolution

How does the conflict get resolved? How does your main character cope with their move to a new place?

  • Eventually, the conflict is reslved as the cahracters are pursueded by their father to move to the new location.
  • The characters also decide o move to the new locatio after brainstorming and realizing that moving is the only way to save their Da’s job.
  • The characters form new friendhip in the new neighborhood who helps them to cope with the residence dynamics.
  • They are orinted by new friends to get to know the area better so that they can leave a fear free life while enjoying their stay in the new environment.

References

  • Gee, J. P. (2019). A linguistic approach to narrative. Journal of narrative and life history, 1(1), 15-39.
  • Prince, G. (2013). A dictionary of narratology. U of Nebraska Press.

Language Arts

tilt
Ilill
ill”‘

COLLABORATE ScCOMPftftis “f

it

K^^OVEL

NIN^H^KARD
by Jewel! Parker Rhodes
pages 223-227

^

I

B*

..«

1:

II

COMPARE ACROSS GENRES
Now that you’ve read “After the Hurricane,”
read an excerpt from Ninth Ward to see how
this work of historical fiction tells another
story of survival related to Hurricane Katrina.
As you read, think about how the author uses
setting and language to describe the narrator’s
experience. After you read, you will collaborate
with a small group on a final project.

i&
»-.

ŝsse-s

<‘.-s

^2
^3is^w–

s-^
SSS

SsS
•^IS

3»f-^
-.sf:

lif-

&.-aw•SH •SS
s-S:

Bw

„.•;
3^-<: rtf—-SB£>i-» isa

^•”

E=: ^^CB”SS

^ ESSENTIAL
QUESTION:

What does
it take to
be a survivor?

1

i

‘SiSisgsssss.s.^

K;£

by Rita Williams-Garcia
pages 209-217

g
s

I
&

r-^

V.

sss

ff.
^-
s'(i

‘a1
-&I^ 6%^?

\;-%I
^ Esss.

Sf?S
-l^^”^–”

s3

•s
^»g

m
ss

is
g£f«:^ ^1

as
s

Amfe-i
=r.

=–,

i’-..a^-S^fte-s-
:”~^-

132S..

220 Unit 3

^
‘fi

.K

f

V

a-;

I

I

I
:-i

I

s,
i

i

s

.s

»;
^

t=E

I ?
&’ s

r s

I
^
sas

^

-•’

from Ninth Ward

QUICK START

What do you say to yourself when the going gets tough? What if you
had to coach a friend or a sibling through a difficult time? Write three
encouraging things you would say.

ANALYZE HISTORICAL AND
CULTURAL SETTING

The setting of a work of literature is the time and place of the action.
In historical fiction, the time period and culture play a significant role
in both plot and characterization. This selection’s setting is one area of
New Orleans during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. As the text’s
fictional characters respond to the setting, the author reveals the
characters’ important qualities and values.
• Setting can influence characters’values, beliefs, and emotions.
• Setting can affect how characters act and interact with others.
• Characters develop as they respond to historical and cultural
elements throughout the story. Their response may suggest the
story’s theme.

ANALYZE AUTHOR’S USE OF LANGUAGE

Mood is the feeling or atmosphere that a writer creates for the reader.
Descriptive words, imagery, and figurative language all influence the
mood of a work. Ninth Ward is a first-person narrative, so the mood
created by the narrator’s voice can reveal something about the main
character. As you read, note how language helps create the mood of
the text, and what the mood reveals about the text’s characters and
theme. Use a chart like the one below.

GET READY 0

GENRE ELEMENTS:
HISTORICAL FICTION
•is set in the past

• includes real places and real
events of historical importance

• can be a short story or a novel

• has the basic features of

realistic fiction, including plot,
characters, conflict, setting,
and theme

TEXT MOOD

TaShon lifts his head and wipes his eyes. | expectant
He looks far-off.

i

i

MY IDEAS ABOUT CHARACTER AND THEME

TaShon is someone who takes time to think
before speaking.

I

Ninth Ward 221

m

I.J

1

i

I

w

II-
^\

il

•f

li,4

Ill

!

I

f’:’

0 GET READY

CRITICAL VOCABULARY
fortitude endure horizon angular focus
To see how many Critical Vocabulary words you already know,
use them to complete the sentences.
1. Happy memories gave them_to survive the challenge.

