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****For Miss Deana***

The case will present a series of situations and decisions that a business had to go through. This is a summary of the case: 

 

This case illustrates the challenges that Pollo Campero, a Guatemalan fast-food company, faces when expanding in the US market. The case illustrates that Pollo Campero was initially very successful in the US market because it appealed to consumers of Central American origin. It found it harder to appeal to a broader range of US consumers, who had no emotional attachment to the brand.

Your job as a team is to create a compelling presentation that conveys the story that Pollo Campero went through. In order to do that please try to research everything that you can find about the company. If you find interesting videos, you can include them in your presentation. Please go through the company website and understand the company as much as you can. 

The business case touches issues on consumer segmentation, competitive strategy and the internationalization of emerging market multinationals. All of these topics should be viewed from an entrepreneurial perspective because opening operations in a foreign country is an entrepreneurial activity similar to opening a new business.

After explaining what the company went through, please open a discussion with your peers (students attending the class). Getting as many students engaged in the discussion will have a positive impact in your grades. The discussion should be around best possible solutions to the topics presented in the business case. 

****For Miss Deana***

Business Plan

[Click here and type your business name]

[Click here and type your address]
[Click here and type your phone number]

[Click here and type the date]

[Click here and type the people on the management team]

This document is confidential.

2

Table of Contents

Table of Contents ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
Executive Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Vision/Mission Statement and Goals ……………………………………………………………………. 4

A. Vision Statement……………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
B. Goals and Objectives …………………………………………………………………………………. 4
C. Keys to Success ………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

Company Summary …………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
A. Company Background ……………………………………………………………………………….. 5
B. Resources, Facilities and Equipment …………………………………………………………….. 5
C. Marketing Methods ……………………………………………………………………………………. 5
D. Management and Organization…………………………………………………………………….. 5
E. Ownership Structure …………………………………………………………………………………… 5
G. Internal Analysis ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

Products and/or Services ……………………………………………………………………………………. 7
Market Assessment …………………………………………………………………………………………… 8

A. External Analysis ………………………………………………………………………………………. 8
B. Customers ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8
C. Strategic Alternatives …………………………………………………………………………………. 8

Strategic Implementation ……………………………………………………………………………………. 9
Financial Plan …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11

A. Financial Projections………………………………………………………………………………… 11
B. Contingency Plan …………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

Monitoring ……………………………………………………………. Error! Bookmark not defined.

3

Executive Summary

This section is a summary of the information from the pages that follow. Prepare it last,
after the business plan has been written. It should not exceed two pages. Headings to use
in the Executive Summary:

A. Vision/Mission Statement
B. Company Summary
C. Products/Services
D. Market Assessment
E. Strategic Implementation
F. Expected Outcomes

4

Vision/Mission Statement and Goals

A. Vision Statement
The vision/mission statements are clear summaries of where the business is headed. It
describes what the business produces, who products are produced for, and unique
business characteristics. It will reflect the values of the management team and the type of
business culture you are trying to create.

B. Goals and Objectives
What do you want your business to achieve? Be specific in terms of financial
performance, resource commitments (time and money) and risk.
When will various milestones be achieved?

C. Keys to Success
What do you need, or must happen, for you to succeed?

5

Company Summary
The material in this section is an introduction to the firm.

A. Company Background
What does your business do?
Who were the founders of the business?
What were the important milestones in the development of the business?

B. Resources, Facilities and Equipment
With what do you produce your products or services?
What are the land, equipment, human and financial resources?
Who provides them?
How are resource providers rewarded?

C. Marketing Methods
What is your annual sales volume in dollars and units?
Explain how you work with others to improve returns. This may include a strategic
alliance with suppliers or customers that you can leverage.
Do you use forward contracting, options, or futures? If so, how?
How much does it cost to produce and deliver your products and services?
How is contracting used?

D. Management and Organization
Who is currently on the management team?
How have management responsibilities been divided among the management team?
What are the lines of authority?
Who acts as the president/CEO? spokesperson? Chief Financial Officer?
Who determines employees’ salaries and conducts performance reviews?
What is the educational background of the management team members?
What is the management team’s reputation in the community?
What special skills and abilities does the management team have?
What additional skills does the management team need?
Who are the key people and personnel that make your business run?
Who do you go to for advice and support?
Do management and employees have avenues for personal development?
Sketch a diagram of lines of authority for your operation.

E. Ownership Structure
Who are the primary stakeholders in your business?
Describe the legal form of your company, such as partnership, proprietorship, or
corporation.
Do you need special permits to operate, or a record for inspections? If you do, please
describe them.

6

F. Social Responsibility
What environmental practices do you follow?
What procedures do you use for handling chemicals?
What noise/dust/timing/odor policies do you have?
What will be the roles of management and employees in community organizations?
What will be your involvement at the local/state/national level in commodity
organizations?
What training and new employee orientation practices will you offer to insure proper
handling of hazardous materials and safe operation of equipment?

G. Internal Analysis
What are the strengths and weaknesses of your firm?
What are the relative strengths of each enterprise or business unit within the firm?
What are the core competencies (things you are doing better than others) of your firm?
What things can you build on? Think only about the things that you can control.
Suggested areas to consider:

• knowledge and work
• financial position
• productivity
• family
• lifestyle
• location
• resources

What enterprise or business unit should be exited?
What enterprise or business unit shows promise?

7

Products and/or Services

Describe the products and services you plan to sell.
How is your product or service unique?
Are you producing a commodity or a differentiated product?
How does your product or service compare to other products in
Quality? Price? Location?
What experience do you have with this product/service?

8

Market Assessment

A. Examining the General Market
How is the market characterized?
Are there clear segments in the market? Describe them.
What important customer need(s) is the market not currently fulfilling?
What is the growth potential for each segment of the market?
What opportunities and threats does your firm face?
What does an analysis using the Five Forces model suggest about your industry? Who is
your competition (in light of the Five Forces)?
What trends, relevant to your business, do you see?
What are the drivers of change?
What political and legal issues do you face, such as zoning, environmental laws,
inspections, etc?

B. Customer Analysis
Who will be your customers?
What do you sell to each of the customers?
How does your product/service solve a key customer problem?
How difficult is it to retain a customer?
How much does it cost to support a customer?

