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Health Promotion Program

2

Intervention Model

Alexis Heard

Columbus State University

Program in Design Kinesiology

March 21, 2022

Dr. G. Palevo


Health Intervention Model

Mental health is one of the imperative modifiers of concentration and performance among college students. Hence, the use of a health intervention model will be essential in my study as it will provide a blueprint to understand and address the issue of mental health among students. It will also guide the formulation and implementation of selected interventions (Hagger et al., 2020). Therefore, this study will utilize the Health Belief Model. The model will be customized and tailored to be in congruence with the study population and the health behavior in context.

The Health Belief Model will be used in my study as it provides a modality to promote health and mitigate disease-causing behaviors among populations. In addition, this theoretical model will be most appropriate in defining the key factors influential to behaviors affecting mental health in this study population (Hagger et al., 2020). The model will assist in delineating the key factors that affect mental health; such the individual perceived susceptibility to suffering from a mental health issue, perceived severity, perceived barriers to initiating action, exposure to support systems that promote health, and self-confidence in the ability to deal with a mental health issue and not relapse.

In conclusion, the health belief model will be used to design short-term and long-term interventions to promote mental health. This will entail assessing the students at risk, understanding the different risky behaviors associated with mental health, and providing channels to communicate with the students on the mechanisms to promote mental health (Zaidlin et al., 2020). This model can also be used in combination with other models. In so doing, the researcher will ensure the depth and breadth of the study gets achieved.

References

Hagger, M., Cameron, L., Hamilton, K., Hankonen, N., & Lintunen, T. (2020). The handbook of behavior change (1st ed.). Cambridge University Press. https://books.google.co.ke/books?id=IfEFEAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=health+belief+model&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiEvvT88eb2AhUzi_0HHVc0CSIQ6AF6BAgDEAI

Zaidlin, G., Lisnyj, K., Dougherty, B., Cook, N., & Papadopoulos, A. (2020). Utilizing the Health Belief Model to move post-secondary students toward flourishing mental health. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1-10. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17439760.2020.1858331?casa_token=UNVy2ByL5XcAAAAA:_G8sXjtFe2dV9P6NzetgP_t-rde-pNooKUEg45FCJS2ZeNKxeNf5UsH6vfr1buYB9ejB7Gcd7ojZEStDrQ

Health Promotion Program

Alexis Heard

SP 2022

Program in Design in Kinesiology

Mental Health for College Students Marketing Plan

4P’s

How it will be presented.

What it can provide.

Product

· Individual/ group psychotherapy/counseling

· It will help students get therapy or counseling for the issues they cannot handle alone.

· It will help students overcome the obstacles to well-being.

· Help to overcome any negative thoughts, behavior, or feeling.

· Therapy helps in improving focus on school or even at work.

· Reduces addition.

· Builds confidentiality.

· Diggs to identify symptom causes and offer alternative strategies for any bad behavior or feelings.

· It helps to improve quality of life by reducing stress and managing symptoms.

· Reduce college stigma.

Place

· Columbus, GA Community Centers

· College Campus meeting room

· Zoom Meetings

· Park Meetings

· Public Library Meeting Rooms

· Easy access for students to get to.

· Free environments for students who cannot afford transportation fees or internet services.

Promotion

· Facebook

· Instagram

· Student Email

· Text Messages

· School Postcard to dorms and homes

· The easiest method for getting the attention of social media students involved.

· People always have their phones, so that a text message would work great.

· Students receive text messages and emails all the time.

Price

· Value-based pricing will establish individual/group therapy/counseling prices. The following factors will determine the price:

· The issue being addressed and its severity.

· How the student will react to the therapy and the time taken to improve.

· The time they have stayed with the problem before consulting for assistance.

· Time is taken per session.

· Time of the day the service is needed.

· Students payability.

· Organization payability.

· Insurance programs.

· At first, the service will be offered generally to all the students as a promotion and advert of the service, then this will call for personal visitation, which will be paid.

· Quality individual therapy services.