•;

2. The performer had to_ his attention to walk on the
tightrope.

3. Sharp, straight lines meet to create a/an _ pattern.
4. The setting sun slipped beneath the . .
5. He could not. _ walking against the icy cold wind.
LANGUAGE CONVENTIONS
Pronouns A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun or
another pronoun. Personal pronouns, such as // me, he, she, we, us,
you, and it, refer to the person making a statement, the person(s)
being addressed, or the person(s) or thing(s) the statement is about.
The helicopter doesn’t seem to see us. It keeps flying.
The personal pronoun us refers to the narrator, Lanesha, and her
neighbor TaShon. It refers to an object, the helicopter. As you read,
notice the author’s use of pronouns.

NOTICE & NOTEANNOTATION MODEL
As you read, note words the author uses to indicate setting.1 Notice the effect of the author’s use of language on the mood and

j characterization, and how mood may indicate theme. You can also mark
evidence that supports your own ideas. In the model, you can see one
reader’s notes about Ninth Ward.

>
!

11 No land. Only sky and dirty water

2 TaShon has his head buried in Spots fur.
He’s crying full-out—sobbing like the world has
ended and Noah hasn’t landed his ark.

Soi^i^d? t?l£(?ik. I ^/ond^r •wl^e>’€
fl^ey i?ir£.

Mor€ cl<£+dilS abov+w^+er, c\^d
al^o ^(?idr\e$$. M»yi?e+l^ey ^^e
5J\’ro\^\^ed or $iyrrOL/nc)ed by
W(?>+€r.

-“^[^^s’s^y^ ?’7^%^!
^-^^—

RE;^^
B3^w

•^
<

Bt

I

{i
£
s

a

t
£

;^

a

&M
222 Unit 3

1

{

•^ •W3′

^&: NOTICE & NOTE

IS
k

BACKGROUND

Jewell Parker Rhodes (b. 1 954) loved to read and write as a child.
Ninth Ward /5 her first published book for young people. The Ninth
Ward is one of seventeen wards, or administrative districts, in New
Orleans. The largest and easternmost ward, the Ninth Ward is divided
by a shipping channel and another waterway. When Hurricane Katrina
struck New Orleans in 2005, the Ninth Ward received the greatest
damage. Many residents lost Their lives and homes in the
hurricane.

KS

S3s-

^

6-*.K
SBi–A–

sa •sm^p?
m
m

OT^HS^ A
lov6tl>y^6wetrt>arker Rhodes a&

B

J

I
f

I
s

I
I*
it
it
It
i!
IS

PREPARE TO COMPARE

As you read, pay attention to the selection’s mood and setting. Note
how characters respond to events. Think about how these elements
may help you recognize the selection’s theme, or message.

1 No land. Only sky and dirty water.
2 TaShon has his head buried in Spots fur. He’s crying

full-out—sobbing like the world has ended and Noah hasn’t
landed his ark.1

3 I want to sit and cry, too. But it’s almost dawn, and I
think when there’s light, someone will surely find us. I also
think, still dark, I’ve got to make sure TaShon doesn’t fall off
the roof into the water.

Notice & Note ^•ws’wsw

Use the side margins to notice
and note signposts in the text.

ANALYZE HISTORICAL AND
CUITORM SETTING
Annotate: Mark words in
paragraphs 1 -3 that show the
setting.

Identify: Which elements tell
you about the place and time?
Are there any elements that tell
you about the cultural setting?

3=

II

%

K

* Noah hasn’t landed his ark: in the biblical flood story, Noah builds an ark, or
large boat, to save his family and animals of every kind from a flood.

:!IE
ili
iiiiii
llili
4illB
:;i!

iL!l

li

II
Ill
Ill

^!1:

1!1

Ill

Ill

I

I!

:ll
1!

IIIJI
Jlll’l
lilii’
llilll
l;!lil:!|i
i;llll
l:ill!
ills i

Ill
IIEII
ill’ll!
jt!l!

Dili
II[lit

•I!

:1:1!
^

‘i!;
».

li

Ninth Ward 223

Ill i
i!J

I’ll!

tsss^n

S’ff

II!

t

I
a 1![
ill

^! i-i:

i

t
t

I

f

i

Ill

jj
:.{

i’i

i!l

‘i:i

NOTICE 8f NOTE

fortitude
(for’ti-tood) n. To have fortitude
is to show strength of mind and
face difficulty with courage.

endure
(en-ddor’) v. To endure is to
carry on despite difficulty or
suffering.

ANALYZE AUTHOR’S USE
OF LANGUAGE
Annotate: Mark the words in
paragraph 8 that help establish
the mood of this scene.