C. Industry Analysis

D. Strategic Alternatives

9

Strategic Implementation

A. Production
How will you produce your product?
What value will you create and capture with your product?
What is your competitive advantage?
What technology will you use, i.e. reduced tillage, GPS systems, etc.?
What processes will you use to produce products?
What growth options will you use to develop the business unit?

• Enterprise Expansion
• Replicate
• Integrate
• Network

What is the anticipated timeline?

B. Resource Needs
In order to effectively organize your business you need to insure the resources are
available. Assess those needs here.

a) Human
What skills are needed?
How will human resources be acquired?

b) Financial

What level of financial resources will be needed?

c) Physical

What type, quantity and quality of physical resources will be required?

C. Sourcing/Procurement Strategy
On what do you base a decision to buy products or services? Price? Quality?
Convenience? Extra service? A combination?
By what venue will you find suppliers — local dealer, Internet, direct from manufacturer,
etc.?

D. Marketing Strategy
What is your sales plan?
What advertising and promotion will be used to increase sales/awareness?
Where will you sell products/services?
Will you use the open market or contracts?
Do you have a preferred market outlet?
Are you a qualified supplier for a specific processor or buyer?
How will you price the product?

10

a) Hedging, forward pricing, options
How will you use these to mitigate your risk?

b) Contracting
Will you use production or marketing contracting to reduce risk?

c) Insurance
How will you use crop, liability and other insurance?

E. Performance Standards
What performance standards will be used to monitor this enterprise or business unit?
What are acceptable performance standards?
What yield or output levels could you attain?
What efficiency levels will you reach?
What procedures will be used to monitor performance?
Who is responsible for monitoring performance?
What industry benchmarks will be used to assess performance?

11

Financial Plan

A. Financial Projections
How will you fund the business?
What is your desired debt and equity position?
Who will provide capital debt funds?
What role will leasing play in your financial strategy?
Will you use outside investors for equity capital?
How will you manage the financial risks your business faces?
What operating procedures, such as developing cash flow budgets or spending limits, will
you have to ensure adequate money for debt repayment?
What are the important assumptions that underlie your projections? These assumptions
may be associated with both external or internal factors.
What financial aspects of your business (equity, asset growth, ROA, ROE, etc.) will you
monitor?
What procedures will be used for monitoring overall business performance?
What level of performance will your business shoot for? These should be targets for next
year and in five years. They should be financial performance standards used to monitor
the overall business.
What yield and output levels could you attain? What efficiency levels will you reach?

B. Contingency Plan
What will you do if you can’t follow through with your primary plan?
How are you preparing for an emergency in your business?
How will the business function if something happens to one of the key members of the
management team?

  • Business Plan
  • Table of Contents
  • Executive Summary
    • A. Vision/Mission Statement
    • B. Company Summary
    • C. Products/Services
    • D. Market Assessment
    • E. Strategic Implementation
    • F. Expected Outcomes
  • Vision/Mission Statement and Goals
    • A. Vision Statement
    • B. Goals and Objectives
    • C. Keys to Success
  • Company Summary
    • A. Company Background
    • B. Resources, Facilities and Equipment
    • C. Marketing Methods
    • D. Management and Organization
    • E. Ownership Structure
      • F. Social Responsibility
    • G. Internal Analysis
  • Products and/or Services
  • Market Assessment
    • A. Examining the General Market
    • B. Customer Analysis
    • C. Industry Analysis
    • D. Strategic Alternatives
  • Strategic Implementation
    • A. Production
    • B. Resource Needs
    • C. Sourcing/Procurement Strategy
    • D. Marketing Strategy
    • E. Performance Standards
  • Financial Plan
    • A. Financial Projections
    • B. Contingency Plan

****For Miss Deana***

Business Plan

MAEmusic

3301 Davie Blvd

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312

954-581-2203 TEL

04-19-22

GROUP TWO PRESENTATION/ NSU- business case study

This document is confidential.

2

Table of Contents

Table of Contents ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

Executive Summary………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3

Vision/Mission Statement and Goals……………………………………………………………………. 4

A. Vision Statement……………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

B. Goals and Objectives …………………………………………………………………………………. 4

C. Keys to Success ………………………………………………………………………………………… 4

Company Summary ……Sonia Hankerson………………………………………………………………………….. 5

A. Company Background ……………………………………………………………………………….. 5

B. Resources, Facilities and Equipment ……Sonia Hankerson………………………………………….. 5

C. Marketing Methods …………………………………………………………………………………… 5

D. Management and Organization ……………………………………………………………………. 5

E. Ownership Structure …………………………………………………………………………………… 5

G. Internal Analysis …….Sonia Hankerson………………………………………………………………………. 6

Products and/or Services ……………………………………………………………………………………. 7

Market Assessment ………Sonia Hankerson……………………………………………………………………….. 8

A. External Analysis ………..Sonia Hankerson…………………………………. 8

B. Customers ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8

C. Strategic Alternatives …………………………………………………………………………………. 8

Strategic Implementation ……………………………………………………………………………………. 9

Financial Plan …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11

A. Financial Projections ………………………………………………………………………………… 11

B. Contingency Plan………………………………………………………………………………… 11

Monitoring …………………………………………………………….

Error! Bookmark not defined.

3

Executive Summary

This section is a summary of the information from the pages that follow. Prepare it last,

after the business plan has been written. It should not exceed two pages. Headings to use

in the Executive Summary:

A.

Vision/Mission Statement

B.

Company Summary

C.

Products/Services

D.

Market Assessment

E.

Strategic Implementation

F.

Expected Outcomes

4

Vision/Mission Statement and Goals

A. Vision Statement

The vision/mission statements are clear summaries of where the business is headed. It

describes what the business produces, who products are produced for, and unique

business characteristics. It will reflect the values of the management team and the type of

business culture you are trying to create.

B. Goals and Objectives

What do you want your business to achieve? Be specific in terms of financial

performance, resource commitments (time and money) and risk.

When will various milestones be achieved?

C. Keys to Success

What do you need, or must happen, for you to succeed?

5

Company Summary

The material in this section is an introduction to the firm.

A. Company Background

What does your business do?