· Acceptance of insurance to reduce the burden on our clients.

· Access to the service is easy. Therefore, the price will be determined by the method used to access the service.

· There is a high demand for quality counseling for many people; therefore, price skimming will help price the service.

· High availability of the therapy will lead to high pricing of the services.

· The inconvenience of the service will determine the price of the service because daytime service will be different from nighttime service provision.

· Taking to the organization staff or health club groups to organize a talk with the students, and the organization pays for them.

Health Promotion Program

1

Mission and Vision Statement

Alexis Heard

SP22 Program Design in Kinesiology

Dr. G. Palevo

Columbus State University

Feb 24, 2021


Mission and Vision Statement

Mission statement

The mission of the College Student Mental Health program is to assist, train, and give services to college students who are dealing with psychological health issues. This can be done by offering a secure space for individuals coping with mental wellness issues as college students and their psychological illnesses needs to express their concerns and get help. Mental health difficulties can affect a student’s way of learning and the success rate of passing a class.  The Student Mental Health program aims to connect students with services that will assist students in leading higher productive lives. We operate as the college’s central hub for psychological health, providing mental health counseling as well as well teaching and programming to learners. Our products are sensitive to cultural differences, cutting-edge, and research-based.

Objective

· Creating a well-being environment at college by concentrating on mental health assistance, health promotion, and well-being activities and programs is the objective.

· To help encourage cooperation in the establishment of mental wellness services and to encourage self-help activities in college.

Goals

· To collaborate with the administration, institutions, and other participants to facilitate improved psychological health and wellness all through campus, focusing on a rehabilitation and peer group participation philosophy.

· To create effective and reliable student-managed mental health institutions within the campus, as well as to advocate the worth and results of peer mental health facilities.

· As in secure, hygienic, courteous, and therapeutic care settings, offer psychological, educational, and problem managing assistance.

Greater degrees of well-being are associated with increased rates of engagement, productivity, and satisfaction, as well as better academic performance, reduced absences, and a decreased incidence of serious health concerns.

Health Promotion Program

1

3

Mental Health in college students

Alexis Heard

Program Design in Kinesiology

Dr. G. Palevo

Columbus State University

February 9, 2022

Mental Health in College Students

Mental health is a serious public health issue that impacts society at large. It includes mental conditions, depression, anxiety, and physical symptoms such as insomnia, fatigue, headaches, and back pain. When compared to other people, college students are routinely found to experience high rates of mental distress. For example, compared with the rest population, Australian medical students exhibited much higher levels of psychological distress. According to studies, mental anguish is more common among college students in Asian and Sub-Saharan African countries. According to Mboya et al. (2020), the largest incidence reported was 71.9 percent among medical students at Jizan Higher education institution in Saudi Arabia, almost identical to the percentage observed in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania among non-medical students that were at 70 percent. Mental health issues like mental distress are underreported in many parts of the world. This review will discuss mental illness, focusing on anxiety and depression among college students and its relationship to suicidal thoughts and programming intervention.

College students are likely to have a high rate of mental health disorders. It could be because college coincides with a difficult period for many regular and non-traditional first-year college students. Traditional students enroll for college after high school, and they are younger and still dependent on their parents for financial support. Therefore, they have no full-time work, and in some cases, they do not even have part-time (Bruffaerts et al., 2018). Consequently, concerning academic pressure, these students may experience trouble when handling additional adult-based obligations with no prior skills and intellectual competence required for adulthood. Many typical college students may encounter possibly stressful events for the very first time, like work, being in a committed relationship, or having roommates with different religions and cultural systems.

On the other hand, students who take a non-traditional approach are likely to be employed full-time and may have dependents that need their support. Due to this, many students have challenges trying to balance educational requirements with family and employment obligations. Most college students might experience persistence, aggravation, or initiation of mental and substance abuse disorders in these situations, with little or no care. The percentage of young individuals with psychological problems attending college has raised dramatically as awareness of child mental health problems has grown, as has the usage of more psychotropic drugs. A study conducted by Broglia et al. (2018) indicates increased severity of mental health needs among college students, and the demand is rapidly increasing every day. According to this study, increased tuition fees and broadening engagement schemes contribute to this problem. Broglia et al. (2018) also demonstrate overlapping interest in providing mobile applications that help students manage mental health and offer the potential to handle mental health challenges they face.