Analyze: How would you
describe the mood here?

LANGUAGE CONVENTtONS
Mark the pronouns in the first
sentence of paragraph 12. Who
are the pronouns referring to?

horizon
(hs-ri’zsn) n. The horizon is the
intersection of the earth and
sky.

angular
(ang’gys-lsr) adj. Something
that is angular, such as a
peaked roof, has two sides that
form an angle.

4 I feel tired, sad. Even though I expect to see her as a ghost, I
know I’ll still miss the flesh and blood Mama Ya-Ya.2 The warm
hands. Her making breakfast. And me resting my head upon
her shoulder. I’ll miss talking to her. Listening to her stories.

5 TaShon lifts his head and wipes his eyes. He looks far-off.
For a minute, I think hes going to be his quiet old self, and
pretend to disappear. Then, he says softly, “Fortitude.”

6 “Strength to endure.”
7 “That’s right. We’re going to show fortitude.”
8 TaShon and I scoot closer, our arms and legs touching, I

put my arms around him; he puts his arms around me. Neither
of us moves. I know we are both thinking, murmuring in our
minds, over and over again, “Fortitude. Fortitude. Fortitude.”

9 Sunrise. As far as my eye can see, there is water.
10 The Mississippi is brown, filled with leaves, branches, and

pieces of folks’ lives. I see a plastic three-wheeler tangled in
algae. I see a picture frame with a gap-toothed boy smiling in
black and white. I see a red car, a Ford, floating.

11 Overhead, I hear a helicopter. It sounds like a lawn mower
in the sky.

12 Me and TaShon start yelling, waving our hands. Here,
over here.” The helicopter doesn’t seem to see us. It keeps flying
south. Its big bird wings circling and the roar of its engine
getting softer.

13 TaShon is cursing now. I haven’t the heart to say, “Watch
your mouth. Im positive the ‘copter man saw us. How come he
didn’t stop? Lift us in the air with rope?

14 I start trembling and look around my neighborhood. The
horizon is like none I’ve seen before. Just tips of houses. Tops or
halves of trees. Lampposts hacked off by water. Rooftops—some
flat, some angular—most, empty.

15 Far left, I see a man and woman sitting on a roof, their feet
in the water. Two blocks east, I see what I think is an entire
family. Five, six people, all different sizes, waving white sheets.3
I hear them screaming, calling for help.

16 Where are the others? At the Superdome? Safe in Baton
Rouge?4

2 Mama Ya-Ya: Lanesha’s elderly caretaker who has died during the water’s rise.
3 waving white sheets: in wartime, soldiers wave white flags to signal their

willingness to surrender to the enemy.
4 At the Superdome? Safe ui Baton Rouge?: the Superdome is the name of the

stadium in New Orleans that sheltered Katrina refugees. Baton Rouge is Louisiana’s
capital, and the city to which thousands of New Orleans residents fled to escapeHurricane Katrina.

224 Unit3

f
^
s

^
g
s

§
s

s

s’
s.

17 TaShon says softly, “At least we made it out of the attic,
didn’t we, Lanesha?”

18 I look at TaShon. I should’ve known better. Should’ve
known that there was more to see about TaShon than he ever let
show. He’s a butterfly, too.

19 “Yes, we did,” I say. “We made it out”

20 No one is coming. All day and all night, we waited. Spot panted,
slept. TaShon swatted at mosquitoes and his feet turned itchy
red after he left them in the water to cool off. We are both
sunburned. Funny, I didn’t think black folks sunburned. But all
day in the sun, no shade, has made me and TaShon red faced.

. My cheeks and shoulders hurt like someone touched them with
a hot iron.

21 I keep focused on the horizon. Above it, I search for
helicopters. Below it, I search for signs of my neighbors.

22 I used to think the Mississippi was beautiful. Not anymore.
Up close, it is filled with garbage; clothes and furniture, ugly
catfish and eels.

23 My lips are cracked. I’m hungry. Thirsty. Tired. I tell TaShon
a hundred different Bible stories—all about hope. I tell him
about Moses, David and Goliath, and Noah’s ark.5 “Someone’s
coming,” I insist. “People know we’re here.” But I feel Spot, if he
could talk, would say, “That’s a lie;” then blink his big brown
eyes.

24 The moon is high. TaShon is feverish and asleep. His legs, up to
his knees, are bright red. His face is peeling.

25 I haven’t seen any ghosts either. Are they scared?
26 I murmur, “Mama Ya-Ya, help me. Momma, help me.”

But the night doesn’t answer. Nothing shimmers. There’s no
message from another world.

