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DBMS implementation

Running Head: Conceptual Modeling Design 1

Conceptual Modeling Design 4


Conceptual Modeling Design

Student’s Name:

Tutor’s name:

Date:

The entities to be used include the following:

· Artist.

· Manager

· Producer

· Event

· Album

· Organizers

· Label

· Release

Relationships

The manager manages all the activities that the artist should take part in including signing the artist, managing the artist’s resources, advising the artist etc. The producer deals with the music production part, together with the organizers, they organize events that the artist will perform at. The producer together with the manager oversea the recording and the release of albums.

Each of the entities will have various attributes as follows:

· Under the manager the primary key will be the manager’s ID, other attributes will include the manager’s name, address, and the phone number.

· Under the artist the PK will be the artist’s ID while the other attributes will be the name, address, genre of music, and the phone number.

· The producer’s section will include the name, address, phone number, the salary, and the producer’s ID.

· The event will have attributes such as the type of event, the amount to be charged per person, and the reference number of the event.

· The label will include the record label’s name, the amount they charge, the serial number of the record label.

· The release entity will attribute such as the release date, and the venue of the release.

ERD Blueprint.

The ERD shows the relationship between the various entities involved in the music production.

Organizers

Event

Producer

Artist

Album

Label

Release

Manager

Reference.

D’Angelo, A. (2016). Development of the reliability-risk modeling framework for ranking conceptual designs. Volume 14: Emerging Technologies; Materials: Genetics to Structures; Safety Engineering and Risk Analysis. https://doi.org/10.1115/imece2016-66791

Embley, D. W., & Thalheim, B. (2012). Handbook of conceptual modeling: Theory, practice, and research challenges. Springer Science & Business Media.

Mok, W. Y., & Embley, D. W. (1996). Transforming conceptual models to object-oriented database designs: Practicalities, properties, and peculiarities. Conceptual Modeling — ER ’96, 309-324. https://doi.org/10.1007/bfb001993

DBMS implementation

Running Head: DATABASE 1

DATABASE 3

Database

Student Name

Tutor’s Name

Date

Artist

Artist_ID

Name

Event

Event_ID

Date

Organizers

Organizer_ID

Name

Manager

Manager_ID

Name

Album

Album_ID

Title

Artist_ID

Year

Label_ID

Label

Label_ID

Name

Producer

Producer_ID

Name

Release

Release_ID

Date

1 1

*

*

1

1 *

*

1 1

* *

1

*

Reference


Schmidt & Brodie, M. L. (2018). Relational database systems: Analysis and comparison. Springer Science & Business Media.

Captain, F. A. (2018). Six-step relational database design: A step by step approach to relational database design and development. Fidel A Captain.

DBMS implementation

Running Head:“SQL Queries” 1

“SQL Queries” 7

“SQL Queries”

Student’s Name:

Tutor’s Name:

Date:

CREATE TABLE Artist (

Artist_ID INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,

Name char (255) NOT NULL,

address VARCHAR (255) NOT NULL,

);

INSERT INTO Artist(Name, address)

VALUES(‘Justine’,’3950 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Drake’,’5000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Rihana’,’3000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Ariana’,’4000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Snoop’,’5000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Shakur’,’6000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Jayz’,’7000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Birdingfield’,’8000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Jackson’,’9000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Sam’,’10000 North 1st Street CA 95134′);

Show table Artist;

CREATE TABLE Label (

Label_ID INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,

Name char (255) NOT NULL,

);

INSERT INTO Artist(label)

VALUES(‘Justine’),

(‘Drake’),

(‘Rihanna’),

(‘Ariana’,),

(‘Snoop’,),

(‘Shakur’),

(‘Jayz’),

(‘Birding field’),

(‘Jackson’),

(‘Sam’);

CREATE TABLE Event (

Event_ID INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,

Date datetime,

);

CREATE TABLE organizers (

organizer_ID INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,

Name char (255) NOT NULL,

address VARCHAR (255) NOT NULL,

);

INSERT INTO organizers (Name, address)

VALUES(‘Justine’,’3950 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Drake’,’5000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Rihana’,’3000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Ariana’,’4000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Snoop’,’5000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Shakur’,’6000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Jayz’,’7000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Birdingfield’,’8000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Jackson’,’9000 North 1st Street CA 95134′),

(‘Sam’,’10000 North 1st Street CA 95134′);

CREATE TABLE Release (

Release _ID INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,

Date datetime,

);

CREATE TABLE producer (

Producer_ID INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,

Name char (255) NOT NULL,

);

INSERT INTO producer (Name)

VALUES(‘Justine’),

(‘Drake’),

(‘Rihanna’),

(‘Ariana’,),

(‘Snoop’,),

(‘Shakur’),

(‘Jayz’),

(‘Birding field’),

(‘Jackson’),

(‘Sam’);

CREATE TABLE Manager (

Manager_ID INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,

Name char (255) NOT NULL,

);

INSERT INTO Manager (Name)

VALUES(‘Justine’),

(‘Drake’),

(‘Rihanna’),

(‘Ariana’,),

(‘Snoop’,),

(‘Shakur’),

(‘Jayz’),

(‘Birding field’),

(‘Jackson’),

(‘Sam’);

CREATE TABLE Album (

Album_ID INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,

Title char (255) NOT NULL,

FOREIGN KEY (Label_ID) REFERENCES Label (Label_ID),

FOREIGN KEY (Artist_ID) REFERENCES Artist(Artist_ID),

Year year,

);

INSERT INTO Album (Title)

VALUES(‘Justine’),

(‘Drake’),

(‘Rihanna’),

(‘Ariana’,),

(‘Snoop’,),

(‘Shakur’),

(‘Jayz’),

(‘Birding field’),

(‘Jackson’),

(‘Sam’);

References.

Captain, F. A. (2018). Six-step relational database design: A step by step approach to relational

database design and development. Fidel A Captain.

Embley, D. W., & Thalheim, B. (2012). Handbook of conceptual modeling: Theory,

Schmidt & Brodie, M. L. (2018). Relational database systems: Analysis and comparison.

Springer Science & Business Media.

Safety Engineering and Risk Analysis. https://doi.org/10.1115/imece2016-66791

DBMS implementation

1

2

Title

Student’s name

Instructor

Course

Date

DBMS PROPOSAL

“A database management system (DBMS) is a software package for defining, modifying, retrieving, and managing data in databases” (Warman, & Ramdaniansyah, 2018). Users may establish, build, maintain, and regulate access to a database using a DBMS. DBMS allow users to access, modify, and remove data from a database.

For this project, I have selected MySQL Database. There are various reasons why this is one of the best DBMS and should be embraced by any organization (Rawat, & Purnama, 2021). The first and the most critical aspect is its security. Most prominent online programs utilize MySQL as their database management system. The latest version of MySQL, which has data security and transactional processing capability, may considerably help any organization, mainly if it is an eCommerce shop that often processes money. The second primary reason is its scalability. When it comes to the administration of deeply integrated programs, MySQL is unequaled because of its unparalleled scalability. MySQL’s most notable characteristic is its ability to adapt to changing needs. This open-source solution is ideal for eCommerce enterprises with particular database server needs. The third reason is its high performance. An innovative storage-engine structure in MySQL makes it easy for system administrators to fine-tune their servers for optimal performance. “To satisfy the most demanding applications while providing optimal performance with full-text indexes and unique memory caching for better performance, MySQL is built to meet even the most demanding applications” (Rawat, & Purnama, 2021). And lastly is its complete workflow control. MySQL is ready to use from day one. the biggest challenge with this system that I anticipate is hacking.

References

Rawat, B., & Purnama, S. (2021). MySQL Database Management System (DBMS) On FTP Site LAPAN Bandung. International Journal of Cyber and IT Service Management1(2), 173-179. retrieved from: MySQL Database Management System (DBMS) On FTP Site LAPAN Bandung | International Journal of Cyber and IT Service Management (iiast-journal.org)

Warman, I., & Ramdaniansyah, R. (2018). Analisis Perbandingan Kinerja Query Database Management System (Dbms) Antara Mysql 5.7. 16 Dan Mariadb 10.1. Jurnal Teknoif ITP6(1), 32-41. retrieved from: 957-2393-1-PB.pdf

DBMS implementation

 

create the database and load the data. The initial data could be either new data or existing data imported from your SQL scripts. You also establish database objects this week and give the users that you’ve identified access applicable to the database 

The following are steps for the implementation 

  1. Install the DBMS.
  2. Tune the setup variables according to the hardware, software and usage conditions.
  3. Create the database and the tables. (Every table must have a primary key, which uniquely identifies rows in the table and validation rule).
  4. Establish relationships between tables.
  5. Load the data into the tables.
  6. Create at least three forms (splash screen and Main switchboard are optional).
  7. Create at least four transaction requirement Queries
  8. Create data views and reports.

 Attach are references