Most mental health issues peak in adolescence or early adulthood. According to Pedrelli et al. (2015), by the time young people reach the age of 25 years, seventy-five percent of them will have suffered from a mental condition and have already experienced certain symptoms. The increased upheavals linked to college may precipitate existing psychological issues that first emerged in childhood in conventional students. Students may face increased mental health symptoms or might have a recurrence given the demands of their various responsibilities.

Anxiety in College Students

 Anxiety disorders are a mental health issue among the most prevalent in college students, with the most of them struggling with the disorder. Social phobia is the earliest of the generalized anxiety disorder, whereas panic disorder, GAD, and PTSD appear later. In a population of older teenagers, the ages at which psychiatric illnesses first appear are when they join college. Many universities have documented a rise in the number of students suffering from anxiety, as mental health problems continue to be a major concern for many students. White’s study (2022) found a link between a greater desire for cognitive comprehension and increased stress levels and anxiety. The findings have important implications for students who have been under a lot of stress because of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Depression in College Students

Another mental disorder is depression which is among the most common psychological problem among college students. Depression is a serious issue today all over the world. Every nation is investing millions of dollars in solving related psychological problems, depression being one of them. The research survey was done by Sahin et al. (2021) on college students shows a total rate of 58% variance predictor of likelihood among the student population who will be suffering from psychological issues such as anxiety, stress, or depression. These kinds of problems are hindrances to all way round developments. If not treated, depression can lead to permanent mental disorders among students.

Contrary to what many people may believe, depression is a blues feeling and is a common and serious mental condition that is most of the time underestimated. It affects millions of Americans each year. People experiencing depression often lose interest of day-to-day activities, lack self-esteem, experience a lack of energy, and have difficulties in their sleeping patterns. According to Marck et al. (2021), if it’s not treated depression for a prolonged period, it may lead to poor health, drug, and alcohol abuse as well as suicidal ideation. There is no specific cause of depression, but it is often associated with the reoccurrence of one or more symptoms among students. Known forerunners of depression may include genetic inheritance of a chemical called neurological, chronic health illnesses, substance abuse, and high level of stress. There are different types of depression, with the most common one being clinical depression. Symptoms and signs vary depending on the severity, although they can also be specific to different students. After being diagnosed with clinical depression, they will likely experience the signs for the remaining part of their lives.

Relationship between Mental Disorders, Stress and Suicidal thoughts

A clinical study conducted by Wongpakaran et al. (2021), the research explored the relationship between depression, suicidal ideation, personality, and life stress and found the different causes of suicidal thoughts. The study results showed that suicidal thoughts were majorly correlated to anxiety, depression, stress, and personality disorders. Another analysis found that the main predictors of suicide were stressful life events, depression, and extraversion (Lester, 2021). The prevalence of depression among pre-college students shows that depression is very high in pre-university students. The severity and prevalence of depression have been higher in the older age group of students. According to Sazakli et al. (2021), students who studied commerce and statistics suffered more than art and science students. The condition was also relatively higher for male students, especially those studying in Government colleges.

Technology Use in Mental Health Programming

Technology can address the problem of minimal health care seeking among college kids. As stated previously, both conventional and non-traditional students express not seeking help due to a lack of opportunity or a fear of others might perceive. Technology-based diagnosis and treatment programs would provide confidentiality, be accessible at any time, and potentially behave less financial burden. Kola et al. (2021) discovered that most Nigerian perinatal teenagers possess and use smartphones. They would be eager to use these gadgets for mental health awareness, intervention, and preventative campaigns. In this group, smartphone usage is minimal, and women prefer health intervention using text messaging.

Several other studies have studied Web-based anxiety and depression studies to assess for mental issues amongst college students. Lee et al. (2022) investigated a Web-based strategy for testing for depressive episodes and other suicide risk indicators, with participants receiving a customized evaluation and online discussion with only a professional counselor. They found that at-risk students were more likely to seek help by taking this method. These studies evaluated together, encourage the use of Web-based interventions among college students to improve treatment seeking. Furthermore, offering computer-based interventions to students who are worried about being stigmatized or have little time may be beneficial. For instance, there is a variety of cognitive-behavioral therapeutic interventions demonstrated to be beneficial for treating a variety of mental health issues.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the issue of mental health amongst college students has become prevalent. Difficulties of early adulthood, drugs and alcohol abuse, and academic pressure to perform can result in mental illness or worsen pre-existing conditions. Most students suffer from anxiety and depression, which go untreated because they are afraid of seeking help because of stigmatization or lack awareness of these conditions. Since there are no adequate interventions that involve adherence to mental health treatment, the issue often becomes chronic. Therefore, it’s imperative to develop outreach mental health programs that aim to encourage adherence to therapy and other treatment interventions. It’s vital to involve family as college students are still dependent on their families. In addition, since the school curriculum might affect a realistic approach, healthcare providers must guarantee that therapy will be provided all year round for college students. They should also collaborate with other practitioners concerned about providing mental health treatments to students. Clinical intervention demands expertise and knowledge of students’ developmental psychology, concerns for college students, family structures, and the healthcare system.

References

Broglia, E., Millings, A., & Barkham, M. (2018). Challenges to addressing student mental health in embedded counseling services: the UK higher and further education institutions survey. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling46(4), 441-455.

Bruffaerts, R., Mortier, P., Kiekens, G., Auerbach, R. P., Cuijpers, P., Demyttenaere, K., … & Kessler, R. C. (2018). Mental health problems in first-year college students: Prevalence and academic functioning. Journal of affective disorders225, 97-103.

Kola, L., Abiona, D., Adefolarin, A. O., & Ben-Zeev, D. (2021). Mobile phone use and acceptability for delivering mental health information among perinatal adolescents in Nigeria: a survey study. JMIR Mental Health8(1), e20314.

Lee, S., Lim, J., Lee, S., Heo, Y., & Jung, D. (2022). Group-tailored feedback on online mental health screening for university students: using cluster analysis. BMC Primary Care23(1), 1-14.

Lester, D. (2021). Depression, Suicidal Ideation and the Big Five Personality Traits. Austin J Psychiatry Behav Sci7(1), 1077.

Marck, C. H., Hunter, A., Butler, E., Allan, M., Edward, K. L., Giles, A., … & Grech, L. B. (2021). Assessment and treatment of depression in people with multiple sclerosis: A qualitative analysis of specialist clinicians’ experiences. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 103362.

Mboya, I. B., John, B., Kibopile, E. S., Mhando, L., George, J., & Ngocho, J. S. (2020). Factors associated with mental distress among undergraduate students in northern Tanzania. BMC psychiatry20(1), 1-7.

Pedrelli, P., Nyer, M., Yeung, A., Zulauf, C., & Wilens, T. (2015). College students: mental health problems and treatment considerations. Academic psychiatry39(5), 503-511.

Sahin Baltaci, H., Kucuker, D., Ozkilic, I., Karatas, U. Y., & Ozdemir, H. A. (2021). Investigation of Variables Predicting Depression in College Students. Eurasian Journal of Educational Research92, 211-225.

Sazakli, E., Leotsinidis, M., Bakola, M., Kitsou, K. S., Katsifara, A., Konstantopoulou, A., & Jelastopulu, E. (2021). Prevalence and associated factors of anxiety and depression in students at a Greek university during COVID-19 lockdown. Journal of public health research10(3).

White, H. A. (2022). Need for cognitive closure predicts the stress and anxiety of college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Personality and Individual Differences187, 111393.

Wongpakaran, N., Oon-Arom, A., Karawekpanyawong, N., Lohanan, T., Leesawat, T., & Wongpakaran, T. (2021, October). Borderline Personality Symptoms: What Not to Be Overlooked When Approaching Suicidal Ideation among University Students. In Healthcare (Vol. 9, No. 10, p. 1399). Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute.

Health Promotion Program

6

Mental Health in college students

Alexis Heard

Columbus State University

SP 22’ Program Design in Kinesiology

Dr. G. Palevo

February 17, 2022

Mental Health in College Students

Health status

Mental health issues encompass factors that affect cognitive, emotional, and behavioral well-being. Any deviation of mental health status from normal may lead to any of the following mental disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, and physical symptoms like fatigue, insomnia, back pain, and headaches. Mental health problems have statistically proven to be highly prevalent among college students. For example, in a survey involving Australian students, higher levels of psychological distress were noted. In another state-wise survey by the American Psychological Association (APA), 95% of college counseling centers directors reported alarming and growing concerns over growing numbers of mental health issues among college students (Auerbach et al., 2016). Anxiety is the topping concern with a prevalence rate of 41.6%, followed by depression at 36. 5%, other mental distresses concerns relationships and accounts for 35.8%. These prevalence’s can be attributed to a busy college schedule, financial issues, and lack of balance between having fun and studying.

College lends itself a host to many new things: independence, freedom, opportunity, and autonomy. The transition from high school to college also takes a hefty toll on contributing to deleterious health consequences to college students (Bruffaerts et al., 2018). For instance, lack of engagement can be a sign of depression, excessive worrying, increased dependence on a substance such as excessive drinking to numb emotions, or a changing relationship with food. In such cases, one no longer pays attention to eating patterns and tends to avoid socializing when there is food or exercise excessively. According to Lee et al. (2022). mental health problems can affect students’ concentration, energy, mental ability, dependability, optimism and hinder performance. Depression, for example, is associated with low-grade point averages, truancy, and dropouts. In the end, roommates, peers, staff, family members may end up suffering consequences of poor relationships, poor work productivity, and profound grief from suicides.

Community description

The program’s scope is on college students across the state and beyond. Global estimates of mental health problems suggest that one in four people globally have experienced or will experience mental health issues in their lifetime (Pedrelli et al., 2015). It is the third leading cause of mortalities among young people. Therefore, the program aims to assess the health needs of all reachable college students locally, state-wise, and even nationally.

Needs Assessment

Based on qualitative needs assessments done through focus groups, projects, scenarios, case study reports, introspection, visual texts, role-play simulation, and direct observations, major health needs of the students were identified. The majorly identified health needs include helping erase suicidal feelings and thoughts, eating disorders, overactivity and poor concentration, obsessive-compulsive disorder, low mood, and depression.

Naturally, a human’s body and mind are not separate; it is therefore not surprising that mental health problems impact the body. For example, depression can cause fatigue, headaches, and digestive problems. The overall effects on the quality of life range from a feeling of distress, lack of control, choice, and autonomy, low confidence, diminished activity, and feeling of hopelessness and demoralization (Sazakli et al.,2021).

Major identified causes of mental health problems among college students include pressure to succeed in academics, uncertainty, financial distress, and increased social media use.

Non-specific combat strategies needed in the schools includes

a) Promotion of healthy eating habits

b) Encouraging physical activity

c) Promotion of healthy sleeping habits

d) Social Media use sensitization campaigns to minimize excessive social media use, inactivity, and visiting unauthorized sites.

Quantitative assessments focus on numbers or quantities and gather the information that yields results that can be quantified. A report by Karyotak et al. (2020) showed that one-third of students screened positive for at least a single in six mental health illnesses. With a prevalence of 27% exhibited over 12 months, the study demonstrated a possible lifetime prevalence of 28.7%. This calls for an array of measures, including the following.

a) Once a month mental health seminar in college institutions in California.

b) Employment of an adequate number of psychiatric mental health practitioners across institutions to balance student: psychiatrist ratio.

c) Install at least two support group meetings for students to guide each other towards shared goal recovery.

d) Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) – CAM includes treatment practices typically not associated with standard care.

e) Self-help plans- self-help plans are severely lacking among college studies in the United States. They may, however, have a hand in helping students implement strategies to promote wellness recovery and identify warning signs.

Community link

The United States government currently offers various programs and services to support people with mental health needs, including students. They include income support, disability services, community support, workforce participation programs, and housing.

In hospitals, the current most common way of treating mental health illnesses and challenges includes psychotherapy, also called talk therapy and counseling (Auerbach et al., 2016).

The proposed program will come in a batch of complementary programs to support existing programs in boosting mental health issues among college students. Salient things the program will include:

1) Enhancing counseling and psychotherapy through maximum stakeholder engagement and online campaigns

2) Technology use in mental health programming-technology is likely to address problems of minimal healthcare-seeking behavior among college students. Through technology-based diagnosis, and well-coordinated psychotherapeutic and pharmacotherapeutics approaches, confidentiality will be enhanced, fewer financial expenses will be incurred, and accessibility will be enhanced since services will happen through simple web-search.

3) Community support and awareness campaigns will also help promote awareness, reduce discrimination and stigma, supporting social inclusion and recovery while preventing mental disorders.

References

Auerbach, R. P., Alonso, J., Axinn, W. G., Cuijpers, P., Ebert, D. D., Green, J. G., … & Bruffaerts, R. (2016). Mental disorders among college students in the World Health Organization world mental health surveys. Psychological medicine46(14), 2955-2970.

Bruffaerts, R., Mortier, P., Kiekens, G., Auerbach, R. P., Cuijpers, P., Demyttenaere, K., &

Kessler, R. C. (2018). Mental health problems in first-year college students: Prevalence and academic functioning. Journal of affective disorders225, 97-103

Lee, S., Lim, J., Lee, S., Heo, Y., & Jung, D. (2022). Group-tailored feedback on online mental health screening for university students: using cluster analysis. BMC Primary Care23(1), 1-14.

Pedrelli, P., Nyer, M., Yeung, A., Zulauf, C., & Wilens, T. (2015). College students: mental health problems and treatment considerations. Academic psychiatry39(5), 503-511.

Karyotaki, E., Cuijpers, P., Albor, Y., Alonso, J., Auerbach, R. P., Bantjes, J., & Kessler, R. C.

(2020). Sources of stress and their associations with mental disorders among college students: results of `the world health organization world mental health surveys international college student initiative. Frontiers in psychology, 1759.

Sazakli, E., Leotsinidis, M., Bakola, M., Kitsou, K. S., Katsifara, A., Konstantopoulou, A., & Jelastopulu, E. (2021). Prevalence and associated factors of anxiety and depression in students at a Greek university during COVID-19 lockdown. Journal of public health research10(3).