Who were the founders of the business?

What were the important milestones in the development of the business?

B. Resources, Facilities and Equipment

With what do you produce your products or services?

What are the land, equipment, human and financial resources?

Who provides them?

How are resource providers rewarded?

C. Marketing Methods

What is your annual sales volume in dollars and units?

Explain how you work with others to improve returns. This may include a strategic

alliance with suppliers or customers that you can leverage.

Do you use forward contracting, options, or futures? If so, how?

How much does it cost to produce and deliver your products and services?

How is contracting used?

D. Management and Organization

Who is currently on the management team?

How have management responsibilities been divided among the management team?

What are the lines of authority?

Who acts as the president/CEO? spokesperson? Chief Financial Officer?

Who determines employees’ salaries and conducts performance reviews?

What is the educational background of the management team members?

What is the management team’s reputation in the community?

What special skills and abilities does the management team have?

What additional skills does the management team need?

Who are the key people and personnel that make your business run?

Who do you go to for advice and support?

Do management and employees have avenues for personal development?

Sketch a diagram of lines of authority for your operation.

E. Ownership Structure

Who are the primary stakeholders in your business?

Describe the legal form of your company, such as partnership, proprietorship, or

corporation.

Do you need special permits to operate, or a record for inspections? If you do, please

describe them.

6

F. Social Responsibility

What environmental practices do you follow?

What procedures do you use for handling chemicals?

What noise/dust/timing/odor policies do you have?

What will be the roles of management and employees in community organizations?

What will be your involvement at the local/state/national level in commodity

organizations?

What training and new employee orientation practices will you offer to insure proper

handling of hazardous materials and safe operation of equipment?

G. Internal Analysis

What are the strengths and weaknesses of your firm?

What are the relative strengths of each enterprise or business unit within the firm?

What are the core competencies (things you are doing better than others) of your firm?

What things can you build on? Think only about the things that you can control.

Suggested areas to consider:

knowledge and work

financial position

productivity

family

lifestyle

location

resources

What enterprise or business unit should be exited?

What enterprise or business unit shows promise?

7

Products and/or Services

Describe the products and services you plan to sell.

How is your product or service unique?

Are you producing a commodity or a differentiated product?

How does your product or service compare to other products in

Quality? Price? Location?

What experience do you have with this product/service?

8

Market Assessment

A. Examining the General Market

How is the market characterized?

Are there clear segments in the market? Describe them.

What important customer need(s) is the market not currently fulfilling?

What is the growth potential for each segment of the market?

What opportunities and threats does your firm face?

What does an analysis using the Five Forces model suggest about your industry? Who is

your competition (in light of the Five Forces)?

What trends, relevant to your business, do you see?

What are the drivers of change?

What political and legal issues do you face, such as zoning, environmental laws,

inspections, etc?

B. Customer Analysis

Who will be your customers?

What do you sell to each of the customers?

How does your product/service solve a key customer problem?

How difficult is it to retain a customer?

How much does it cost to support a customer?

C. Industry Analysis

D. Strategic Alternatives

9

Strategic Implementation

A. Production

How will you produce your product?

What value will you create and capture with your product?

What is your competitive advantage?

What technology will you use, i.e. reduced tillage, GPS systems, etc.?

What processes will you use to produce products?

What growth options will you use to develop the business unit?

Enterprise Expansion

Replicate

Integrate

Network

What is the anticipated timeline?

B. Resource Needs

In order to effectively organize your business you need to insure the resources are

available. Assess those needs here.

a)

Human

What skills are needed?

How will human resources be acquired?

b)

Financial

What level of financial resources will be needed?

c)

Physical

What type, quantity and quality of physical resources will be required?

C. Sourcing/Procurement Strategy

On what do you base a decision to buy products or services? Price? Quality?

Convenience? Extra service? A combination?

By what venue will you find suppliers — local dealer, Internet, direct from manufacturer,

etc.?

D. Marketing Strategy

What is your sales plan?

What advertising and promotion will be used to increase sales/awareness?

Where will you sell products/services?

Will you use the open market or contracts?

Do you have a preferred market outlet?

Are you a qualified supplier for a specific processor or buyer?

How will you price the product?

10

a)

Hedging, forward pricing, options

How will you use these to mitigate your risk?

b)

Contracting

Will you use production or marketing contracting to reduce risk?

c)

Insurance

How will you use crop, liability and other insurance?

E. Performance Standards

What performance standards will be used to monitor this enterprise or business unit?

What are acceptable performance standards?

What yield or output levels could you attain?

What efficiency levels will you reach?

What procedures will be used to monitor performance?

Who is responsible for monitoring performance?

What industry benchmarks will be used to assess performance?

11

Financial Plan

A. Financial Projections

How will you fund the business?

What is your desired debt and equity position?

Who will provide capital debt funds?

What role will leasing play in your financial strategy?

Will you use outside investors for equity capital?

How will you manage the financial risks your business faces?

What operating procedures, such as developing cash flow budgets or spending limits, will

you have to ensure adequate money for debt repayment?

What are the important assumptions that underlie your projections? These assumptions

may be associated with both external or internal factors.

What financial aspects of your business (equity, asset growth, ROA, ROE, etc.) will you

monitor?

What procedures will be used for monitoring overall business performance?

What level of performance will your business shoot for? These should be targets for next

year and in five years. They should be financial performance standards used to monitor

the overall business.

What yield and output levels could you attain? What efficiency levels will you reach?

B. Contingency Plan

What will you do if you can’t follow through with your primary plan?

How are you preparing for an emergency in your business?

How will the business function if something happens to one of the key members of the

management team?