27 Day two since the flood. Day three since the hurricane.
28 No one has come to our rescue. There’s no TV. No radio.

No news from anywhere. The family that has been hollering for
help is quiet now.

29 I can’t make the Mississippi disappear. I cant make food
and water appear. But we’re going to go stir-crazy, get more and
more miserable.

30 I press my head to my hand. I feel dizzy.

I

I
s
I

5Moses, David and Goliath, and Noah’s ark: in a set of stories from the Bible,
Moses is directed by God to lead the Israelites out of Egypt; David is a boy who
killed Goliath, a giant warrior; and Noah’s ark is the large boat Noah built to save
his family and animals from a flood.

NOTICE & NOTE

AHA MOMENT

Notice & Note: What does
Lanesha realize about TaShon
in paragraphs 16-19? Mark
the words that show Lanesha
is realizing something about
TaShon’s character.

Interpret: What does Lanesha
mean when she compares
TaShon to a butterfly?

focus
(fo’kss) v. When you focus on
something, you keep attention
fixed on it.

ANALYZE AUTHOR’S USE
OF LANGUAGE
Annotate: Mark the words in
paragraph 23 that help show
mood.

Infer: What does the mood
suggest about the kind of
person the narrator is?

^llitl
-w
.[

fill
Jll-i
:w

•i:;

:1; .[

ill
ill! a

1!

lii11!!
‘!iii!!l’i;
w\i:v:

till
•f

^1
^illl’

!|;|j|i;
w
;’1;!
itiiilili
1!tiliij!l
‘!WM
w
i!;

It:

!Ijl!:

jt

ivil

;i;^i!^

•ffiii

Ill
Ill

Ill
111111
Ill

..'”

ll’ll
^
w^1

1.11
i:il

Ninth Ward 225

a

i
f

i!l
^ NOTICE & NOTE

ANALYZE HISTORICAL AND
CULTURAL SETTING
Annotate: Mark the details in
paragraphs 34-40 that help
describe the scene.

I!

B ill
8
St

8′::I;
iii

^

l’!i
li
1;

B
R{litI
II

Predict: What do these details
reveal about the challenges
Lanesha andTaShon now face?

31 TaShon’s itching, rubbing his left foot against his right leg.
“Look. A rowboat.”

32 I exhale. “Mr. Henri’s! He liked catfish. He always gave some
to Mama Ya-Ya.”

33 TaShon’s eyes are bright.
34 I move to the left—careful not to slip in the water, my feet

angling on the roof. It’s slippery. .Water is in my tennis shoes.
The shingles are slick with oil and gunk.

35 I can barely see the house next door. Most of it is covered
with water. But a rowboat is floating, caught between our
two houses and a bigger willow tree that kept it from floating
down the street. It is maybe six, seven feet away. It’s south,
perpendicular to both our houses. “A sharp right angle.” Ifit’d
been parallel, it might’ve floated out—at least on the north side.
But the angle kept it safe.

36 “Do you think we can reach it?” asks TaShon. “The boat?”
37 I squint. The boat’s rope must be floating deep, loose inside

the water.

38 My arms aren’t long enough to push the boat free and I’m
not sure I can doggy-paddle to it.

39 “The angle’s all wrong.”
40 Well, right and wrong, I think. Right, cause being

perpendicular, it didn’t get swept away in the storm. Wrong,
cause being perpendicular, it needs to be unstuck.

41 I see TaShons shoulders sagging. Giving up.
42 How can I rescue a rowboat?
43 EVERYTHING IS MATH. Think, Lanesha.
44 I look about. There are all kinds of pieces of wood, trees

floating in the water. I see a long, thin trunk floating.
45 “TaShon. We’ve got to catch that tree.” It looks like a young

willow. Just a few years old.
46 I’m sure my hands can fit around its trunk. With effort, I

can hold it like a stick.

47 I lie down on my stomach, shouting, “Come on, come on!”
like a lunatic to the tree. It bobs left, then right. Then turns
sideways.

48 “We’ve got to grab it, TaShon!”
49 TaShon lies beside me on his stomach, too. We flap our

hands in the water, trying to make it draw near. Trying to create
another current in the muddy tide.