Health Promotion Program

Creating a Budget/Allocation of Resources

Alexis Heard

SP22 Program Design in Kinesiology

Dr. G. Palevo

Columbus State University

March 29, 2022

Budget

april

Column2

Column3

may

Column4

Column5

June

Column6

Column7

REVENUE

Actual

projected

variance

Actual

projected

variance

Actual

projected

variance

sales

$30,000

$20,000

$10,000

$32,000

$30,000

$2,000

$31,000

$27,000

$4,000

sponsorship

$2,500

$2,000

$500

$2,800

$2,200

$600

$2,700

$2,500

$200

grants

$1,500

$1,500

$0

$1,700

$1,500

$200

$1,750

$1,600

$150

gifts

$1,200

$1,000

$200

$1,400

$1,400

$0

$1,550

$1,450

$100

participant fees

$1,100

$1,000

$100

$1,000

$950

$50

$1,300

$1,170

$130

TOTAL REVENUE

$36,300

$25,500

$10,800

$38,900

$36,050

$2,850

$38,300

$33,720

$4,580

Expenditures

personnel

$1,000

$600

$400

$1,230

$1,150

$80

$1,300

$1,200

$100

equipment

$1,250

$1,200

$50

$1,590

$1,520

$70

$1,200

$1,100

$100

supplies

$1,050

$950

$100

$1,400

$1,250

$150

$1,100

$900

$200

space

$2,000

$1,800

$200

$1,900

$1,700

$200

$1,590

$1,400

$190

subcontractors

$1,900

$1,750

$150

$1,850

$1,600

$250

$1,500

$1,300

$200

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

$7,200

$6,300

$900

$7,970

$7,220

$750

$6,690

$5,900

$790

PROFIT/LOSS

$29,100

$19,200

$9,900

$30,930

$28,830

$2,100

$31,610

$27,820

$3,790

While undertaking any project, a budget is essential. Budgets may be of different types: financial budget, cash budget, master budget, and operating budget. A budget helps in the control of expenditures. With a budget, one will keep on the truck of their financial goals. A budget aids someone to avoid getting out of debt. Emergency funds a catered for in a budget. In case of any emergency, one won’t strain where they will get funds (Juhana & Wasistiono & Tahir, 2020). They will get into their account and withdraw the emergency funds. With a well-organized budget, one will save money. Much money will be saved as expenses will be kept at a minimum, and the income sources will be maximized.

In our case, the budget will enable us to estimate our revenue and expenditure. For instance, our estimated revenue is $25500, $36050, and $33720 in April, May, and June, respectively. The total expenditures estimated are $6300 in April, $7220 in May, and $5900 in June. By projecting the revenues and expenditure, we will be able to calculate the forecasted net profit or loss (Ikramovich & Mirjalilovich, 2021, June). The projected net profit will be $19200, $28830, and $27820 in April, May, and June. To increase our anticipated profits generated from the project, we will be compelled to decrease the budget expenditure and increase the revenue items.

References

Juhana, J., Wasistiono, S., & Tahir, I. (2020). The Importance of Delegation of Authority, Budget Allocation and Leadership in Improving Performance. International Journal of Science and Society2(1), 221-228.

Ikramovich, R. Z., & Mirjalilovich, I. A. (2021, June). THE IMPORTANCE OF TAX POLICY IN THE FORMATION OF BUDGET REVENUES. In ” ONLINE-CONFERENCES” PLATFORM (pp. 122-124).

Health Promotion Program

Theoretical Framework

Alexis Heard

Columbus State University

Program in Design Kinesiology

March 01, 2022

Dr. G. Palevo

Theoretical Framework

The mental health program for college students focuses on promoting social-emotional learning and endurance, and also preventing collective, psychological, and behavioral challenges, such as risk behaviors. As a result, the theoretical framework depicts college mental health as a single major topic, depending on available information on psychological health promotion and management. Social, emotional, and behavioral difficulties are avoided.

The framework is further described in the following sections of the study by addressing the primary domains in connection to psychological health consequences and the various developmental mechanisms. I also include a set of critical goal abilities and behaviors for both students and teachers, as well as a summary of the primary theoretical components addressed.

Interpersonal, emotional, and behavioral challenges refer to a wide range of behaviors that college students can acquire to varying levels, which can be internalizing or externalizing. Depression, criminality, social disengagement, self-harm, anxiety,  drug usage, rule-breaking, and violent behavior are commonly targeted in school programs to reduce emotional, behavioral, and social difficulties.

The Theory of Planned Behavior can be used to forecast a person’s willingness to participate in a given behavior at a particular moment and location. The hypothesis was designed to describe all behaviors over which humans can exercise self restraints (Ajzen & Schmidt, 2020). Behavioral intention is a significant element of this paradigm; motives are impacted by one’s view about the probability that the conduct will produce the anticipated result, as well as one’s subjective assessment of the dangers and advantages of that result.

The Theory of Planned Behavior has been effectively utilized to forecast and describe a variety of mental health-related behaviors and motives amongst students, such as smoking, alcoholism, health-care utilization (Lipson et al., 2019), and substance abuse, among many other things. According to the Theory of Planned Behavior, behavioral success is determined by both motive and potential. The ability to undertake the behavior successfully is contingent not just on a positive purpose, but also on a suitable level of behavioral control.