****For Miss Deana***

Pollo Campero in the USA
Esteban R. Brenes

Strategy Department, INCAE Business School, Alajuela, Costa Rica

Amitava Chattopadyay
INSEAD Business School, Singapore, Singapore

Luciano Ciravegna
International Development Institute, King’s College London, London, UK and

INCAE Business School, Alajuela, Costa Rica, and

Daniel Montoya
INCAE Business School, Alajuela, Costa Rica

Abstract

Purpose – This case illustrates the challenges that Pollo Campero, a Guatemalan fast food company,
faces when expanding in the US market. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate a discussion
about consumer segmentation, competitive strategy and the internationalization of emerging market
multinationals.
Design/methodology/approach – The case study is based on primary research conducted in
conjunction with the company, including interviews with senior management and an ample review of
documents. Secondary sources have been used to gather information about the industry, the
US market and consumer segments.
Findings – The case illustrates that Pollo Campero was initially very successful in the US market
because it appealed to consumers of Central American origin. It found it harder to appeal to a broader
range of US consumers, who had no emotional attachment to the brand.
Originality/value – This is a complex, in-depth case study suitable for use with advanced MBA
students and practitioners. Depending on the aims of the instructor, different aspects of the case can be
highlighted and it can be used in a competitive strategy class as well as in a corporate strategy class or
a strategic marketing course. It can be used in a class focussing on brand, positioning and consumer
segmentation, a class on competitive strategy in the fast food industry, or a class on the international
strategy of emerging market multinationals.

Keywords Business strategy, USA, International marketing strategy,
Emerging market multinationals, Fast food industry, Internationalization

Paper type Case study

On a hot, steamy summer afternoon in Dallas, Roberto Denegri, President and COO of
Campero USA (CUSA) – a wholly-owned subsidiary of Guatemalan fast-food company
Pollo Campero Corporation – sat in his air-conditioned office in the Lincoln Centre
Tower II, grappling with the question of what CUSA’s growth strategy should be over
the next years. Pollo Campero Corporation entered the US in 2002 with a single
restaurant in Los Angeles (LA). Since then, it had expanded, largely because of its
popularity with customers of Central American origin. In 2007, the Board of Directors
of Pollo Campero Corporation moved CUSA from Guatemala to Dallas to better
manage its operations in the US Pollo Campero had an ambitious goal for CUSA –
to open approximately 300 restaurants by 2014. Now, in 2010, the number of
Pollo Campero restaurants had reached 48, covering 12 states and Washington, DC –
not a bad result per se, but not on pace with the goals set in 2007. The market research
report sitting on Denegri’s desk provided a clear picture of industry trends and
consumer segments in the US market. Pollo Campero’s Board of Directors had stated

The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available at
www.emeraldinsight.com/0025-1747.htm

Management Decision
Vol. 52 No. 9, 2014

pp. 1649-1679
r Emerald Group Publishing Limited

0025-1747
DOI 10.1108/MD-09-2013-0498

1649

Pollo Campero
in the USA

very clearly to Denegri that it expected CUSA to continue to be a key growth driver for
the corporation.

Denegri needed to evaluate the situation and prepare his recommendations for
the next Board meeting, happening in two weeks. Among other things, Denegri was
asking himself if it was time to change the way their brand and their company were
positioned in the USA.

Pollo Campero
Pollo Campero, loosely translated to “country chicken,” was founded in Guatemala in
1971. It offered customers a new fast-food concept in terms of flavor: a tender, juicy,
crispy chicken, marinated with a mix of spices highlighting Central American flavors.
In 1972, Pollo Campero expanded to neighboring El Salvador, taking advantage of
similarities in consumer tastes. By 1982, the company had 18 restaurants in Guatemala
and seven in El Salvador. In 1992, the company opened its first restaurant in Honduras,
where it had also acquired a poultry farm. Guatemalans, Salvadorians and Hondurans
traveled frequently throughout Central America, which helped Pollo Campero become
a well-known brand in the region. In 1997, Pollo Campero developed a franchise
program, which allowed the company to open stores in Panama and later in Nicaragua,
Costa Rica, Ecuador and Mexico.

Between 1997 and 2000, Campero became the most internationalized Latin
American fast-food chain, with 143 restaurants and nearly 6,000 employees. By 2001,
Pollo Campero had decided to enter the USA, encouraged by the large number of
people buying their fried chicken in El Salvador and Guatemala to bring to their
relatives in the USA. Pollo Campero Corporation CEO Juan José Gutierrez said[1]:

When boarding a flight from El Salvador or Guatemala to Los Angeles and other
destinations, you could smell the chicken all the way, so the Campero management team,
further motivated by suggestions from airline managers, resolved to take this opportunity to
offer their product to this market niche, and we did so through franchisees just as we had
been doing in Latin American countries.

In 2002, Pollo Campero opened its first US restaurant in LA through a franchise
agreement with ADIR Restaurants Corp., a sister company of La Curacao. La Curacao
sold consumer electronics, such as home computers and digital cameras, and home
appliances. It was an ideal partner for Pollo Campero because it was based in LA, the
US city with the largest number of Central Americans and, thus, catered specifically
to that population. For example, La Curacao provided export delivery services to
Guatemala and El Salvador. ADIR became a master developer in 2001 and was the only
sub-franchisor licensed by Pollo Campero to offer sub-franchises in California,
Washington, Oregon, Nevada, New Mexico and Arizona (Campero USA Corp, 2011).

The restaurant openings broke sales records in the industry, hitting $1 million in its
first 22 days (Arndt, 2010). Juan José Gutierrez commented:

People came to the newly-opened Pollo Campero and for several months, especially at the
beginning, the restaurant was full of customers. That was very encouraging. We found that
more people than normal came because some drove from far off places to visit, but only at the
opening time. Of course, after that they did return but just occasionally; therefore, we had to
keep with the Central Americans living near the restaurant.

Campero opened stores in other cities and states, especially those with large
settlements of Central Americans, such as DC, Texas and New York. In 2003,

1650

MD
52,9

Pollo Campero created CUSA, an organizational unit located in Guatemala, to manage
the operations in the USA. Operations Manager of CUSA Rodolfo Bianchini said:

Restaurants required someone to break in hands and make them ready for opening, so we
stayed between two and three weeks working on them. We spent about half of the year in
the United States.

Between 2002 and 2007, Pollo Campero opened 30 restaurants, targeting mainly the
Central Americans living in the USA. During the opening weeks, sales ranged between
US $10,000 and $50,000 per day in each restaurant, which, according to Denegri, was
above the average sales of competitors.