50 “It’s coming,” hollers TaShon. “It’s coming.”
5i “Brace yourself.” Though the tree is moving slow, it’ll be

heavy. “Don’t fall! Don’t fall in”53

m

f

I
t

i 3
f

‘n a

li’̂

226 Unit3

NOTICE & NOTE

a

3a

s-

.r

§

^

52 I stretch my arms wide, clawing at the water, trying to move
the trunk closer. I strain, feeling the pull in my shoulders. Water
is lapping, almost to my chin.

53 I clutch bark. A piece cracks away in my hand.
54 “Get it, get it,” TaShon screams. His arms are too short. The

trunk is floating by.
55 I inch my body further, my hips and legs still touching the

roof. Inhaling, I plunge forward. My arms are around the tree.

CHECKYOUR UNDERSTANDING
Answer these questions before moving on to the Analyze the Text
section on the following page.

1 Which sentence from the text suggests that Lanesha and TaShon
want to be rescued?

A The horizon is like none I’ve seen before.

B I see a red car, a Ford, floating.

C / think when there’s light, someone will surely find us.
D ‘Yes, we did;’ I say. “We made it out.”

2 In paragraph 2, the narrator says, “Noah hasn’t landed his ark”to —
F introduce another character in the story
G show that the story is set in the time of the Bible
H show thatTaShon enjoys Bible stories

J show that the land has been covered by floodwater

3 Which idea is supported by information at the conclusion of the
selection?

A Lanesha has faith that Spot will help them escape.
B Lanesha is determined to save them.

C Lanesha no longer enjoys telling Bible stories.
D Lanesha is very certain that they will be rescued.

‘^

Nl^
m
:ltll

II!

Ill

ii’!’ii|!

H’

Ninth Ward 227

SOS’S.ift
^tSa

RESPOND

II

SB 9

ANALYZE THE TEXT

‘•I

RESBARCHTIP
Use the search words

“image of_”to find
photographs of an event. Type
“map of_”to help you
understand the geography of
an area. Try the search words
“history of Ninth Ward” to find
websites about the Ninth Ward.

Evaluate your search results by
looking for information about
the organization that runs the
site.

Support your responses with evidence from the text. llj NOTEBOOK
1. Analyze Reread paragraphs 1-3 and note details about setting

and character traits. How is Ihe historical setting related to the
characters?

2. Draw Conclusions Review the author’s use of language in
paragraph 8. How do mood and characterization suggest the text’s
theme?

3. Summarize Review paragraphs 9-1 1. How does the text help you
understand the novel’s cultural setting?

4. Compare Review paragraphs 3 and 13. How would you compare
the narrator’s attitude in the two passages? Explain how Lanesha’s
character has changed over time.

5. Notice & Note Review paragraphs 36-48. What does Lanesha
realize about their situation? Explain how Lanesha uses this
realization to help TaShon overcome his sense of hopelessness.

RESEARCH

Thecity of New Orleans is divided into areas called “wards.” The Ninth
Ward suffered badly from Hurricane Katrina. Investigate the history of
the Ninth Ward, from the time before Hurricane Katrina to the present.
Use a chart like the one shown to record relevant information from
reliable sources.

NINTH WARD

FACT

I,

SOURCE

“^:w^.!f^SSSSf, ^.^B^

Connect Is there information online about the history of your own
city or neighborhood? Many areas have local historical societies that
also maintain websites. Go online to find information about your
community’s history.

;:r-

:sg

228 Unit 3

m
m
m

E

1-
I
3

I
s
£

s @

I
t
s

I

II IW RESPOND

CRITICAL VOCABULARY

j

HI

WORD BANK
fortitude

endure

horizon

angular

focus

Practice and Apply Explain which vocabulary word is most closely
related to another word you know.

1. Which vocabulary word goes with sunsef? Why?

2. Which vocabulary word goes with strengthPWhy7

3. Which vocabulary word goes with lasting? \Nhy7

4. Which vocabulary word goes with concentrate? Why7

5. Which vocabulary word goes with pointedPWhy7

II
II
K
IS
I!
E^

t^’

Bl
II;

1;

1

.!<.

I
g’i

Kl

Go to the Vocabulary
Studio for more on context
clues.

VOCABULARY STRATEGY: Context Clues

Context clues are the words and phrases surrounding a word that
“provide hints about its meaning. Sometimes, you may find a context
clue in the same sentence as an unfamiliar word. The whole sentence
can also be a good clue. In Ninth Ward, the meaning of horizon is
suggested by its context.

I keep focused on the horizon. Above it, I search for helicopters.
Below it, I search for signs of my neighbors.