The Theory of Planned Behavior proposes that measuring one’s mindset regarding the conduct, subjective standards connected with the behavior, and apparent influence over completing it might anticipate one’s motives to execute it (McKenzie et al., 2009)The TPB emphasizes the need of using a multifaceted strategy to understand what influences a person’s purpose to undertake a behavior. If a participant’s desire to pursue psychological assistance is swayed primarily by subjective values that are hostile to PHS, a study’s effort to persuade this individual’s motive to obtain psychological assistance might be disappointed if behavior modification is the only target of treatment.

Interventions can be used on a broad level, involving every student, or at a more focused rate, with students who are at risk of establishing or have already manifested, modest mental health issues. Preventive measures that are available to everyone are thought to be less alienating. Moreover, both general and focused preventative programs exhibit equal impact values, demonstrating that both general and specialized preventive interventions are needed. Systematic studies of general interventions in college students, specifically, found that internalizing psychological health disorders like anxiety, stress, and depression indicators were significantly reduced (Lattie et al., 2019). Research on the efficacy of preventative strategies for externalizing disorders has a lot in common. Considerable reductions in specified behavioral difficulties were found, with impacts extending for one year.

The students who took participated in a short cognitive education session experienced significant reductions in anxiety and tension. In a group of students who performed yoga, levels of stress levels are less, and general mental well-being is higher, as contrasted to a regulated group.

The goals of this study were to look at the psychological health of college students to contribute to a better comprehension of the term and to give a thorough theoretical framework for psychological health management at colleges that consider students’ needs into account.

References

Ajzen, I., & Schmidt, P. (2020). Changing behavior using the theory of planned behavior. The handbook of behavior change, 17-31.

Lattie, E. G., Adkins, E. C., Winquist, N., Stiles-Shields, C., Wafford, Q. E., & Graham, A. K. (2019). Digital mental health interventions for depression, anxiety, and enhancement of psychological well-being among college students: systematic review. Journal of medical Internet research, 21(7), e12869.

Lipson, S. K., Lattie, E. G., & Eisenberg, D. (2019). Increased rates of mental health service utilization by US college students: 10-year population-level trends (2007–2017). Psychiatric services, 70(1), 60-63.

McKenzie, J. F., Neiger, B. L., & Thackeray, R. (2009). Planning, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs: A primer (p. 496). San Francisco, CA: Pearson/Benjamin Cummings.

Health Promotion Program

 

Health Promotion Program: Final project:

The final assessment of the course will be the submission of your complete health promotion program that you developed throughout this course. 

Here is what you need to do:

  1. Use and follow APA guidelines
  2. Cover Page
  3. Introduction of your topic and program.  This includes:
    1. the statement of the problem,
    2. supportive evidence in terms of data from reputable sources, and
    3. needs assessment. 
  4. Mission, Goals and Objectives
  5. Theory Model
  6. The Intervention Model
  7. Budget and Allocation of resources
  8. Marketing Plan
  9. Implementation of your program
  10. Final conclusions.  here I would like for you to share your experience with developing your program in this course.
  11. Reference Page is required.  

Let me know what else is needed. All the sources are here. I just need things put into a final paper formation to submit and it must flow and make sense. 

Health Promotion Program

Hi, i need this chart i provide in the link to be filled based on these information:

Also i give you sample of a assessment as a guide to get an idea what does it mean ‘ Needs Assessment’

Health Promotion Program, Part B: Needs AssessmentThe next step in developing your 10-20 minute health promotion program is to identify the learning needs assessment. Use the information in this chapter, to develop and conduct a needs assessment of 3-5 persons meeting the criteria of the target audience to submit your results.  You can conduct this with each person individually or get them together as a small focus group.  The needs assessment should be a short interview or survey to determine what the clients’ major concerns are related to the Healthy People 2020 goal and objective you have selected to focus on for this project as well as their overall knowledge in the area