In 2007, the Board of Directors established a set of strategic objectives for the future.
Its objectives for the US market were to be among the top 50 quick-service restaurants
(QSRs) in terms of average annual sales, and to open approximately 300 restaurants by
2014. In order to facilitate learning about the US market, the Board of Directors moved
CUSA to Dallas. Dallas was chosen because of its proximity to Guatemala (a three-hour
flight) and because it was a strategic location for operations’ logistics. Roberto Denegri,
a manager with previous experience in the fast-food industry, was appointed President
and COO of CUSA, together with a finance director, an operations manager and a
person in charge of granting franchises. Denegri hired four new managers to improve
the marketing and operations of CUSA. Denegri had to report to Juan José Gutierrez,
CEO of Pollo Campero Corporation, and to the Board of Directors. The Board gave
Denegri the responsibility for ensuring that CUSA’s strategy was suited to achieving
the long-term objectives they had set (see Figure 1).

Initially, the restaurants in the USA were a simple copy-paste of its offering in
Central America. Waiters and cashiers spoke better Spanish than English since many
of them were Central Americans. In order to test new concepts and improve CUSA’s
organizational learning in the US market, Denegri decided to open some company-
owned restaurants. In 2007, CUSA opened two new restaurants in Dallas and bought
back 50 percent of a restaurant established in 2004 in a joint venture with a franchisee.
Dallas had 449,600 households with an average of 2.6 members and an average
household income of US $41,800. The Hispanic population accounted for 42.4 percent

Source: Pollo Campero USA Corp.

CEO

President/COO

Admin/Receptionist

Sr. Director of Treasury and
Accounting

Sr. Director of Company
Ops (Procurement) Marketing VP

Sr. Marketing
Manager

Marketing Manager

Field Marketing
Specialist

Director of
Operations Services

Director of Training

Training
Coordinator

EVP of Franchise
Operations

Director of
Licensing

Franchise Business
Consultant

Franchise Business
Consultant

Director of
Development

Paralegal

Human Resources

Accounting
Supervisor

Bookkeeper

Bookkeeper

Director of QA

Figure 1.
Pollo Campero USA Corp.
(CUSA) organization chart

1651

Pollo Campero
in the USA

of the entire population, most from Mexico and Central America, and whites and
blacks accounted for 28.8 and 25 percent, respectively. Neighboring cities, such as
Irving and Farmer Branch, also had large Hispanic communities.

By late 2007, there were 36 restaurants under the name of Pollo Campero. The
increase in restaurant openings was the result of an increased number of franchisees
(from seven to 20), each responsible for a smaller territory of three to five restaurants in
smaller geographical areas. The franchise opportunities were offered under a disclosure
document and were only for the development and operation of Pollo Campero
restaurants outside of the ADIR territory and within the USA. In November 2007, the
company also entered into an agreement with Wal-Mart to run Pollo Campero
restaurants inside Wal-Mart stores. It was a great opportunity to open stores nationwide.
Guiselle Ruiz, Vice-president and Regional General Manager of Wal-Mart Stores,
USA, said:

Our customers today come from many different backgrounds and all walks of life. Many
are Latin American, and they are among our fastest-growing markets. It stands to reason
that our offerings reflect the needs of the communities we serve. We know Pollo Campero
will add value to Wal-Mart with its premium Latin American restaurant brand (Marketwire,
2007).

Lorenzo L�opez, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. spokesman, stated: “It’s kind of like when we’re
looking at salsa versus ketchup and tortillas versus bread” (Daily News, 2008).

Between 2008 and 2009, CUSA achieved an improvement in its financial results
(see Tables I and II).

However, by June 2010, the growth rate defined during the 2007 strategy session
and the goal of 300 restaurants by 2014, were not being accomplished. Pollo Campero
had only 48 stores in 12 states and Washington, DC (see Table III).

Pollo Campero restaurants feature brightly colored booths with Latin authenticity,
and 50 percent of them have drive-through windows (see Plate 1). The US menu
included fried plantains and milky horchata, drinks from its original menu, but also
uniquely American dishes such as grilled chicken and mashed potatoes, aimed to
appeal to US consumers at large (see Figure 2). The cooking process of chicken,
marinated with over 20 ingredients, including spices native to Central America and
breaded by hand, made the flavor penetrate to the bone. The chicken was juicy and free
of trans-fat, differentiating Campero from other restaurants. The beans cooked and
served at the restaurants resulted from a blend of nine ingredients.

Campero’s prices varied all across the USA. On average, they tended to be on
par with KFC and a little less than Popeye’s. However, both of those brands invested
large sums on TV advertising, generating a stronger value perception with consumers.
Campero, lacking the resources to compete with KFC and Popeye’s through
advertising, introduced new promotions. It imitated its competitors by offering eight
pieces of chicken for $7.99 and by adding snacks to the menu with prices from US $0.99
for products such as a tortilla with chicken, which attracted new consumers.
CUSA soon realized that the copy-paste approach would not work everywhere. In
Central America, Pollo Campero is well recognized. In the USA, the name was totally
unfamiliar, except to customers with Central American roots. Rodolfo Bianchini clearly
appreciated this and said with regard to the restaurant in Wal-Mart:

Most people didn’t know the brand. However, we are simply a “chicken” concept. So people
came over and tried the product and in most cases they ended up very pleased
(Daily News, 2008).

1652

MD
52,9

2009 2008

Revenues
Royalties 2,856,503.00 2,497,954.00
Store development fees 1,409,063.00 243,750.00
Franchise fees 80,000.00 70,000.00
Others 98,923.00 70,095.00

Total revenues 4,444,489.00 2,881,799.00
Expenses

General and administrative expenses 1,204,765.00 1,391,182.00
Advertising and marketing 136,139.00 499,624.00
Professional fees 784,611.00 1,553,020.00
Project development 36,959.00 321,799.00
Salaries and payroll taxes 3,412,549.00 3,505,202.00
Travel 561,183.00 723,917.00

Total operating expenses 6,136,206.00 7,994,744.00
Loss before provision for income taxes – –
Net loss (1,691,717.00) (5,112,945.00)

Source: Campero USA Corp. (2011, p. 365)
Table II.

Statement of operations

2009 2008

Assets
Current assets

Cash and cash equivalents 414,597.00 1,217,233.00
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of
approximately US $ 67,000 and US $38,000 as of June 30, 2009
and 2008, respectively 219,967.00 330,819.00
Due from related parties and others 494,482.00 307,130.00
Prepaid expenses and other current assets 64,441.00 127,275.00

Total current assets 1,193,487.00 1,982,457.00
Restricted cash 267,317.00 255,000.00
Note receivable, franchisee 1,080,000.00 –
Property and equipment, net 533,738.00 347,656.00
Due from related parties, less current portion 608,722.00 1,182,205.00
Deposits and other assets 60,905.00 24,071.00
Total assets 3,744,169.00 3,791,389.00
Liabilities and stockholder’s deficit
Current liabilities

Accounts payable 202,299.00 727,518.00
Accrued expenses 458,301.00 745,105.00
Deferred revenue 768,750.00 1,220,000.00
Due to related parties – current portion 77,928.00 –

Total current liabilities 1,507,278.00 2,692,623.00
Due to related parties, less current portion 2,309,498.00 1,080,243.00
Deferred revenue 839,687.00 1,240,000.00
Total liabilities 4,656,463.00 5,012,866.00
Commitments and contingencies
Stockholder’s deficit (913,294.00) (1,221,477.00)
Total liabilities and stockholder’s deficit 3,743,169.00 3,791,389.00

Source: Campero USA Corp. (2011, p. 365)

Table I.
Pollo Campero USA corp.

(CUSA) 2008 and 2008
balance sheet

1653

Pollo Campero
in the USA

Less than 1 percent of the US population identified themselves as Central Americans.
Their family income did not exceed $40,000 per year. They visited QSRs about five
times per week, spending between US $22 and US $26 per week. Attracting
Central Americans to its restaurants had been easy, but their small numbers limited
the prospect for Campero’s future growth in the US Denegri realized that in order to
decide which strategy to adopt, CUSA needed to understand how the broader set
of US consumers perceived Pollo Campero and its main competitors: how did they
perceive the name, the facilities, the products, and the experience? Were they
comfortable in different environments, such as the “Latin” environment of Campero?
What did they expect from going into a Campero restaurant? Was it feasible to target
mainstream Americans? Or were there other groups that CUSA could target? To
analyze the engagement of customers, Denegri used an analytic framework provided
by an external consulting firm (see Figure 3).

State Year

Outlets at

beginning

of year

Outlets

opened Terminations

Non-

renewals

Re-acquired

by franchisor

Ceased

operations –

other reasons

Outlets at

year end

Arizona 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2009 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

California 2008 15 3 0 0 0 1 17

2009 17 1 0 0 0 4 14

Florida 2008 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

2009 1 2 0 0 0 0 3

Georgia 2008 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

2009 1 2 0 0 0 0 3

Illinois 2008 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

2009 2 0 0 0 0 0 2

Maryland 2008 3 0 0 0 0 0 3

2009 3 1 0 0 0 0 4

Massachusetts 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2009 0 2 0 0 0 0 2

North Carolina 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

New Jersey 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2009 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

New York 2008 2 2 0 0 0 0 4

2009 4 4 0 0 0 2 6

Rhode Island 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2009 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

South Carolina 2008 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

2009 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

Texas 2008 5 0 0 0 0 1 4

2009 4 3 0 0 0 0 7

Virginia 2008 2 0 0 0 0 0 2

2009 2 1 0 0 0 0 3

Washington DC 2008 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

2009 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

Total USA 2008 30 8 0 0 0 2 36

2009 36 19 0 0 0 6 48

Source: Campero USA Corp. (2011, p. 365)

Table III.
Campero chicken
restaurants in the USA

1654

MD
52,9

The core customers, Central Americans, focussed on the quality of the food and
overlooked other components of the experience because their cultural heritage strongly
connected them with the brand. However, new consumers were not familiar with
Pollo Campero and lacked this clear connection. Brand elements, such as the name and
the logo, were unclear and confusing to them. The consultants from ABC Consulting
Co.[2], a firm hired by CUSA in 2009 to help it change its strategy, mentioned that
“the little chicken” in the logo was infantile, cheap and did not reflect the food quality
of Campero. In addition, the logo typography had some cowboy features; its shape
was similar to that of many of their competitors; and, like Campero, some competitors
also used the Spanish word “Pollo” in their names.

According to the market research carried out by ABC Consulting Co., the atmosphere
of Pollo Campero attracted Central Americans and, in some cases, Hispanics. They
suggested to Denegri that such a Hispanic environment may not be appealing to
non-Hispanic Americans, who comprised the largest percentage of population and had
the most purchasing power (see Figure 4).

In addition to its foray into the USA, Pollo Campero Corporation crossed the
Atlantic in 2006 to open a restaurant in Spain and then one in Andorra. It did so
through a joint venture between Pollo Campero Corporation and Agrolimen, a Spanish
business group, through its affiliate company Eat Out Group, owner of the Pans
and Company chain, ranking number one in bocadillo/sandwich sales in Spain. Their
franchise in Central America was run by Pollo Campero Corporation. In the following
years, the group entered China, Indonesia, Bahrain and India through joint ventures
with local businesses. By the summer of 2012, Pollo Campero Corporation accounted
for US $400 million. Revenue came from the more than 80 million customers it served
yearly in 14 countries (see Table IV) through a network of some 330þ restaurants.
The Corporation had three divisions: The Latam division based in Guatemala ran
the Latin American business; CUSA ran the USA out of the Dallas HQ; and a third
division called Campero International Franchising ran the rest of the world from its
headquarters in Spain.

Source: Pollo Campero USA Corp.

Plate 1.
Restaurant

1655

Pollo Campero
in the USA

Franchise agreement
Through its franchises, CUSA allowed franchisees to operate Pollo Campero stores
that sold the unique Pollo Campero chicken products. Franchisees signed a Store
Development Agreement to develop a single specific location or a network of
Pollo Campero stores within a targeted area under the Store Development Program.
A network typically consisted of three or more stores. In addition to the typical
Pollo Campero Store, CUSA granted to qualified prospects the right to operate
a Pollo Campero “Express Unit.” An Express Unit was suited to some urban areas and
special venues, where conditions required a more-concise format, such as inside
shopping malls and airports, and could include special distribution opportunities
offered to franchisees (Campero USA Corp., 2011).

All Pollo Campero stores had to be developed and operated to meet CUSA
specifications and standards. The Franchise Agreement was limited to specific
location(s), and CUSA had the right to set up restaurants or issue franchises aiming to

Source: Pollo Campero USA Corp.

Figure 2.
Pollo campero menu

1656

MD
52,9

capture customers in the same geographic area, subject to the limited territory granted
in a Store Development Agreement. The specifications and standards included a
distinctive exterior and interior design, decor, color and identification schemes and
furnishings; special menu items; the unique flavor of their fried chicken, marinated and
breaded with a secret formula; standards, specifications and operation procedures;
quality of products and services offered; management programs; training and
assistance; and marketing and promotional programs, all of which CUSA could
change, supplement, and further develop.

Source: InterBrand Design Forum, “Segmentation and Brand
Strategy”, Pollo Campero, June 18, 2010

Affinity

Enabling

Tr
a
n
sa

ct
io

n
a
l

In
te

rp
e
rs

o
n

a
l

Emotional
Higher Social Value
Helps Define Me
Attachment Based on
Extroverted Wants

General
Broad
Impersonal
Product-Driven
Mass

Functional
Lower Social Value
Works With Me
Attachment Based on Introverted
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Specific, Specialized
Deep

Personal
Service-Driven

Unique

Figure 3.
Framework of analysis:

engagement

Source: United States Census Bureau (2011b)

Population of
largest group

DC
10,000,000
5,000,000
1,000,000
100,000

Hispanic origin group

Cuban
Dominican
Mexican
Puerto Rican
Salvadoran

00 100 Miles

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census
Summary File l.

0 100 Miles 50 Miles

Figure 4.
Distribution of hispanic

population in the USA

1657

Pollo Campero
in the USA

CUSA had three different store formats. The Free-Standing Pollo Campero retail stores
did not share any common walls with a third party and had their own parking areas.
They generally required a lot ranging from 1,400 to 4,000 m2 (15,000-43,000 sq. ft.) and
a building ranging from 170 to 260 m

2
(1,800-2,800 sq. ft.) in size. The total investment

required to begin operation of a Free-Standing location ranged between $826,537
and $1,652,500. The second format, In-Line Pollo Campero stores were mid-sized
restaurants located in commercial properties sharing a common wall with a third
party, such as in a strip mall. They were generally 185 to 300 m2 (2,000-3,200 sq. ft.)
in size. Total investment for an In-Line location ranged from $651,950 to $1,433,500.
Finally, the Express Pollo Campero units were smaller restaurants, such as a counter
at a food court in a shopping mall. They were generally from 65 to 150 m2

(700-1,600 sq. ft.) in size. Total investment for this format ranged from $312,421 to
$679,500.

These investment ranges included a $40,000 initial franchise fee, and if the
franchisee leased or subleased the premises from CUSA, $5,000 for the security deposit
and prepaid rental charges would be required, for a total of $45,000 in initial fees that
had to be paid to CUSA or its affiliates before the franchisee opened for business
(see Table V). Two others fees, the “Continuing Franchise Fee” and the “Continuing
Advertising Fee,” each amounting to 5.0 percent of gross sales, had to be paid
weekly. Monitoring of sales and operating costs at different types of stores showed
variability in performance between the eastern and western regions of the USA
(see Tables VI and VII).

US industry and competitive landscape
In 2009, there were over 945,000 food-service outlets in the USA employing 12.7 million
people. The National Restaurant Association (NRA) projected a 2.5 percent increase in
industry revenues in 2010 over 2009, reaching US $580 billion (see Table VIII). Stores
were categorized by their nature as either commercial sites, accounting for 91.4 percent
of revenues, or non-commercial ones, accounting for 8.6 percent (see Table IX).

Franchises Country Stores

Affiliates Pollo Campero, S.A (“PC”), Guatemala 139
Pollo Campero de El Salvador, S.A. de C.V. (“PCES”) El Salvador 89
Pollo Campero, S.A (“PC”), Honduras 15
Varesse, S.A. de C.V. (“VAR”) Mexico 3
Inversiones 12,995, S.A. Costa Rica 19
Campero International, Corp. (“CIC”), Nicaragua 5
Campero USA Corp. (CUSA) USA 50
Pollo Campero Iberia, (“PC Iberia”) Spain 8
Pollo Campero Iberia, (“PC Iberia”) Andorra 1
Pollo Campero Iberia, (“PC Iberia”) Indonesia 3
Pollo Campero Iberia, (“PC Iberia”) Bahrain 2
Pollo Campero Iberia, (“PC Iberia”) Ecuador 5
Pollo Campero Iberia, (“PC Iberia”) India 2
Pollo Campero Iberia, (“PC Iberia”) UK 1
Pollo Campero of Canada, Inc. Canada 0

Source: Campero USA Corp. (2011, p. 365)

Table IV.
Pollo Campero global
expansion

1658

MD
52,9

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****For Miss Deana***


Instructions:

Students will work in groups and will submit a written business plan. This document should be no longer than 15 pages (including references). The business plan should follow the structure presented in this course in module 6 in the document titled “sample business plan” in canvas . Deadlines for submission are indicated below in the table titled: “Assignment breakdown and deadlines”.

The written business plan will be graded using the following rubric:

****For Miss Deana***

Project Name: Case 1 

Date: 03/29/2022

Revision

Product Vision/Mission Statement/Success criteria


Vision:

“Creating a better world, one charitable donation at a time.” Increase the number of electronic donations made by members of our organization.


Mission Statement:

Establish a product that will increase the ease in which an individual can electronically donate money to charitable causes.


Success Criteria:

Measure the number of donations made using the newly developed product within the first six months of production. 

Deliverables

Identify work components (quantifiable good/service) which will be an output of the initiative.

1.   A finished technological product that is easy to use.

2.   A payment system that connects charitable organizations with  individuals willing to donate funds. 

 

Assumptions/Constraints


Assumption:

The project team must identify the assumptions they will be working under as the project goes forward.  These assumptions are what the project manager/team expect to have or be made available without anyone specifically stating so. 


Constraint:

Constraints are restrictions or limitations that the project manager must deal with pertaining to people, money, time, or equipment.  It is the project manager’s role to balance these constraints with available resources in order to ensure project success.

Risks

Identify any risks/issues:

1.   Unable to identify all glitches in the system

2.   Cybersecurity Risk – must protect the personal banking information/employee identification information of all end users

****For Miss Deana***

Case 1 – Amazing Inc.

Background


Amazing Inc. is a large organization with a senior leadership team that is passionate about giving back to the community. In fact, taking care of people within and outside of the organization is one of their founding principles. By building and instilling a culture of giving, Amazing Inc.’s executive Board and their +10,000 employees make a positive difference in their communities.


To make it easy for their employees to support charitable causes, Amazing Inc. wants to create a site that facilitates and promotes charitable giving. They want the site to enable both formal campaigns and one-off donations through automatic payroll deductions. This will make it easy for employees to donate to selected campaigns and Amazing Inc. hopes to motivate them by matching the employee contributions.


A Scrum Master has been assigned to the Project. To launch the project, a one-page project charter must be completed.


The assumption is that to complete the following steps, the project charter has already been completed/approved (I have faith in your team ). With direction from the Scrum Product Owner and Scrum Development Team (past tense) a session is held with Stakeholders to collect a set of ideas and requirements needed to complete the project. An example of idea collected from the business is included below:

Assume the following scope considerations:

· Legal needs to provide Terms and Conditions (T&C) to complete the user confirmation page.

· The Login Page (part of the last sprint) has an issue accepting emails that end on @domain.net. This needs to be fixed as part of the next sprint.

The initial ideas have been converted into user stories. Now, the team needs to estimate and prioritize each story to determine the level of effort needed for each requirement.

Assignment:

1. Select the following roles from your group:

1.1. Scrum Master

1.2. Scrum Product Owner

1.3.
Development team

2. Input the Project backlog into Monday.com

2.1.
“One”
individual from each group will need to create a Free account in Monday.com.

2.2. From Main Workspace (1), Click on _Add_New Blank Board (Name: Sprint Planning)_Create

2.3. Ensure the following columns are included on the board – Name, Owner, Status (To Do/In Progress/Done), Priority (High/Med/Low), Story Type (Bug/Feature/Chore), Estimated SP, and Epic

2.4. Once the template is created, invite your team and instructor to your Workspace (Use the icon on the black pane on the left side of the screen).

REQUIRED: Copy the link and include in your Canvas submission.

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2.5. Enter the user stories contained in Table 1 into Monday.com [Stories > Backlog Section].

[Tip: You can copy (from Word) and Paste directly into Monday.com]

3. Using the Product Backlog Section, conduct a Backlog refinement session (backlog grooming) with your team to Prioritize and Estimate all User Stories.

3.3. Go over each story and assign the following:

3.3.1. Priority (HML)

3.3.2. Story Type (Feature/Chore/Bug)

3.3.3. Epic – Assign all user stories to the same epic…Charity Site MVP

3.3.4. Estimated Story Point (Scale: 1 to 6)

As a team, define the Level of Effort (LOE) for each Story Point

[i.e. 1 SP is equivalent of 2-4 hours of work; 5 Story Points are the equivalent of 3 days effort]

3.4. Export the Product Backlog to Excel

[Note: this will be part of the “assignment deliverables” – see C below]

4. Conduct a Planning session. Please note that the team’s current velocity is 10 Story Points/Sprint. Setup 4 Sprints on the template (Sprint 1 through Sprint 4). Assign user stories to the net 4 Sprints. Assume the backlog represents approximately 40 story points in total.

Assignment Deliverables


NOTE (IMPORTANT):
This case is inspired on a real-life Product that was originally created for internal employee consumption. Due to the great success (more than $2.5 million raised in support of non-profits organization and charitable causes…including COVID Relief), it was eventually converted into a Customer Facing Product and offered to customers
at no additional charge
. Read more about this use case here. To explore the interactive demo (which will provide more insight into the complexity associated with requirements/development) use this link, provide your information, and click on the [Continue] button to get started.

A. Project Charter: Use the template provided

B.
Team Composition: Briefly describe the roles associated with your agile team (Scrum Master, Product Owner, Development team member). Briefly explain how your team determined roles/team composition).

C. Product Backlog – Include excel attachment (see Assignment 3.2 above).

D.
Backlog Refinement Process:

i.
What is the reasoning behind the prioritization process? How did your team reach a consensus? What was the rationale? How did team roles effect the process during this meeting?

E.
Sprint Planning Session:

i.
Explanation: What are Sprints? Explain the reasoning/importance of assigning a certain number of story points to each Sprint. What will be the importance of a Daily Scrum meeting during the Sprints?

F. Upload the link of the Board created for the project to Canvas.


Note: Deliverables B, D, & E can be submitted as a single document (2-3 pages Word doc, single spaced, 12 Times New Roman Font). Make sure to include a reference page if outside sources are used.

Table 1:

Product Backlog for a Site to support charitable donations

Task ID

User Stories

1

As a User, I want to see all my Year-to-date donations

2

As an Admin, I want to view the total amount of money collected, broken down by employee donations and company match

3

As an Admin, I want to see a dashboard with relevant information

4

As and Admin, I want to choose a preferred language, come up with an official name, and add a description and image

5

As an Admin, I want to create a new charitable campaign

6

As an Admin, I want to access the details of all campaigns, including active, scheduled, and past

7

As a User, I want to see how much was contributed for the campaign

8

As an Admin, I want to preview the campaign to ensure everything is correct before sending to employees.

9

As an Admin, I want to be able to fill in many details of the campaign to help employees better understand the importance of contributing to new campaigns.

10

As an Admin, I want to choose how would receive the campaign, whether it’s to a specific group of employees, or to the entire organization

11

As a User, I want to select the amount I want to donate

12

As a User, I want to submit tickets when I’m having technical difficulties with the site

13

As a User, I want to login to the charitable campaign site via my phone or tablet

14

As a User, I want to scroll through the active campaigns and select the one I want to contribute to.

15

As an Admin, I want to set up the donation options by entering preset amounts, company-match percentage, campaign goal amount, and the deduction code.

16

As a user, I need a to review and accept to the T&C before submitting the donation.