If you didn’t know what horizon means, the words “above it”and
“below if’are clues. Reread the whole paragraph for another context
clue: above the horizon she looks for helicopters (in the sky); below it,
she looks for people (on the ground or in the water). Together these
hints can help you guess that horizon is “the place where the earth and
sky meet.” Confirm your guess by checking a print or online dictionary.

Practice and Apply Find context clues for each of the following words
and guess the word’s meaning. Then, check your definition.

s
‘^

:;:s
s

!.i1!

t’1’1

K
B;

B”
B-
Kli

i

WORD

fortitude (paragraph 5)

CONTEXT CLUES GUESSED DEFINITION DEFINITION

i

endure (paragraph 6)

angular (paragraph 14)

•vwsw’hyh

s

“y ‘-^•^S’^fK^^’.y 11^^^^^”

230 Unit 3

I
i

I

I

m

‘s
rn’i RESPOND

^Collaborate & Compare
COMPARE TEXTS

•I

B
!1
IE
tl

•.,
f

-F

iifl

j

I

Ri
i I
Ill I
IP I-

i:

i
K1

!•

I’ll

M

K
R

Wl

B-
K
B.i

i

Ill

l.i

i

s

^

%
;<

MtlRRICANE
Poem by
RitaWftlianis-fiareJa

ft0» NINTH WARD

S

^,

“After the Hurricane”and Ninth Ward use different genres, or types of
writing, to explore the effects of Hurricane Katrina on residents of New
Orleans. Even though the works are about a similar topic, they may
express different themes. Theme is a message about life or human
nature. Comparing texts from different genres—like poetry and
historical fiction—can give you a deeper understanding of the topic.
Often, writers do not state themes directly. Instead, readers must infer
themes based on information from the text and their own knowledge.
This information may include key statements, significant events, and
memorable images or symbols.

With your group, complete the chart by citing text evidence from the
selections.

“AFTER THE HURRICANE” NINTH WARD

Key Statements

Significant Events
I

Memorable
Images

^;.”!,W.^^^!^”^^’^^^^^^^^t;)B^|P^^^Pg^’^’^’.’Et.^

ANALYZE THE TEXTS

Discuss these questions in your group.

1. Identify How are the speaker in “After the Hurricane”and the
narrator in Ninth 14/ard simitar?

2. Compare How are the circumstances faced by the poem’s speaker
and the novel’s narrator different? How are their responses to their
circumstances different?

3. Infer Think about the image of helicopters in both selections. What
ideas does this image suggest in each selection?

4. Draw Conclusions What have you learned from these selections
about what it takes to be a survivor?

?n
‘•i

K

I
I

I

I 232 Unit 3

s-
g
&

‘s

II
s
8
s

II

II
•s
n

.-s

Language Arts

Narrative Essay Brainstorm

Complete the slides…

Name:London Parker

Date:March 23, 2022

Prompt →

Write a story about a person who moves to a new place. Include details about who or what your character misses most and about the surprises they find in the new place.

Who are your characters?

List at least 2 names and use 2 adjectives to describe each character.

Character 1: Elllie

Describe them: Quiet and nice

Character 2: Elliot

Describe them: Cautious and brave

exposition

Setting

Where is your main character originally from? Jacksonville Florida Briefly describe their hometown and how they felt about it? Jacksonville is a lot of fun and has a lot of beaches to enjoy. And most of all they miss their family.

2. Where is your character moving to? Pensacola, Florida. How do they feel about moving? They are moving because of Dad’s job and they have no family there and they don’t know anyone.

exposition

What point of view will you tell your story from? Choose one POV and change the font color to red.

First person point of view?

The main character is also the narrator.

Third person limited point of view?

The narrator is not a character in the story. The narrator only knows the thoughts and feelings of the main character.

Third person omniscient point of view.

The narrator is not a character in the story. The narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of all of the characters in the story.

exposition

Event 1:

Event 2:

Event 3:

Rising Actions

Conflict

What is the problem in your narrative? What gets in the way of what the character(s) want?

conflict

Event 1:

Event 2:

Falling Actions

Resolution

How does the conflict get resolved? How does your main character cope with their move to a new place?

conclusion

Language Arts

Informative Essay – “Pets Vs. People”

“Pets are not people. After all, dogs don’t go to school and cats don’t hold down jobs. But pet owners often consider their dogs and cats to be members of their families. In what ways are pets like people and in what ways are they not? Write a comparison-contrast essay explaining the similarities and differences between pets and people.” Your essay should be four to five paragraphs long.

Name:

Date: